28 votes

Is there scientific evidence on the benefits of binaural beats?

Since I was asked in chat about binaural beats, and have been posed this question a number of times before besides, I looked into the most recent literature using Google Scholar for the single term &...
13 votes
Accepted

Why do people who stutter have less difficulty singing than speaking?

Short answer Singing increases the duration of voiced intervals in stutterers. Background Singing is an example of one of the most effective methods to decrease stuttering* (Stager, 2003). It is a so-...
  • 20.3k
12 votes

How do we hear our inner voice?

No, inner speech does not follow the same neural pathway as speech coming in from outside. Rather, inner speech uses the same neural mechanism as outer speech - that is, speech going out. The neural ...
  • 18.8k
11 votes

Is there a difference between hearing and decoding the sound?

Short answer Yes, there is a difference between hearing and understanding sound. Background Acoustic information is processed in different neural centers along the auditory pathway. The ...
  • 20.3k
11 votes
Accepted

What is the information storage capacity of the human brain?

Disclaimer: Quantifying the capacity of the human brain is quiet complex as you might imagine. And although in cognitive neuroscience we often compare the brain to computers this is not an exact ...
  • 1,165
9 votes
Accepted

Can a brain be modeled as a simplified interaction of different states and their triggers?

My answer is probably a weird hodgepodge of sometimes poorly explained stuff, but hopefully it's coherent enough :P For many decades in psychology, we've had a mechanistic stimulus-organism-response ...
  • 4,357
9 votes
Accepted

Can music be addictive?

According to the article "Addiction to Music Has Biochemical Basis" on Softpedia News by Tudor Vieru, which reports on findings by Robert Zatorre and Valorie Salimpoor (Salimpoor & ...
9 votes
Accepted

If I think of a checkerboard, is there a similar structure to see in my visual cortex?

Probably. What you mentioned in your question is called retinotopy. There is a mapping between locations on your retina and areas on your cortex. As you go further up the visual processing streams, ...
  • 981
8 votes

What brain wave states are associated with hypnosis?

Hypnotic states are associated with increased theta wave activity. Hypnotically susceptible participants also exhibit hemispheric beta wave asymmetry, but non-susceptible participants do not (Sabourin,...
8 votes
Accepted

Using IT to quickly make a simulated brain

This is an incredibly broad question, but I admire your spark of curiosity so I'm going to give you a quick answer anyways. Firstly, there is no defined steps for modelling parts of the brain. The ...
  • 8,793
8 votes

Is praying the Catholic rosary a meditation and does it enhance brain plasticity?

The accepted method of praying the Rosary is to actually complete five (5) decades, each containing the Hail Mary (Ave Maria) repeated 10 times (hence the term "decade"). Each decade is followed by an ...
  • 81
8 votes
Accepted

Can you get sad by sniffing onions, just like you can get happy by forcing yourself to smile?

I assume you're referring to the experiment by Strack, Martin, and Stepper (1988) in which people rated a cartoon as funnier when they had to hold their face in a smile shape by gripping a pencil in ...
  • 361
7 votes

What cognitive processes occur during a mental exhaustion or 'burnout'?

One of the older theories suggested that a person literally runs out of brain-fuel when they hit the wall (Baumeister et al, 1998). They called this state "ego depletion" and it refers to the kind of ...
  • 71
7 votes

What is the neurological basis of maintaining self discipline?

Studies have shown that some people can mentally isolate stressors so that they do not affect performance in other areas. This is sometimes referred to as isolating or repressing the memory of the ...
7 votes
Accepted

Can hallucinogens treat depressive states?

Most of the 'true' hallucinogens are classified as 5HT2A agonists. 5HT2A is a postsynaptic serotonin receptor. Serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) on the other hand act by increasing ...
  • 20.3k
7 votes

Are there mental reflexes?

There are 2 common definitions of "reflex": The technical definition of "reflex" is an action that is not voluntary - ie, not mediated by cognition. From Wikipedia: ... sensory neurons do not ...
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7 votes
Accepted

What's the difference between repetition suppression and habituation?

The two concepts are analogous and mutually illustrative, but empirically refer to different levels of analysis: behavioral and neural. Habituation Habituation is a form of non-associative learning, ...
7 votes

Is it possible to erase problematic memories?

The notion of "selective memory loss" as erasing problematic memories presumes the existence of engrams, which is a theoretical localized, biological basis for memory. Despite exhaustive searching, we ...
7 votes

Is it possible to erase problematic memories?

A phenomenon called "memory reconsolidation" has received considerable attention over the last 15 years. This is about activation (retrieval) causing memories to temporarily enter a labile state in ...
7 votes

What is "Attention" in terms of brain activity?

Firstly its important to note that attention basically the outcome of automatic processes, although attention may easily be directed by conscious choices. As a previous poster mentioned the ...
  • 1,165
7 votes

What is the neurophysiological mechanism behind double hearing?

Short answer Damage to the inner ear can result in an asymmetric distortion in pitch perception between the two ears. This phenomenon can result in the same tone being perceived as a different pitch ...
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7 votes
Accepted

Is there a neural network model of Pavlovian Learning?

In general, what you're looking for is a biologically plausible model of reinforcement learning and/or conditioning. I know of two publications in particular that address this. The first is A ...
  • 8,793
7 votes

Can LSD connect sensory regions in the brain?

The phenomenon you are referring to is called synesthesia, which can be defined as (Sinke et al., 2012): Synesthesia (Greek: syn = together; aesthesis = perception) is [...] a crossing of sensory ...
  • 20.3k
7 votes

What is the computational role of the cortical column?

Cortical columns are groups of neurons in the brain that are oriented perpendicularly to the cortical surface. Cells within a column respond to the same stimulus property (Fig. 1). For example, ...
  • 20.3k
7 votes

Is quick left brain vs right brain test fake?

Without references, you state: In this picture if you noticed her rotating clockwise you are right brain dominant. We discourage asking questions on this site (or in science in general) which ...
  • 3,493
6 votes
Accepted

Do the colour blind have a distinct visual cortex structure?

Interesting question! I performed a fairly extensive search in Google Scholar and Scopus using various keyword searches, including, but not limited to "color blindness and plasticity", "color blind ...
  • 20.3k
6 votes

Is there a difference between hearing and decoding the sound?

It is well documented that people are able to selectively attend to different speakers. The ability to tune-in to a particular speaker and filter out others was dubbed the cocktail party effect, since ...
6 votes

Are there any studies (fMRI scans, etc) showing why some people (supposedly) are more open to hypnotism?

Overall, while there are developing cognitive neuroscience theories of how hypnotic states are produced, there does not appear to be any known cognitive neuroscience basis for individual differences ...

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