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Antoine Tremblay has just released an advanced analysis toolbox: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/psyp.12299/abstract It's missing about half the features on your list, although fundamentally, spectral density is a simple task and LORETA is a stand-alone package anyways (although similar approaches, e.g. general CSD estimation, are implemented in ...


9

To calculate $d'$ you need to know two things: the hit rate and the false alarm rate. The hit rate is the proportion of trials where the stimulus was present and the subject responded that the stimulus was present. The false alarm rate is the proportion of trials where the stimulus was not present, and the subject responded that the stimulus was present. ...


7

In general, from my extensive experience, using a four or a five point response scale is not going to change much the psychometric properties of a typical psychological self-report scale (e.g., reliability and factor loadings). I also imagine that if you were to measure a multi-item scale with a four point version and a five point version that the ...


7

Short answer IQ scores are distributed normally, because they follow the central limit theorem. Background When we measure IQ scores in sufficiently large populations, they will be normally distributed. This holds for healthy controls, as well as groups of people with ADHD or reading disabilities (Kaplan et al., 2000), and also in people with mild to ...


7

This is complicated. There's no easy answer, but the outlook for replicability/reproducibility of a lot of the empirical evidence is not great. The R-index (that the blog authors use to rank the chapters) is itself a heuristic, which shouldn't be taken as statistical evidence that a study will necessarily fail to replicate. That being said, it could ...


6

The F ratio statistic has a numerator and denominator degrees of freedom. Thus, you report: F (numerator_df, denominator_df) = F_value, p = ..., effect size = ... The numerator degrees of freedom relates to the factor of interest; the denominator degrees of freedom corresponds to the degrees of freedom for the error variance. The exact way that these ...


6

In Stevens' levels of measurement framework, the NASA-TLX is an ordinal scale, not an interval scale, because there is no way to know a priori how much "workload" each point corresponds to. In other words, we can only know how much workload a point corresponds to after observing the data from our sample. Indeed, Hart's own review of the NASA-TLX suggests ...


6

ANOVA and t-tests are statistical tests for significance and therefore quantitative. The other mentioned items are scales (adding numbers to a certain choice) and therefore they can be considered as ordinal scales, and hence as quantitative as they are based on numbers. The NASA one can be administered by using a sliding scale which can be considered to ...


6

It's important to distinguish between measures and analyses, because only analyses can be quantitative or qualitative, not measures. Measures are, essentially, systematic processes by which we acquire our data, and analyses are processes we use to look at the data. As a rule of thumb, the difference is not hard to find and is given in the name: ...


6

The APA style manual does not provide specific guidelines for linear mixed models. Additionally, a review of studies using linear mixed models reported that the psychological papers surveyed differed 'substantially' in how they reported on these models (Barr, Levy, Scheepers and Tily, 2013). It depends greatly on your study, in other words. Normatively ...


5

I'm not sure I can give you the data purely for physical attractiveness, but what has been intensively researched is passionate love, which includes physical attraction. Passionate love is usually assumed to include sexual desire, and correlates quite well with rated attraction. As Hatfield writes: Generally, passionate love is associated with the terms “...


5

How many trials do you have per condition? With a small number of trials in the deviant condition, and a small number of participants, these things can happen. The ISI would not cause this per se, however, have you considered looking at effects of the previous trial? You can analyze the baseline intervals as a function of what type the previous trial was, ...


5

Not entirely sure what specific stats you'd be interested in, but Wikipedia has plenty on prevalences of specific mental disorders. For anxiety disorders, which include obsessive compulsive disorder: A review that pooled surveys in different countries up to 2004 found overall average prevalence estimates for any anxiety disorder of 10.6% (in the 12 months ...


5

The numbers inside the parentheses are the degrees of freedom for the F-statistic. The second number is the within-group degrees of freedom. When you have the same number of subjects in all conditions, then the second number will be the number of subjects - the number of cells (conditions) in your design.


5

General reporting recommendations such as that of APA Manual apply. One should report exact p-value and an effect size along with its confidence interval. In the case of likelihood ratio test one should report the test's p-value and how much more likely the data is under model A than under model B. Example: The data is 7.3, 95% CI [6.8,8.1] times more ...


5

Short answer In psychophysical tests, often %correct rates are determined. Hence, training effects are often measured by determining correct rates. The ultimate outcome measures can be wildly variable, as they are dependent on the physical characteristics of the stimulus (visual, auditory, tactile, gustatory etc). Background Learning curves can be measured ...


5

Short answer From an ethical standpoint, not including interim evaluations may be bad practice. Background I will start off with a more extreme case than in your question example, just for illustrative purposes, namely that of a clinical intervention study. If it appears that the treatment group (say, experimental medicine Y, instead of the standard of care ...


5

gjacob is correct that optional stopping is a common research degree of freedom, and one that has a considerable and unfortunate intuitive basis. Yet, depending on the context of your research, AliceD's concerns are also important. There is, however, a middle ground between not checking at all, and p-hacking: sequential analysis. There is a Bayesian version ...


5

I wrote a paper that focuses on this question (Anglim & Grant, 2014; pre-print is https://osf.io/g8kbj/download). In short, if you're interested in estimating how well facets predict an outcome, then you should include all facets as predictors. Likewise, if you want to estimate the incremental prediction of facets over domains (e.g., 30 facets over the ...


5

There are various loosely-defined 'camps' among reform-minded methodologists, so you probably want to try to follow a representative of each. Andrew Gelman is a prominent landmark in this area, and runs a really nice frequently-updated blog at statmodeling.stat.columbia.edu with frequent paper critiques. The JASP crew also have a blog, https://www....


5

While not a peer-reviewed study per se, but the DSM-5 says that the prevalence of Narcissistic Personality Disorder in the population is 6.2%, or approximately one out of sixteen members of the population (6.25%). The DSM-V was published in 2013 and is a peer-reviewed text, so it is within the 10 year criteria you mentioned and this fact is mentioned in more ...


4

I am particularly concerned with whether or not the task load index could be considered an interval variable, Yup. This is a fundamental assumption people make when constructing, administering and analyzing any measure under the classical test theory (CTT) paradigm i.e. count items and add 'em up. That is to say, your variable is certainly treated as ...


4

The index of sensitivity $d'$ is typically defined in terms of two equal variance normally distributed random variables with means $\mu_s$ and $\mu_n$ and standard deviation $\sigma$: $$d'=\frac{\mu_s-\mu_n}{\sigma}$$ In behavioural experiments, the probability that the subjects responded correctly (either saying 'yes' when the signal was present or saying ...


4

What you are referring to is something called dissociative fugue. It is characterized as an official psychiatric disorder and dissociative disorder in the DSM-5, and its prevalence has been estimated at 0.2%, though it is much more common in connection with wars, accidents, and natural disasters. The disorder is characterized by reversible amnesia for all ...


4

It is partly as you already guessed, because the phenomena that are studied don't vary as much between individuals. This doesn't necessarily mean that individual differences in perception are smaller, it means that individual differences in those aspects of perception that are studied in psychophysics are smaller. Another reason is that it is customary in ...


4

To answer the question relating to start values for the parameters for use with fitdist: I would like to check for an ex-gaussian distribution fit (GAMLSS package), but the fitdist function ask for "start" parameters and I have no idea how to get them: any help would be much appreciated. Where possible, knowledge of the behavior of similar reaction times ...


3

This article by Whelan (2010) is one of the best introductory papers I've found on the subject. Normalization is covered quite clearly and extensively, including the caveats and "gotchas". References Whelan, R. (2010). Effective analysis of reaction time data. The Psychological Record, 58(3), 9.


3

I guess it depends on your purpose. If you are doing the MDS for more heuristic purposes, then often two dimensions (or possibly three) will provide the greatest visual insight. Also, my sense from looking at your dimension by stress plot is that the greatest gains are attained when going from one to two dimensions, that the gain from two to three ...


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