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Short Answer Yes. People estimate time differently, by focusing their attention on time in more or lesser degree. Also within a person, time estimation may vary due to stochastic variations. Long answer This is a really nice paper that tries to explain time-perception in a cognitive architecture called ACT-R. It is a model of human cognition that tries ...


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Cambridge Dictionary defines confusion as "a situation in which people do not understand what is happening, what they should do or who someone or something is." This means that confusion occurs in one's thoughts, in the brain. I define emotion as "an irritation of the heart" or simply "a heart feeling." By heart, I mean a physical heart. Emotion is a heart ...


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Short answer The recent literature shows mounting evidence for beneficial effects of music on cognitive abilities. The big 'but' in the issue is how specific those effects are and whether they will hold up in longitudinal studies. Background Great question. Your citations provided reach back to 2006 so I thought to limit this answer using recent articles ...


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In Maylor, E. A., Rabbitt, P. , James, G. H. and Kerr, S. A.. (1990) Comparing the effects of alcohol and intelligence on text recall and recognition. British Journal of Psychology, Vol.81 (No.3). pp. 299-313. Forty male subjects were divided into two groups on the basis of their scores on a computerized intelligence test administered in a preliminary ...


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I found one 2017 meta-analysis by Sala and Gobet which is probably superior methodologically to the few non-systematic reviews found by AliceD. I say "probably" because the meta-analysis includes quite a few not-directly-IQ transfers, e.g. to math. Nevertheless, they do describe IQ transfers separately... and overall Cohen's d they found for that is ...


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Cognitive dissonance is often a problem when trying to convince someone of your position. Depending on the subject matter and how closely the position is held for the opposing party it can be very difficult to follow even logical well reasoned arguments. The opposing party often has a framework of reality in which they make sense of various situations or ...


3

If I recall correctly, in his book "The number sense", Stanislas Dehaene says that one reason Chinese have better than average math skills is because all digits have only 1 syllable and the number of syllables increases linearly with the number of digits (vs. for example the horrible seventy-seven in English). If I still remember correctly, he cites some ...


3

First, it is important to disambiguate between concurrent multitasking and sequential multitasking (Salvucci et al, 2009). In a recent publication I present a short overview on related work of both (Jeuris and Bardram, 2016): During concurrent multitasking cognitive resources have to be divided across several competing parallel tasks, such as driving ...


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This is not a complete answer, but Abbey et al (2006) might be a good starting point. They summarise some literature: Recent research has focused on alcohol's effects on executive cognitive functioning (ECF) and the capacity to plan, initiate, and alter goal-directed behavior (Bartholow et al., 2003; Curtin and Fairchild, 2003; Giancola, 2004). Acute ...


2

So let me start off by saying that the word dyslexia is a well-defined term describing a condition typically affecting the left angular gyrus. If you're looking for a biological condition that leaves a similar effect on reasoning, I'm afraid you've got in backwards. Humans are rational beings, but that doesn't mean we always, or even often, behave ...


2

Statistical significance in this context is determined by: the underlying size of the group differences, the group sample sizes, and your threshold for statistical significance (traditionally .05). Even if there were very small group differences, if you had a large sample size (say 1000s of people from each race doing an intelligence test), then you would ...


2

Your hypothesis is not quite true. Even if we restrict discussions to numbers only, conciseness (the term used in literature for your "compactness") is not the greatest for the Western system; the Georgian number system is superior in this respect. I'm reproducing the following table from Chrisomalis' book (p. 391). The Roman system, which is essentially ...


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About intelligence: The subject of intelligence is broadly addressed in research in psychology, one of the most supportive theories is Spearman's bifactorial theory of intelligence, in this theory the factor g is a huge stable factor that explains the common variance (in scores) to all the different cognitive tasks that can be put to a person. Although ...


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Affect is a fundamental feature of consciousness and is a mental representation of input from the body to the brain. Affect corresponds to feelings of (un)pleasantness and activation (arousal). Emotions are conceptualizations (interpretations) of your affect in a given context. You might feel pleasant and highly aroused (an affective feeling) on a roller ...


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Just a few comments. The sample size in that study was quite small (n = 144) and there were four conditions. A few fundamental principles of psychology suggest that learning an instrument would not increase IQ in any meaningful way. Within a given society, IQ is heavily influence by genetics, and generally not readily attributable to individual ...


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Intuition is the ability to acquire knowledge without proof, evidence, or conscious reasoning, or without understanding how the knowledge was acquired (Miriam Webster Dictionary; Oxford English Dictionary) Affect is the experience of feeling or emotion. (Hogg, et al. 2010) Emotion is any relatively brief conscious experience characterized by ...


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The effects of multitasking are apparent even for the most trivial tasks. For example try walking and eating a sandwich at the same time, you will walk slower and more irregular. The multitasking effects though, are much less when the competing tasks are simple or familiar. Exctract from this article : In experiments published in 2001, Joshua Rubinstein, ...


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Accroding to the excellent book The Big Book of Concepts by Gregory Murphy, in the prototype view every category is represented by a summary of representation features, with weights for each value of each dimension (e.g. color, hair length). When a new member of the category is encountered we add weights of the present features and subtract the weights of it'...


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The thing that comes to mind first are the Gestalt principles. Up front - the Gestalt theory of perception has been criticized as being a descriptive theory, and not providing much insight into the processes that lead to perception. However, the principles do address your question, as the Gestalt theory dictates that humans visually and psychologically ...


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Schizophrenia symptoms vary widely from patient to patient. Only a subgroup of schizophrenics experience grandiose delusion. According to one school of thought, humanistic psychotherapy, individuals have different degrees of congruence between the self and the ideal self, with consequences for self-realization. If one thinks to much of one self, one risks ...


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Freshness is a term which is widely used to identify odors. The olfactive stimuli which is trigerred by fragrant materials like citruses, aromatics( lavender, rosemary), peppermints or green materials (like leafs or grass) these are more volatile groups they are light molecules and usually refer to freshness. But the cool or fresh sensation not just come ...


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