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TLDR When two speakers become more similar in their speech this is called convergence or accomodation (opposite: divergence). This can occur on all levels of language, phonetics and phonology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. When mutual intellgibility is not an issue, accomodation mainly occurs when speakers like each other or want to appear likeable. ...


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I noticed that too. And it's not only the accent but the usage of words (different for lawyer and for a farmer), the sounds the person is making, movements and gestures. I think it has something to do with "calibration" of your communication with your "opponent". to get the best possible results when the brain thinks it's possible. Notice how you do the ...


5

One similar idea is the Blue Diamonds Optical Illusion, is a series of identical things that appear to be a series of darker and darker and darker things, indefinitely. It shows that the Cornsweet illusion can be repeated over and over again. This reminds me of the way the Shepard tone plays the same thing over and over again, but the pitch seems to get ...


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Some neuroscience papers on sound localization: Joris Philip X, Smith Philip H, and Yin Tom C.T Coincidence Detection in the Auditory System // Neuron (1998) Agmon-Snir Hagai, Carr Catherine E. and Rinzel John The role of dendrites in auditory coincidence detection // Nature (1998) Trussell Laurence O. Synaptic mechanisms for coding timing in auditory ...


4

The location of a sound is defined on three dimensions: distance, elevation, and azimuth. When the distance between a listener and a sound source is changed there is a change in the overall level as well as the relative levels of direct and reverberant sound energy. When the elevation is changed the overall level and the direct to reverberant ratio say ...


3

Extensively. Most prominently, recently, by David Poeppel, Oded Ghitza and Anne-Lise Giraud, in a series of papers. They've, to be precise, mostly focused on MEG correlations with the filtered speech amplitude envelope. Areas around the auditory cortex track it fairly well it seems. There is still much debate about what this means and where it comes from, ...


3

Auditory information is conveyed to the brain from the cochlea via the VIII cranial nerve (aka vestibulocochlear nerve). Under standard conditions the vestibular system gets activated when we move our heads. If we spin around rapidly this can obviously make us feel dizzy and nauseous. The vestibular system can also be activated do to other causes. For ...


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Imitating others behavior patterns while speaking was found to relate more to a cognitive perspective taking than empathy.Chartrand and Bargh 1999 People who do adopt language patterns and accents are actually aware that this makes them fit it and more likable. However, this becomes more difficult to do with age. People who do not imitate accents/speech ...


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It seems apparent that generating and hearing self-directed speech during discriminatory listening would inhibit said discrimination. This is because auditory processing of self-directed speech and audio processing in discriminatory listening would have to compete for resources in decoding auditory information, leading to poorer decoding of the already low-...


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Peter Tse's Infinite Regress Illusion creates the illusion of a stimuli that is continually moving away from a target.


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Straight answer: No. There is no such thing as free lunch when it comes to learning material. Your question is based on the studies of hypno-learning (learning by listening to tapes while sleeping) which has never received empirical support. To memorize in long-term memory you need: Deep encoding. Deep encoding requires transforming the material to things ...


2

First off, if you want to retain information, you have to actively listen to it. Simply putting it on like you would background music is not going to help that much. However, if you do want to learn by listening to a lecture, there are several strategies you can use. Here are some listening strategies you can try to employ. They are mostly targeted at being ...


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According to Howard Gardner and his theory of Multiple Intelligence, I can propose that there is no link between IQ and the ability to mimic sound. The IQ test (originating in the work by Alfred Binet) is not a measure of intelligence pre-se, but rather a measure of the ability of the subject to comprehend in the manner expected. [Look for Gardner's ...


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From experience and some knowledge gathered from all over the place, yes and no. For example, if you want to do two things that are both mind-engaging, you'll probably end up doing both sloppily, or one much better than the other. But if one task is mundane and other mind engaging, like listening to music and doing math problem, or listening to a lecture and ...


1

From the physics(acoustics) perspective, the sensory input changes depending upon pitch. When you hear a sound that is high-pitched, your head blocks the sound wave, creating a sound shadow for the ear on the opposite side of your head from the sound source. This sound shadow means that your ears hear the sound at two different volumes, which the brain then ...


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Try this: http://translate.google.com/translate_tts?tl=de&q="1" or this: http://translate.google.com/translate_tts?tl=de&q="11;27;39;81;32;53" At the moment, I can't test if it pronounces the full numbers right, but I hope it will work. I think the pronunciation of higher numbers are better if you write them like this: NineHundredSixtySix


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