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6 votes
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Why do colors affect emotion?

Our emotional responses to colors is based on two factors : innate behavior and acquired behavior (aslo known as nature and nurture). Innate behavior is build in our genes, it is instinctive and ...
DesignerAnalyst's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

How do we know what colors animals perceive?

There are some levels of confusion in this in question, but basically we can test what wavelengths animals perceive (simple behavioral tests, e.g. training & testing them to distinguish a certain ...
against very long user names's user avatar
4 votes

Importance of colors in learning process?

You asked for an article that discusses the latest discoveries about how visualization, specially colors and moving images are important in the process of learning....It would be nice to know about ...
Chris Rogers's user avatar
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3 votes

Can color blindness be treated with image filtering technology?

Short answer Lost spectral sensitivity in bichromats or monochromats cannot be made up for by technology. The only thing technology can do is to process the visual image and shift its spectral content ...
AliceD's user avatar
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3 votes
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Is Paul's Churchland claim about qualia supported by science?

Read further down to The neural basis of qualia V.S. Ramachandran and Edward Hubbard of the Center for Brain and Cognition at UCSD argue that Mary might do one of three things upon seeing a ...
against very long user names's user avatar
2 votes
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Is synesthesia tied to experience?

Can synesthesia make a person feel "new" color (or any other experience)? The answer may be yes. You can find this quote “V. S. Ramachandran and E. M. Hubbard (in their 2001 PRSL paper) described a ...
user287279's user avatar
  • 1,825
1 vote

How is 'purple' both ligt at one wavelength and the sum of light at two different wavelengths?

This was pointed out by Newton after his investigation with prisms. A color can be the result of a single wavelength, or the combination of different lights with different wavelengths, called ...
tlGNDa's user avatar
  • 11
1 vote
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Does our conscious experience of world match the world as it IS or as it presents itself?

The two paragraphs are saying the same thing; I think Pinker is making a bit of a grandiose philosophical statement in the meaning of "the world as it is", but it makes sense if we give that ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
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1 vote
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What scientific evidence is there for the definable real world quality of redness independent our perception?

Short answer None. Background First off, I am not familiar with the principles as laid out in your question posed by Goethe and Feigenbaum (I'll look into these people, thanks for the pointer!). ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.7k
1 vote

Are there any definitions of the perception & JND of the colour of light approximately like how the Weber Law defines it for the brightness of light?

Most obervers can differentiate about a million different colors (Halsey & Chapanis, 1951). Generally this is referred to as the JND of hue. The difference between the definition of color and hue ...
AliceD's user avatar
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1 vote
Accepted

Why does "bulk" yellow ink look red?

Not all liquid or things that are yellow become red when they exist in large quantity. For example, beer, vegetable oil, and normal urine never look red even in large quantity, like in a vat. It ...
user287279's user avatar
  • 1,825
1 vote

Why is deltaE not used as a measure of error?

Short answer To me, it seems perfectly feasible to use deltaE both as dependent and independent variable of color difference. Background DeltaE (Fig. 1) can be used to generate the target stimuli by ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.7k
1 vote

Importance of colors in learning process?

Chris' answer is relevant, but possibly digging more into psychology literature than needed for the given question. Note that the articles Chris links to do not state that 'by default' using colors ...
Steven Jeuris's user avatar
  • 3,523
1 vote

Acoustic and light wave coherency?

The answer is YES, light is exactly like sound when it comes to cognitive psychology. We relate to both in the same ways, and no feature of the physics of either acoustics or photonics refutes this. ...
jonaD's user avatar
  • 11

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