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Ethics of Feedback: The APA's code of ethics (2010) as well as the Advisory Group on Conducting Research on the Internet (AGCRI) report (2004) summarize ethical issues related to conducting offline and online psychological research. Feedback is normal in psychological experiments, and researchers are encouraged to debrief participants, before, immediately ...


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For applied purposes, gamification can be captured within a self-determination theoretical framework. Self-Determination Theory (SDT) is an influential theory of motivation which grew out of research on intrinsic/extrinsic rewards in the 1970's, and which has been applied to virtually every learning setting. The main proponents of SDT include Edward Deci and ...


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The short answer is that anyone who gives you a short answer should be treated with suspicion. ;-p The StackExchange was founded in 2008, and has seen a lot of changes since that time. That has provided the science community with little time to study the phenomenon in much detail. As such, there are many many theories, but little consensus, and no ...


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I would also add this paper, which includes a critical discussion of the concept and proposes a working-definition for gamification in educational settings: R. Rughinis, 2013, Gamification for productive interaction: Reading and working with the gamification debate in education https://www.academia.edu/5758624/Gamification_for_Productive_Interaction....


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Malone and Lepper (1987) is often cited as the seminal paper regarding gamification for education. They started off by identifying factors which affect computer game preferences and then identified motivational factors. Habgood et al (2005) built on this taxonomy and developed a high quality game for supporting the teaching of division. My understanding is ...


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This is actually a perfect fit for the best kind of gamification that illuminates the progress you're already making (but weren't aware of) 1. Break the creative task into steps in a creative process 2. Measure that progress for the user. You don't even need to reward progress, just how them how it gets them closer to the goal. Success may not be guaranteed,...


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TL;DR When a boring, repetitive task is being gamed for rewards, there are two things that you need to look at. First, the problem definition and whether it is accurately defined (keeping in mind that autonomy is not lost). Second, the conditions of the reward and what is the actual behavior that is being rewarded. There are two main factors influencing how ...


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Hmm. It's possibly I'm misunderstanding, in which case I will happily retract my answer. But does gamification really apply to, well, games? I thought the idea behind gamification was to take user engagement elements present in games and add them into non-gaming situations to increase user retention/satisfaction etc. So I would say that if you're making a ...


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For something to be considered a mental disorder worthy of it's own definition, it needs to have some really strong effects that are consistently different from others definitions and are not explained by co-morbidity of others. ADHD, OCD, and Tourettes all exhibit co-morbidity and common brain regions, but since the symptoms and treatment differ so ...


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I would argue that gamification is essentially a form of applied motivational psychology. As such, all findings from research on motivation could potentially be important for gamification. In the other thread that you mention, Self-Determination Theory (Gagne & Deci, 2005) has already been brought up. I would like to make a couple of very general ...


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The game League of Legends utilised an Elo Rating System which incorporated within it a decay system. The decay worked on a user score and reduced it dependent on both user performance and time. Here, user score was an indicator of skill level and was used in another formula to calibrate the actual scores they received from other in-game activities. So, ...


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Chess is considered "special" due to certain attributes of the game. From "Beyond the 64 Squares: Does Chess Instruction Enhance Children’s Academic and Cognitive Skills? A Meta-Analysis": Two main explanations have been adduced to support this hypothesis. First, chess requires decision-making skills and high-level processes (such as acquiring and ...


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Short answer The Stack Exchange model is based on gamification. Gamified environments typically deploy incremental rewards that tap into the brain's reward system, making these applications addictive, in a quite literal sense. In addition, reputation increases come with incremental gain of moderator abilities, which give a sense of power. Background I ...


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In this question are mixed different topics that are not very well categorized, to find documents or specific tests is better to adapt certain topics, is not usually talk of cooperative versus competitive activities, but individual versus group activities. In research on the judgment or solution of group problems, the hypothesis is implicit that the ...


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There are a lot of courses and literature about gamification in learning by Karl Kapp. http://karlkapp.com/articles/. Most of them are not scientific articles, but there are also books, courses and insturctions how to integrate these ideas. The topics you are asking for are partly discussed there.


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I disagree with the premise the question. Some of the most popular casual games in the world use the classic points systems that have been used since the 90s. Angry Birds, Plants vs Zombies, Bejeweled, Subway Surfer are played by millions of players worldwide and they all use a classical points system. Also, many users regularly share their scores on social ...


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Intrinsic Rewards (motivation) These are rewards which are directly of value to the person, rather being something that represents (or could be "traded in") for something to of value. So getting a badge in and of itself isn't an Intrinsic Reward, but up votes on an answer would be b/c it converts Status and Validation of the user's work. These rewards are ...


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For starters, I think it's a good idea to provide rewards for both students and mentors. As an example: Mentors could receive rewards for answering questions by students, while students receive rewards for solving exercises. Furthermore, the mentor should be able to give rewards for good questions etc. Actually, it's quite a bit like Stack Exchange, if you ...


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The game mechanics playdeck from tech startup SCVNGR gives 50 great starting points. Perhaps more directly relevant to the SE CogSci audience is the Mental Notes project, which aims to "bring a little psychology to Web design [...] each card describes one insight into human behavior and suggests ways to apply this to the design of Web sites, Web apps, and ...


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I think it depends. If the game is good, the player will be motivated to learn what they need to succeed in the game. The long term effects may vary depending on different attributes, which I divided into two groups. This is of course not an exhaustive list. Providing learning tools Did the game generalize enough, so that the player feels like the more ...


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