9 votes

Is it possible that people perceive time differently than others do?

Short Answer Yes. People estimate time differently, by focusing their attention on time in more or lesser degree. Also within a person, time estimation may vary due to stochastic variations. Long ...
Robin Kramer-ten Have's user avatar
7 votes

How does the inner ear encode sound intensity?

Short answer Hair cells in the cochlea can code sound intensity via the amount of neurotransmitter they release. Higher sound levels result in more neurotransmitter release and in turn to higher ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.6k
7 votes

If the color black reflects no light, how are we able to see it?

Objects are visually perceived when they reflect light. A black object does not reflect any light. In other words, no photons are reflected to be detected by the photoreceptors in the retina. A black ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.6k
7 votes
Accepted

What are the temporal limits of the auditory system?

As far as I know, auditory clicks are the shortest possible auditory stimuli. The shortest auditory click I was able to find in the literature, and which was used in a psychophysical context (i.e., ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.6k
7 votes
Accepted

How do hair cells recognize frequencies?

Short answer Population activity in auditory neurons allows rate coding of soundwaves with frequencies that exceed the firing rate limit. Place coding is, however, believed to be the most important ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.6k
6 votes

What are the temporal limits of the auditory system?

In terms of the shortest stimuli, the auditory system can process acoustic impulses, but defining the duration of an impulse is problematic. As the duration of the impulse gets shorter, the bandwidth ...
StrongBad's user avatar
  • 2,633
5 votes
Accepted

Is V1 involved in visual imagery?

Short answer V1 can be recruited for visual imagery, but it is not strictly needed for imagery to occur, and it is not sufficient in itself to allow for visual imagery. Background Visual imagery is a ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.6k
5 votes
Accepted

What regulates the strength of motor signals?

Short answer Muscles are controlled by motor neurons in the spinal cord. The number of motor neurons that fire, as well as their individual firing rates govern the control of muscle force. Background ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.6k
5 votes

Is there a standard definition of a "hallucination"?

Elliot et al. (2008) define a hallucination as: A sensory experience which occurs in the absence of corresponding external stimulation of the relevant sensory organ, has sufficient sense of reality ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.6k
5 votes
Accepted

How does the brain project pain on to a particular part of the body?

Short answer Peripheral sensory information is projected unidirectionally to the brain. A sensory strip of the brain contains a topographical representation of the surface of the body that facilitates ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.6k
5 votes
Accepted

Difference between thoughts and sensations

Short answer Sensations are different from thoughts and are separated in the spatial and temporal domain. The distinction between thoughts and perceptions, however, is less well defined, but can still ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.6k
5 votes
Accepted

Is there a difference between physiological stimulations and psychological stimulations?

Psychology and physiology are at different levels of explanation or levels of analysis. The answer depends entirely on how you view the relationship between such levels and in particular (mental) ...
Jonas Lindeløv's user avatar
5 votes

Is "haptodysphoria" an urban legend or is there another term under which this studied?

Apparently "sensory over-responsivity" is a more widely used term: Sensory over-responsivity, a subtype of sensory modulation disorder, is characterized by extreme negative reactions to normative ...
the gods from engineering's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Do we perceive contrast colour patterns easily because of adaptation?

Short answer Contrast is hardwired in the visual system and can be explained by retinal and brain connectivities without the need for adaptive processes. My answer pertains to adaptation at the ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.6k
4 votes
Accepted

How long does it take to learn to cane travel?

Short answer Generally, a few months of active, guided training. Background Based on an article from a guide cane instructor who is a cane traveler himself, I can answer the question as follows: ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.6k
4 votes

Any ideas about the neural mechanism underlying the ASMR sensation?

I found one study that looked at ASMR and the Default Mode Network (DNM). The DMN consists of the medial prefrontal cortex, medial temporal gyri, bilateral inferior parietal cortices, precuneus and ...
queenslug's user avatar
  • 2,416
4 votes

Is our sense of smell heightened when we are asleep?

Short answer The sense of smell may still be operational during sleep, but it is not enhanced. Olfactory stimuli typically will not wake you up during sleep, however. Background Olfaction and sleep ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.6k
4 votes

I have developed a self-regulation system that allows change at the physiological level. Does it have any merit?

I'm not going to answer the question I think you want answered: whether your system has merit. Instead, I'm going to answer a related question that I think you actually need answered: How do you ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
  • 7,376
3 votes

What explains the characteristics of the receptive fields of simple cells in V1?

The retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and the neurons in the upstream lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) both have relatively simple receptive fields that are organized in in a center-surround fashion (Fig. ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.6k
3 votes
Accepted

Do people with birth defects feel phantom limbs?

Here is a link to an article that discusses the very thing. Specifically, it discusses a case study conducted by Paul McGeoch and V.S. Ramachandran on a woman whose hand was amputated at 18, but who ...
mflo-ByeSE's user avatar
  • 1,283
3 votes
Accepted

Is there knowledge of the receptive field patterns of cortical columns in associative brain regions?

Short answer Associative brain areas are not retinotopically organized. Only lower visual areas more upstream from these areas are organized in such a predictable, low-level way. Higher up, things get ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.6k
3 votes

What causes the sensation of taste when Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO) is absorbed through the skin?

Short answer It may not be so much the direct action of DMSO on the olfactory sensory system, but the smell of one of its metabolites that is excreted via the pulmonary system and the skin after ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.6k
3 votes
Accepted

Is Paul's Churchland claim about qualia supported by science?

Read further down to The neural basis of qualia V.S. Ramachandran and Edward Hubbard of the Center for Brain and Cognition at UCSD argue that Mary might do one of three things upon seeing a ...
the gods from engineering's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

What is a sensorimotor connection in plain English?

The Merriam Webster Dictionary defines the word sensorimotor to be: of, relating to, or functioning in both sensory and motor aspects of bodily activity and the following relating to the tags you ...
Chris Rogers's user avatar
  • 12.2k
3 votes

Can thought processes be sensed to happen exactly in the head?

In the 4th century BC, Aristotle wrote that the source of intelligence was the heart (source). Other greeks like Alcmaeon of Croton thought it might be the brain. I think the fact that they were ...
Zlira's user avatar
  • 141
3 votes

Does the human eye have a muscle that if paralyzed would make us only see things that are in motion?

Short answer Eye musculature takes care of the movements of the eye, including microsaccades that prevent retinal fading (adaptation). If microsaccades are inhibited by inactivating the eye muscles, ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.6k
3 votes

What is the "nails on a chalkboard" response?

English and German speakers lack a single accessible linguistic label for the pattern of aversive reactions termed by Spanish speaking individuals as ‘grima’, whereas the elicitors of other emotions ...
Chris Rogers's user avatar
  • 12.2k
3 votes
Accepted

What are the biological reasons for hearing loss?

Short answer Age-related hearing loss is caused by the loss of hair cells in the inner ear, i.e., in the peripheral nervous system. Background Hearing declines with age and, typically, high ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.6k
2 votes

Does the retina contribute in distinguishing lines and borders?

Short answer Yes, retinal circuitry enhances the perception of contrast. Background In the retina, the neurons that guide the visual signal to the brain, the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), process ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.6k

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