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14

My hypothesis: The world accidentally stumbled upon the first (to my knowledge) bi-stable color illusion Here is an example of bistable illusion: This bistable illusion involves the perception of motion. Is the dancer spinning clockwise or counterclockwise? The deal is that the image is actually ambiguous. But you can't possible perceive both clockwise or ...


14

You may want to read Meaidi et al (2014). They obtained dream reports from congenitally blind, late blind, and matched sighted controls. To quote the abstract, they found: All blind participants had fewer visual dream impressions compared to sighted control participants. In late blind participants, duration of blindness was negatively correlated with ...


13

Usually, for something to be 'real', we want it in some reasonable manner to be objective or (because that is extremely vague) at least very consistent across subjective observers. Unfortunately, colour does not satisfy this. Physical basis. As explained very well by @Stop_forgetting_my_account: Physics does not have colour, it just has a continuous ...


11

This question is studied within the fields of color psychology and enclothed cognition (e.g., Adam and Galinsky, 2012), currently a hot/controversial topic in cognitive science. Without addressing the substantial questions surrounding the premises of these interpretations for situated/embodied cognition in my answer, it seems that wearing black is associated ...


9

First I have to say that the wavelengths of light are on a totally different order of magnitude than sound. So the parallel drawn in your question "do light waves, for example one with the same wave length as a mid-C and another with a mid-F wave, look nicely together?" may seem logical, but is on closer inspection not easily maintained. Instead, one way to ...


8

It's a conscious choice, so to truly know why, you'd probably have to ask the sign designers themselves...but I can speculate a bit on reasons one might want to choose red. Red is often associated with appetite, impulsivity, and excitement, all of which a merchant might want to encourage in potential customers. Here are some excerpts [emphasis added] from ...


7

It's difficult to tell. Dreams are very hard to analyse scientifically since they can't be objectively measured, only self-reported. Dreams are notoriously difficult to recall after waking, so it's almost impossible to tell for certain. There are some self-report studies which do assert that some proportion of dreams are in black and white, but this pattern ...


7

It appears that throughout your question you are touching on multiple questions and topics. I will address them in a series of quotes and responses, beginning with the title: Are colors real? They are not physical things. Colors are a form of perception (an abstraction). They exist in your head. In physics the perception of colors is caused by light ...


6

From Stevens & Galanter (1957) Although an extensive investigation of the subjective scale of brightness is still in progress in this laboratory, enough has been learned to show that, for patches of white light viewed in a dark room, subjective brightness is a power function of luminance. Moreover, the exponent is of the order of one-third ...


6

The three levels of the Stroop test you describe are the following: Congruent stimuli Incongruent stimuli Incongruent stimuli alternated with the Reverse Stroop effect


6

Unfortunately, it appears there is currently no research investigating how synaesthetes experience the binaural beats effect. If any such research does exist, it does not appear to be available (in English) via Google Scholar, Web of Science or Scopus. Furthermore, there is little research on binaural beats generally. I covered some of the scarce research ...


5

There is an interesting demonstration in this YouTube video (4:10 minutes) by Jean-Francoir Gariépy which shows a difference in the color perception depending on whether the dress is scanned from the top to the bottom of the image or vice versa. A conclusion from this could be that people scan pictures of dresses in different ways, although an individually ...


5

Our emotional responses to colors is based on two factors : innate behavior and acquired behavior (aslo known as nature and nurture). Innate behavior is build in our genes, it is instinctive and performed without being based upon prior experience (that is, in the absence of learning), and is therefore an expression of innate biological factors. This innate ...


5

There are some levels of confusion in this in question, but basically we can test what wavelengths animals perceive (simple behavioral tests, e.g. training & testing them to distinguish a certain wavelength) inspect their cones to determine what wavelengths they could perceive. The latter doesn't necessarily imply that if an animal has say 4 different ...


4

It's difficult to say why this happened in your particular situation, but one contributing factor may be that color perception is relative. How a particular color is perceived depends on the surrounding colors. The best way to demonstrate this is through an optical illusion: It looks like there are two different color hearts, but all of the hearts are ...


4

You asked for an article that discusses the latest discoveries about how visualization, specially colors and moving images are important in the process of learning....It would be nice to know about a good book about it, but for now I need to start the project and I need an article in first place. There is one free open access article by Lindelani Mnguni (...


3

Short answer Lost spectral sensitivity in bichromats or monochromats cannot be made up for by technology. The only thing technology can do is to process the visual image and shift its spectral content such that it falls outside the deficient region in the color-deficient spectrum. Likewise, trichromats can never match the spectral sensitivity of a ...


3

I don't think inverted prism goggles would be a satisfactory way to empirically test the thought experiment. A key axiom of the argument is that there are no physical changes to our brains or bodies; only the qualia have changed. In a goggles design, there would be a clear physical locus of the change (and we might reasonably call this part of your body for ...


3

To whatever extent colorblindness is a consequence of sensation loss, perceptual loss should necessarily follow. If colorblindness results from diabetes solely due to retinal damage, this means diabetes prevents these two colors from causing different sensory stimulation. If the sensory stimulation is truly the same, it should be perceived the same. A signal ...


3

Comparing the two gets into metaphysics. There have been theories of a 'light octave', since IR to UV is not terribly far from a single octave. Basically, in the standard sense, no, our vision does not perceive harmony in just the same way as our audition does with much lower-frequency sound waves. Newton directly compared the two when he associated the ...


2

This logarithmic increase in order to produce a just noticeable difference between stimuli of two different intensities is in fact a general property or the sensory system. It is known as (Weber-) Fechner's law: Weber's law states that the just-noticeable difference between two stimuli is proportional to the magnitude of the stimuli. Gustav Theodor ...


2

Charles Fletcher, one of my professors as an undergraduate, studies reading comprehension. He once mentioned a program called LiveInk, which he researches. This program is intended to improve comprehension for ordinary English, not programming language, but I don't see why it wouldn't work for programming language as well, to some extent at least. It ...


2

The issue is probably the same as with fruits. Different lights produce different appearance. LED light has been shown to produce daylight appearance. I however can't find a high quality source. http://news.discovery.com/human/led-lights-grocery-shopping-110308.htm


2

I haven't ever seen material which describes links between colors and some knowledge fields. To my mind, it depends on your own experience. But there are a lot of material about common feelings of different colors, that could be helpful for design, for organization of any kind of information. Look here and here.


2

Can synesthesia make a person feel "new" color (or any other experience)? The answer may be yes. You can find this quote “V. S. Ramachandran and E. M. Hubbard (in their 2001 PRSL paper) described a partially colorblind man with letter-color synesthesia who said that when synesthetically stimulated, he saw colors he had never seen with his eyes—he called ...


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