11

Cognitive dissonance theory seems to be exactly what you're looking for. It seeks to explain how and why people hold incongruous or dissonant beliefs. I guess egosyntonic beliefs would be consonant with self, egodystonic would be dissonant. Anyway, I'll just link you to the Wikipedia page: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cognitive_dissonance


9

Generally speaking, yes; it's relatively more common for psychosis to be comorbid with or present after diagnosed Autism. For a good overview of this topic read Autism and Schizophrenia (Yael Dvir, MD and Jean A. Frazier, MD). COS (Child Onset Schizophrenia)—the onset of psychosis before age 13 years—is considered a rare and severe form of schizophrenia....


8

The question you have asked is not a new one. In fact, from the times of classical antiquity, Plato considered artistic creativity as a result of god-given madness. When it comes to popular figures in the arts and sciences, however, it is important to note that the illness is not restricted to them by any means. Lord Byron and Beethoven are said to be manic-...


6

Before I answer this question, I would like to point out that at the bottom of Schizophrenia.com is a disclaimer, and part of it says No health information on Schizophrenia.com, including information about herbal therapies and other dietary supplements, is regulated or evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and therefore the information should not ...


5

I don't think you can rule out that she really is suffering from headaches and dizziness. Just because the doctors can't find a physiological cause doesn't mean that there isn't one.


4

I believe, and I do not know if good quality epidemiological evidence exists, that such situations may trigger abnormal illness representations among medical professionals. Factitious disorders, for instance, I believe could be some way to deflect depression in some individuals. Along with abnormal illness representations could also come abnormal moral ...


4

Regarding schizophrenia and loss of IQ: I don't know how much we can say about the 'loss' of IQ in schizophrenia patients. If anything, it appears to me that a decrease in overall IQ is augmented by the cognitive deficits associated with schizophrenia. This isn't to say that you can't increase your IQ with certain interventions, which I will touch on ...


4

No – at least, they shouldn't be required. Wikipedia describes the DSM-5 as requiring "delusions, hallucinations, or disorganized speech". Delusions are distinct from hallucinations in that they aren't necessarily perceptual in a conventional sense, though both diverge a person's conscious experience from empirical reality. Disorganized speech is ...


4

Unfortunately hallucinations of visual type seldom occur with schizophrenia. When visual hallucinations occur in schizophrenia or more frequently (but still uncommon) in other disorders they are rather unlike a simulation of the current world - e.g. a closed door becoming open in the room. In addition patient in a hallucinatory state is very affectively ...


3

Paraphrenia is a late-onset mental disorder similar to schizophrenia in that it features the positive symptoms of the disease, such as delusions and/or hallucinations, but lacks the negative symptoms, such as the deterioration of intellect or personality. It seems to be an outdated term (source: Psychology Central). Can anyone find a well-focused and ...


3

Yes, there is almost certainly a genetic overlap between schizophrenia and OCD. Quantifying the overlap in variation requires genotyping a large number of individuals, and a lot of this cross-disorder work is done by consortia. The Cross-Disorder Group of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium estimated the genetic correlation due to common polymorphisms ...


3

Something to keep in mind is that anything you hear on TV is that it's probably not completely accurate. Psychosis is not a condition; it's a symptom of a condition. Psychosis can be involved in many psychopathologies, (psychological disorders) with symptoms of a psychosis involved in schizophrenia, depression, PTSD, bi-polar disorder, and many other types ...


3

You need to understand that their experience is highly emotionally significant for them. Not necessarily in a good way, but it is. For affected people it feels true - it "is true". What medications tend to do - they dampen the affective significance, among other things, and people in time become more able to be in touch with ordinary reality. By definition ...


3

The short answer to your question Can a person with delusions completely acknowledge their delusions is yes. But it depends. There are quite a few psychological disorders that have symptoms of delusion or hallucination. Bentall et al. (2009) took a look at the structure of paranoid delusions. They concluded that emotion related and cognitive processes ...


3

A quick Google search reveals some answers such as Atkinson, J. R. (2006). Around half of all deaf people diagnosed with schizophrenia report experiencing “voices,” during which they sense someone communicating with them in the absence of any external stimulus. This closely parallels prevalence rates of auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH) in hearing ...


2

Note, this is not my area, and not medical advice. If you need help with this you should consult an appropriately trained health practitioner. To consult the scientific literature, do a search like "schizoaffective disorder prognosis" on Google Scholar. For example, Robinson et al (1999) provide some relevant empirical data. The sample was 50% female and ...


2

I can offer a case study - Elisabeth Kubler-Ross, creator of the infamous "Kubler-Ross Model" or "five stages of grief" (Denial, Anger, Bargaining, Depression, Acceptance). Her entire career as a psychiatrist was spent working with terminally ill patients and their grieving families. She strongly believed in a life after death and outer-body experiences, and ...


2

The specific revelations about global surveillance schemes that you reference like PRISM and XKeyscore are relatively recent (June 2013), so it looks like it's too early for any research to have been done into the statistical frequency of such symptoms. (I can't find any, at least!) However, some have suggested that the common public knowledge that such ...


2

There is some evidence that thought disorder (also called loose association) arises, at least partially, from increased spreading activation; schizophrenics, for example, often show a greater increase in activation to indirectly related words compared to unrelated words, than do non-thought disordered controls. This is primarily a cognitive mechanism, not a ...


2

Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) is a unique skills training that consists of four modules: core mindfulness, distress tolerance, emotion regulation, and interpersonal effectiveness. Originally, this set of therapeutic skills were developed as treatment for the extremely unmanageable Borderline Personality Disorder. However, after immense success, the ...


2

Just a note to add, or summarise, the above. Of course, results vary from study to study, and more still patient to patient. The standard iq loss, or developmental deficit, is usually estimated at less than 10 points, which is clincally significant, but not necessarily life changing. Working memory is often effected. But of course the illness / disability ...


2

According to the DSM V, for the diagnosis of schizophrenia, the following is necessary: two (or more) of the following, each present for a significant portion of time during a 1-month period (or less if successfully treated): (1) Delusions (2) Hallucinations (3) Disorganized speech (4) Grossly disorganized or catatonic behavior (5) Negative ...


2

Short answer Visual hallucinations in psychotic disorders like schizophrenia are typically not simple transformations of an inanimate lifeless object into another state. They are not a car turning upside down, or a door suddenly opening. Instead, they are often 'de novo' images or scenes, with religious and frightening content and just beyond grasp. ...


2

Short answer Many people in the general populace suffer one or more negative symptoms that are associated with schizophrenia, but are not diagnosed with a mental illness whatsoever. Background Indeed, for a diagnosis of schizophrenia, negative symptoms alone are not enough. According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, (DSM-5), to ...


2

(edit, actually found the book text on Google books and paid a bit more attention to the context; the book is Kaplan & Sadock's Concise Textbook of Clinical Psychiatry by Sadock, Sadock, and Ruiz, and you can find the specific passage by searching for the quoted text) This book is talking about plasma concentrations of drugs. Based on the actual plasma ...


2

Sleep paralysis can sometimes result in hallucinations corollary to the paralysis experience. Similarly, bipolar I and other psychotic disorders (viz. the schizophrenia spectrum) could produce vivid enough hallucinations and delusions, though in general, vivid visual hallucinations are quite rare. It is highly unlikely that someone who is describing these ...


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