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15 votes

Why does the brain skip over repeated "the" words in sentences?

A study by Rainer et al. (2011) has shown that words are skipped and apparently filled in mentally quite often (in the order of 8 to 30% of times). Two important factors that increased skipping rates ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.7k
12 votes

How do we hear our inner voice?

No, inner speech does not follow the same neural pathway as speech coming in from outside. Rather, inner speech uses the same neural mechanism as outer speech - that is, speech going out. The neural ...
Arnon Weinberg's user avatar
  • 19.8k
8 votes

Name of cognitive bias that causes experts to overestimate their ability in other areas?

The Dunning-Kruger effect is specific to expertise in a particular domain. The domains tested in the original studies by Kruger & Dunning (1999) are: humor, logical reasoning, and English grammar. ...
Steven Jeuris's user avatar
  • 3,523
7 votes

If the color black reflects no light, how are we able to see it?

Objects are visually perceived when they reflect light. A black object does not reflect any light. In other words, no photons are reflected to be detected by the photoreceptors in the retina. A black ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.7k
7 votes

How does the inner ear encode sound intensity?

Short answer Hair cells in the cochlea can code sound intensity via the amount of neurotransmitter they release. Higher sound levels result in more neurotransmitter release and in turn to higher ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.7k
7 votes
Accepted

Do cats exhibit the bouba/kiki effect?

The bouba/kiki effect is the phenomenon that about 95% of subjects assign the name bouba to a blobby form, and the name kiki to a pointy shape (Fig. 1). Fig. 1. Kiki and bouba, at least in 95% of the ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.7k
7 votes
Accepted

What are the temporal limits of the auditory system?

As far as I know, auditory clicks are the shortest possible auditory stimuli. The shortest auditory click I was able to find in the literature, and which was used in a psychophysical context (i.e., ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.7k
7 votes
Accepted

How do hair cells recognize frequencies?

Short answer Population activity in auditory neurons allows rate coding of soundwaves with frequencies that exceed the firing rate limit. Place coding is, however, believed to be the most important ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.7k
6 votes
Accepted

Where would a cognitively separated person get their brain signals excited from?

Seems that you are asking: I am really interested just in the way the brain creates new electrical potentials, "just on his own." and whether [sic] the brain would 'stop working', implying ...
Justas's user avatar
  • 1,537
6 votes

Can humans keep track of two unrelated rhythms?

I never thought that my Bachelor Thesis would ever come in handy. Thank you for this question! Short answer No, you cannot keep up two unrelated rhythms in a stable coordinated fashion when tapping ...
Robin Kramer-ten Have's user avatar
6 votes

Why can't we understand text without subvocalizating it?

In japanese language, kanjis are more than phonemes but represent an idea. For instance, both tree and spirit have the same sound (ki) and can be written with the hiragana "letter" き. But when kanjis ...
socrateslopes's user avatar
6 votes

How does the neocortex distinguish between perception and imagination?

Short answer Perception and imagination in the visual system use pretty much the same neural machinery, but in opposite directions - perception goes bottom-up, from the periphery to the central ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.7k
6 votes
Accepted

How does speed listening work?

Your question made me think of JAWS, a screen reader for the blind. I have worked with visually impaired people for a while and I have always wondered how on earth they can understand the speech ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.7k
6 votes

What are the temporal limits of the auditory system?

In terms of the shortest stimuli, the auditory system can process acoustic impulses, but defining the duration of an impulse is problematic. As the duration of the impulse gets shorter, the bandwidth ...
StrongBad's user avatar
  • 2,633
5 votes

Is there a standard definition of a "hallucination"?

Elliot et al. (2008) define a hallucination as: A sensory experience which occurs in the absence of corresponding external stimulation of the relevant sensory organ, has sufficient sense of reality ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.7k
5 votes
Accepted

Difference between thoughts and sensations

Short answer Sensations are different from thoughts and are separated in the spatial and temporal domain. The distinction between thoughts and perceptions, however, is less well defined, but can still ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.7k
5 votes

Why baby animals seem "cute" to us?

What you are referring to is broadly known as baby schema. However, does this not only apply to human babies, but actually to most mammals which need (parental)care. Certain features in the mammal ...
Ebbinghaus's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

How does the brain project pain on to a particular part of the body?

Short answer Peripheral sensory information is projected unidirectionally to the brain. A sensory strip of the brain contains a topographical representation of the surface of the body that facilitates ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.7k
5 votes
Accepted

What do you call sensations without stimuli?

Short answer Visual hallucinations and, more specifically, phosphenes are the terms you are probably after. Background I'll basically provide a list of terminologies below, as your question seems to ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.7k
5 votes
Accepted

How does a person who wears prism glasses through which the world is perceived upside-down experience the transition back to normal?

Short answer Based on the papers I've found I conclude that visual perceptions are not grossly altered after wearing prism glasses for extended periods. Instead, adaptation to prism glasses is mainly ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.7k
5 votes

Concept for 'too much exposure to a bad idea can make it seem normal'?

Are you thinking of desensitization? From wikipedia: In psychology, desensitization is defined as the diminished emotional responsiveness to a negative or aversive stimulus after repeated exposure to ...
Syntax Junkie's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Why Is It That We Have Blindspots in Our Eyes?

The blind spots are scotomas (areas of degenerated acuity) found in all mammalian eyes, and are due to the way the optic nerve crosses the retina (back of the eye): Because there are no cells to ...
Arnon Weinberg's user avatar
  • 19.8k
5 votes
Accepted

What is the difference (in a recording) between speech and a sound? What makes the difference to the brain?

Speech is sound and the brain will recognise the sound as speech. As for the possibility of creating the sound of speech without recordings using sound waveforms I would say that is off topic here and ...
Chris Rogers's user avatar
  • 12.3k
5 votes

How does speed listening work?

There is probably not a large difference from what occurs during normal listening--and that is likely why speed listening is effective: a. The reason it "feels" normal is the same that any other ...
eyeExWhy's user avatar
  • 536
5 votes
Accepted

Is V1 involved in visual imagery?

Short answer V1 can be recruited for visual imagery, but it is not strictly needed for imagery to occur, and it is not sufficient in itself to allow for visual imagery. Background Visual imagery is a ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.7k
5 votes
Accepted

How do we know what colors animals perceive?

There are some levels of confusion in this in question, but basically we can test what wavelengths animals perceive (simple behavioral tests, e.g. training & testing them to distinguish a certain ...
got trolled too much this week's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

What is the scientific term for the tendency to see familiar patterns in things, that are actually something completely different?

Pareidolia is the term you are looking for. It is often used for the specific case you mention of seeing faces in other objects, but it's actually a more general concept that covers other types of ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
  • 7,481
5 votes
Accepted

Is Tinnitus caused by damage to the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) or Auditory Cortex, which can be repaired?

Short answer Sensory tinnitus is not caused by brain damage, but is due to degeneration of peripheral auditory neurons, and specifically the hair cells in the inner ear. Background Tinnitus can be ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.7k
4 votes

Has there been any serious research on subliminal messaging?

Your question rightly refers to different types of subliminal messaging, and so there is much confusion in this area. This was not helped by James Vicary's fraudulent "Drink Coca-Cola" study. Many ...
Subliminal Today's user avatar
4 votes

Any ideas about the neural mechanism underlying the ASMR sensation?

I found one study that looked at ASMR and the Default Mode Network (DNM). The DMN consists of the medial prefrontal cortex, medial temporal gyri, bilateral inferior parietal cortices, precuneus and ...
queenslug's user avatar
  • 2,416

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