19

TLDR When two speakers become more similar in their speech this is called convergence or accomodation (opposite: divergence). This can occur on all levels of language, phonetics and phonology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. When mutual intellgibility is not an issue, accomodation mainly occurs when speakers like each other or want to appear likeable. ...


19

You may be thinking of the Backfire Effect. When presented with logical and rational evidence disputing a strongly-held belief, most people's natural tendency is to hold on even tighter to those beliefs rather than to reassess their position. As for why it happens... that's a matter of some debate (surprise, surprise), but the general thinking seems to be ...


14

The field that is doing this work you describe is sentiment analysis. From Wikipedia: A basic task in sentiment analysis is classifying the polarity of a given text at the document, sentence, or feature/aspect level — whether the expressed opinion in a document, a sentence or an entity feature/aspect is positive, negative, or neutral. Advanced, "beyond ...


13

I'm not an expert in this field, but this seemed interesting enough I did some reading up on the topic. The two review papers I found quickly were Prasse & Kikano (2008) and Lawrence & Barclay (1998), both from the Journal of the American Academy of Family Physicians. I have no idea whether this is a reputable journal or not. There appear to be ...


13

First question, how deep is your knowledge about autism and Asperger Syndrome? Do you understand how autistic people think? Do you understand, what this girl have meant, when she have written, she doesn't really understand what each means? For neurotypical person, a typical use-case for I understand you phrase is I know what you feel. But autistic people by ...


12

I don't think you need to resort to hormonal or neural explanations. Staring has social meaning. The meaning of staring varies across cultures and contexts. In some contexts it is normal (e.g., staring at a presenter, staring at the person you are talking to, staring at a sales assistant). In these contexts, staring has meaning such as indicating interest or ...


11

Narrative psychology is probably the go-to domain of research and theory for questions about the power and popularity of stories. Here's an excerpt from the Wikipedia page (with added emphasis): Narrative psychology is...concerned with the "storied nature of human conduct" [(Sarbin, 1986)] or...how human[s]...deal with experience by constructing stories ...


10

This question is studied within the fields of color psychology and enclothed cognition (e.g., Adam and Galinsky, 2012), currently a hot/controversial topic in cognitive science. Without addressing the substantial questions surrounding the premises of these interpretations for situated/embodied cognition in my answer, it seems that wearing black is associated ...


9

I'm no expert, but I can take a stab at it. What part of the brain is involved in this phenomenon The amygdala becomes active and locks up other parts of the brain (thank you @KeeganKeplinger for helping me clarify). This is based on the fact that the amygdala is responsible for more responses than fight or flight, as I had previously thought. Recently ...


7

I am experienced presenter, my job is to show presentation, organize educations and trainings to different people, with different personality traits in different situation. Until now I collected more the 700 hours of presentation and more then 120 hours of presentation education. In the beginning I had also that problem, but I overcome it by exercise. Now I ...


7

I would search under the topic of affective computing especially in detecting and recognizing emotional information and then specialize on NLP methods in this area. Here are a few articles of interest: Visualizing the affective structure of a text document A model of textual affect sensing using real-world knowledge Saurus: an emotionally-weighted ...


7

I'm not a cognitive science expert, but I happen to have some experience in change management / trying to convince people. There are in fact a lot of logical reasons for refusing logical and rational arguments. Suppose someone tries to share an idea with you. I will pass on the very obvious problems of "not befitting my interest" / "triggering culpability"....


7

Eye contact is one of the principal cues humans use to evaluate where other people direct their attention. A special issue on the use of eye tracking in the Infancy journal and other studies reported that infants' eyes are useful measures of attention over a range of task domains including object perception (Johnson, Slemmer, & Amso, 2004), faces (Hunnis ...


6

There is a scientific literature on typing. It's been a while since I've read the articles. You might start by reading this excellent review of research and findings on transcription typing. Salthouse, 1986: Perceptual, cognitive, and motoric aspects of transcription typing. PDF General model of typing Salthouse (1986) presents a model of the typing ...


6

I'd like to expand on volkerjaan's answer. I am Asperger myself. I know what :-), ;-) and ;-( mean (though I know ^^ only as see above). I don't necessarily understand when people are using them. I do understand their origins, and I suspect that is what the question boils down to. To explain what they mean: :-) — person feels happy :-( — person feels sad ;-...


6

Compulsive talking appears to be linked with the inability to manage social anxiety. Whether the anxiety is brought about from the uncomfortability of the interaction or from the avoidance of deep seated feelings within the individual. People who score beyond two standard deviations above the mean on the scale are labeled as “talkaholics,” as cited ...


5

Based on general principles of skill transfer: Reading a book aloud should improve your skills in reading books aloud, and in particular it should improve your skill in reading the particular passages that you are reading. So if you are going to be reading a particular text in a public setting, it makes sense to practice reading that passage of text. ...


5

I noticed that too. And it's not only the accent but the usage of words (different for lawyer and for a farmer), the sounds the person is making, movements and gestures. I think it has something to do with "calibration" of your communication with your "opponent". to get the best possible results when the brain thinks it's possible. Notice how you do the ...


5

I don't have a complete answer, but I'll add on to Christian's comment. I'm not really familiar with an evolutionary account of facial expressions, but folks like Adam K. Anderson have implied that the original use of facial features for sensory sampling have been co-opted for social use (e.g., to indicate attention, which Christian pointed out, or affect, ...


4

While there may be many social norms operating that discourage expression of hatred to your boss, typically there would be many rational reasons not to express such hatred: The employee's job could be terminated, which may result in lower income for the employee or a worse job in the future. Swearing in the workplace would often be considered harassment ...


4

Research into auditory processing deficits is a minefield and there is no real consensus as to what is and is not a deficit in auditory processing. Further, and possibly more relevant for individuals with, or dealing with, a processing disorder, is how to treat/manage the disorder. Again, unfortunately, there is no real consensus on the issue. Ferguson (2009)...


4

This is not a direct answer to the question, but a related construct that may be useful is alexithymia. Alexithymia is a personality construct describing relatively decreased ability to identify and express emotions. Psychometrically, the alexithymia construct has seen extensive use and undergone testing that by and large supported its validity (Bagby, ...


4

There are a few terms which can be used for this. The answer from @AlwaysConfused could describe the situation if you are actually talking to them like a child as stipulated in the title, but therapists should not sound patronising or condescending so I wonder if you may be referring to a form of "circumnavigation". The use of circumnavigation may not ...


3

Stuttering is a neuromuscular disorder. It consists of problems in sequencing and timing the movements required for the speech. The whisper is speech without vibration of the vocal cords. Since there is no vocal fold vibration, the muscles that control pitch are not active and the larynx does not need to move. This means when the PWS ( person who stutters) ...


3

The first thing that comes to mind when reading this is diffusion of responsibility. Because responsibility has not been explicitly assigned, as it would be in a one-on-one meeting, people tend to feel like they do not need to do anything.


3

I have studied computational neuroscience, first as an undergraduate at the University of Chicago, and then as a graduate student at UCSD and the Salk Institute. As an answer to your question, to my knowledge, and after a quick search on google scholar, there are no studies that try to reroute auditory information to the visual cortex through the vocal ...


3

Crossing arms may not necessarily mean detachment or rejection. However, more often than not, that's the usual implication. It can mean different things for different people and, furthermore, in different situations. Some people cross arms to make themselves secure, perhaps when they are intellectually or physically overshadowed. Or maybe when they are ...


3

Some generalizations: Because Enlightenment-era rationality, with its values of liberalism and rationality and progress, has a very bad (read: hypocritical) historical track record of irrational, inegalitarian, maximally exploitative colonialism. Phrenology and Orientalism are among its crown jewels. The first chapter of Immanuel Wallerstein's World-Systems ...


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