12 votes

How do we hear our inner voice?

No, inner speech does not follow the same neural pathway as speech coming in from outside. Rather, inner speech uses the same neural mechanism as outer speech - that is, speech going out. The neural ...
Arnon Weinberg's user avatar
  • 19.6k
7 votes

Why do people tap their foot to music?

Short Answer: People tap their feet due to increased activity in the cerebellum. Detailed Answer: There already is some evidence that music can release certain neurotransmitters, including ...
Ebbinghaus's user avatar
7 votes

What is the difference between noise reduction and noise cancellation?

Let's start with the terminologies in your question: Loudness: The level (amplitude) of the sound. The higher the sound level, the louder it is perceived. Loudness is measured on a dB scale, e.g. dBA ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.6k
7 votes

How does the inner ear encode sound intensity?

Short answer Hair cells in the cochlea can code sound intensity via the amount of neurotransmitter they release. Higher sound levels result in more neurotransmitter release and in turn to higher ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.6k
7 votes
Accepted

What are the temporal limits of the auditory system?

As far as I know, auditory clicks are the shortest possible auditory stimuli. The shortest auditory click I was able to find in the literature, and which was used in a psychophysical context (i.e., ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.6k
7 votes
Accepted

How can someone asleep recognize a very brief sound?

Short answer The auditory system remains active during sleep. Background Filtering of sensory input during sleep is a recognized phenomenon and indeed the senses are typically lulled during sleep. ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.6k
7 votes
Accepted

How do hair cells recognize frequencies?

Short answer Population activity in auditory neurons allows rate coding of soundwaves with frequencies that exceed the firing rate limit. Place coding is, however, believed to be the most important ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.6k
6 votes

What are the temporal limits of the auditory system?

In terms of the shortest stimuli, the auditory system can process acoustic impulses, but defining the duration of an impulse is problematic. As the duration of the impulse gets shorter, the bandwidth ...
StrongBad's user avatar
  • 2,633
6 votes
Accepted

How do congenitally deaf and mute people think?

Short answer The inner voice of congenitally (pre-lingually) deaf people who have not received treatment like cochlear implantation, is not sound-based. Instead, it is mainly based on visual images, ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.6k
6 votes
Accepted

How does speed listening work?

Your question made me think of JAWS, a screen reader for the blind. I have worked with visually impaired people for a while and I have always wondered how on earth they can understand the speech ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.6k
5 votes

How does speed listening work?

There is probably not a large difference from what occurs during normal listening--and that is likely why speed listening is effective: a. The reason it "feels" normal is the same that any other ...
eyeExWhy's user avatar
  • 536
5 votes
Accepted

Is mapping sound frequencies to the vertical axis universal?

Humans technically don't perceive frequencies, they perceive pitch. According to Wikipedia: the idiom relating vertical height to sound pitch is shared by most languages. citing a 1930 article by ...
the gods from engineering's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Is Tinnitus caused by damage to the dorsal cochlear nucleus (DCN) or Auditory Cortex, which can be repaired?

Short answer Sensory tinnitus is not caused by brain damage, but is due to degeneration of peripheral auditory neurons, and specifically the hair cells in the inner ear. Background Tinnitus can be ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.6k
5 votes
Accepted

Why do psychologists tend to associate guilt with auditory admonition?

The book is available free online in Open Library and the Wolfram Eberhard reference seems to refer to Helen Lynd, On Shame and the Search for Identity" (New York, 1961), p. 207 The 1961 copy ...
Chris Rogers's user avatar
  • 12.2k
4 votes

Why do people tap their foot to music?

The short answer is that it is pleasurable. Recent research from Witek et al (2014) sheds light on this. Their research on affective response and desire to move when listening to funk drum breaks ...
SioKCronin's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Is it possible to condition oneself to not be bothered by distressing sounds?

Short answer Meditation may be key to block out distracting noise. Background One study has shown that during meditation, expert meditators with over 19,000 h of meditation experience show less ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.6k
3 votes

Is speech perceived as set of phonemes by human?

Phonemes are the smallest units of speech sound, usually about 20 to 60 in number, and different for each language (1). They are what letter are to words, actually alphabetic writing systems are ...
DesignerAnalyst's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Can binaural beats be generated with carrier tones outside the audible frequency range?

Short answer No, infrasonic or ultrasonic sound cannot generate binaural beats. Background Binaural beats are generated in the brain and are associated with the frequency bands of the EEG. Binaural ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.6k
3 votes

What is the maximum time difference to still associate an acoustic and visual event?

Short answer In the case of simple stimuli, visual and auditory stimuli can be offset between 25 and 50 ms and still be perceived as coming from one and the same same event. Background The question ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.6k
3 votes
Accepted

Interclick interval resolution of the ear

There have been studies on this, both with paired clicks and long streams of clicks. Normal listeners can detect changes of the sort you describe with essentially perfect reliability down to about 45 ...
TheBlackCat's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Why I read by hearing the words?

When I read a book I tend to read the words but to also hear them in my mind Inner Speech is the general name given to this phenomenon,1 although it also goes by imagined speech, silent speech or ...
Keno's user avatar
  • 597
3 votes

Proportion of cortex dedicated for vision and hearing

20-30% vision. See Sheth & Young (2016) which cites Van Essen (2003). 27% vision, 8% auditory (Van Essen, 2003) I have seen some earlier references that say 50%. I think this derives from two ...
Brian's user avatar
  • 31
3 votes
Accepted

What are the biological reasons for hearing loss?

Short answer Age-related hearing loss is caused by the loss of hair cells in the inner ear, i.e., in the peripheral nervous system. Background Hearing declines with age and, typically, high ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.6k
2 votes

Hard to think when hearing audible speech

There are many things at work here. A lot of your sensitivity to human voice can be attributed to the tonotopic organization of the basilar membrane. Check out this image of the cochlea and notice how ...
RECURSIVE FARTS's user avatar
2 votes

Do non-human primates exhibit the Kiki/Bouba effect?

Short answer As far as I can see, testing the existence of the kiki/bouba effect in primates is technically impossible, because of their lack of speech and/or potential bias due to training effects ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.6k
2 votes

Interclick interval resolution of the ear

From mental chronometry studies, I would venture that 160 - 190 ms would be a reasonable lower limit for the deviation of a beat for a trained subject( i.e the time it takes to process the stimulus), ...
Keno's user avatar
  • 597
2 votes

Does self-directed speech help or hurt a blind subject's auditory recognition?

It seems apparent that generating and hearing self-directed speech during discriminatory listening would inhibit said discrimination. This is because auditory processing of self-directed speech and ...
Default picture's user avatar
2 votes

Blocking out unwanted sound sources

You're not really blocking them out. It's more that you're processing the language of the person you're focusing on. You could do exactly what you describe at reasonably high volume levels. Though ...
Reed Rawlings's user avatar
2 votes

What is the difference between noise reduction and noise cancellation?

I'm not sure but you what you might want to learn is phase cancellation. Sound is a wave, the compression and dilatation of the air between the source of noise and your ears. If you add another sound,...
JSFDude's user avatar
  • 41
2 votes

Does "hearing" give off an electronic signal?

No there isn't any output for these bones other than mechanically pushing against the oval window. In short: Sound waves travel through the ear canal. They hit the ear drum (Tympanic membrane). The ...
Izhaki's user avatar
  • 1,115

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