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19

It basically depends on how the particular musical performance is perceived by the listener. Cognitive process of listening seems to be comprise several layers, which follows a bottom-up direction. First step is to decode relevant signal(s), among a complex package of sound. This is where the irrelevant noise is eliminated. Can music be eliminated in this ...


11

Here is a study that creates and manipulates the "song stuck in your head" phenomenon. In particular, it is a myth that only "bad" songs are stuck in your head. These songs can be categorized as intrusive thoughts. Also the obvious finding was that recently heard music was more likely to be stuck in your head. The authors comes up with a term called the "...


10

A great overview of this topic is available in Chapter 6 of the book The Invisible Gorilla by Chabris & Simons. My answer is based, in large part, on their summary of the topic. The "Mozart Effect" was originally reported by Rauscher, Shaw, & Ky (1993). In the experiment, college students completed a set of typical IQ tests. Before taking the tests, ...


10

Vitouch et. al (2006) observed that "visual tempo significantly influenced the retrieved music tempo.". Music is known to potentially affect the perception of visual scenes (e. g., Vitouch, 2001), as proficiently demonstrated in the movies. But do films also influence the perception of music? This study investigates cross-modal influences in ...


9

One of the claims that is somewhat easy to validate empirically is that "432 Hz sounds better than 440 Hz." This informal experiment tests this in a straightforward way. People listen to pitch-shifted versions of songs at a variety of different frequencies and rate their preference for the song. Importantly, they don't know which frequency the song has been ...


9

I believe this phenomenon is well known in cognitive science. That is how our memory works. The simpliest explanation would be the Hebbian learning rule: "Neurons that fire together, wire together." So, you can imagine some neurons firing when you hear the music and some when you see the game. Now, if these used to fire together, they are probably connected....


8

Short Answer: People tap their feet due to increased activity in the cerebellum. Detailed Answer: There already is some evidence that music can release certain neurotransmitters, including dopamine. You can assume that people who tap their feet to the music, are in someway "pleased" by the music, meaning that their body goes into some sort of ...


7

According to the article "Addiction to Music Has Biochemical Basis" on Softpedia News by Tudor Vieru, which reports on findings by Robert Zatorre and Valorie Salimpoor (Salimpoor & Zatorre, 2013), who both hold appointments as neuroscientists at the McGill University: "listening to music you like also triggers the release of dopamine, a neurotransmitter ...


7

Well it depends what you mean by "field of study", but yes there is significant Cognitive Science research on Music and emotional arousal and/or brain activity. In particular Cognitive Neuroscience is most relevant to actually mapping brain activations involved with various forms of music appreciation and creation. A good study specifically on music and ...


6

As mentioned in a recent study by Thompson et al. (2012), there are two perspectives which account for the effects of background music on reading comprehension specifically (but as I argue later, these seem generalizable): the Cognitive-Capacity hypothesis and the Arousal-Mood hypothesis. In short, the potential cost of background music listening for ...


6

This answer is meant to add more information in addition to the one above. Also, I have not seen the original comment thread, and apologize in advance if I have given redundant information. Fields that look at music and the brain Researchers in many fields have an interest in understand how music is processed by the brain and more particularly how emotion ...


6

Short answer The recent literature shows mounting evidence for beneficial effects of music on cognitive abilities. The big 'but' in the issue is how specific those effects are and whether they will hold up in longitudinal studies. Background Great question. Your citations provided reach back to 2006 so I thought to limit this answer using recent articles ...


5

There is a clear association between musical ability and mathematical ability, perhaps best recognised in savantism in people with developmental disabilities. There are limited domains in which savantism appears to occur, including mathematical calculations, reproducing music instantly, recalling specific facts, and perfect-perspective drawing. There are a ...


5

I wouldn't call it a disorder, unless it significantly affects your life. Not enjoying music or not being able to produce music is known as "amusia". It probably has to do with differences in perceiving pitch [1]. It can also occur in people with recently fitted hearing aids or cochlear implants [2]. If you are interested in this, there is a chapter about ...


5

Music is known as a form of an abstract stimulus, which can arouse feelings of euphoria, similar to tangible rewards that involve the striatal (corpus striatum) dopamine system. In a study, published in nature neuroscience, researchers used the neurochemical specificity of 11C Raclopride positron emission tomography scanning, combined with ...


5

The short answer is that it is pleasurable. Recent research from Witek et al (2014) sheds light on this. Their research on affective response and desire to move when listening to funk drum breaks showed that "syncopation seems to be an important structural factor in embodied and affective responses to groove". Here is their full PLOS article: http://...


5

The phenomenom you describe is called Mere-exposure effect : The mere-exposure effect is a psychological phenomenon by which people tend to develop a preference for things merely because they are familiar with them. In social psychology, this effect is sometimes called the familiarity principle. The effect has been demonstrated with many kinds of ...


5

Wearing those big headphone is indirectly a way to isolate yourself from the surrounding sound. That is usually a prelude for relaxation, or meditation. (In people with audiotory disorder, or with authism, this is a way they can feel good as that remove a big source of stimulis) On the other side for the heavy metal, study have found it can be a stress ...


5

Humans technically don't perceive frequencies, they perceive pitch. According to Wikipedia: the idiom relating vertical height to sound pitch is shared by most languages. citing a 1930 article by Pratt, which in turn says that: Stumpf has found that adjectives meaning high and low (or words closely related in meaning) have been applied to tones in ...


4

Janata's (2009) study might be of interest to you. Specifically the paper proposes that the Media Pre-Frontal Cortex (MPFC) "...associates music and memories when we experience emotionally salient episodic memories that are triggered by familiar songs from our personal past." References: Janata, P. (2009). The neural architecture of music-evoked ...


4

I would read this paper, its mighty interesting. Books Snyder, B.(2000) Music and memory: An introduction. The MIT Press. Cambridge 291. Hemispheric Coordination and Conflict "...while listening to the melody of the popular carol "Silent Night", the right hemisphere thinks, "Ah, yes, Silent Night", while the left hemisphere thinks, "two sequences: ...


4

As your luck would have it, there is a study by Schwartz et al. (2003) that examines just that. They found that there was a specific personality type associated with music preference in adolescents. The paper is freely available on familywise.ca. Schwartz, K. D., & Fouts, G. T. (2003). Music preferences, personality style, and developmental issues of ...


3

This may be happening due to beat entrainment. Different music genres have different beat and rhythm patterns. The ones that are calming will generally have a lower beat and rhythm frequencies. The lower beat and rhythm frequencies are similar to the frequency of heartbeat and breathing when a person is feeling calm and/or relaxed. Through the process of ...


3

Research suggests that endurance is improved when movements are synchronized with a musical beat. [1] This research also supports the idea that music has 'motivational' qualities that may enhance performance. One study measured the pace and attitudes of participants running on a treadmill. The control conditions included: 1) no music ('acoustic stimuli'), 2) ...


3

The following answer is based on my own experience learning music combined with general principles of cognitive psychology related to skill acquisition. I think that learning music would help a person recall a melody, a beat, and music in general. Formal training would be particularly helpful, but informal training would also often have a similar result. ...


3

For a general discussion of neural correlates of music perception, check out the review by Koelsch et al (2005). Menon et al (2002) provide a starting point for learning about neural correlates of timbre processing. I quote the abstract. But have a look at the article for more info Timbre is a major structuring force in music and one of the most ...


3

That's a difficult to say I assume many kind of past memories* linked with emotions subconsciously play certainly a critical role nevertheless I found an interesting link (http://www.gizmag.com/predicting-hit-songs/20939/) which is about a formula on how to find out the next hit song. *by memories I mean more kind of episodic memories rather than semantic ...


3

I found one 2017 meta-analysis by Sala and Gobet which is probably superior methodologically to the few non-systematic reviews found by AliceD. I say "probably" because the meta-analysis includes quite a few not-directly-IQ transfers, e.g. to math. Nevertheless, they do describe IQ transfers separately... and overall Cohen's d they found for that is ...


3

Oliver Sacks has an excellent and very approachable book on the topic (psychology/cognition + music in particular, less art in general): Musicophilia.


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