Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
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Short version: A question is possible to answer sociologically if and only if its scale and region (informally speaking, its context) are completely defined and its variables of interest are operationalized. Long (really long) version: The following answer may be colored by my quantitative background, but if you give me the benefit of the doubt here and ...


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There is serious work on this, despite it being a political minefield. You're probably looking for Lewandowsky, et al. (2015). If you want to get some distance from the issues of the day (and associated name calling) and into the mechanisms that drive this sort of phenomenon in general you might get more joy out of something like Cook & Lewandowsky (...


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I don't think the idea of a male/female brain is well established in the neurosciences. If you read a book like Delusions of Gender you'll get a critical perspective on the status of sex differences in the brain. At some level, sex differences in behaviour must be mediated through the brain. But there are major debates about the degree to which such ...


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The literature you are looking for is regarding group polarisation in the Internet era (with "polarisation" being the main research keyword here). There are supporters of your idea as well, most notably Eli Pariser (2011) and Cass Sunstein (2001, 2009, 2017) and studies that show polarisation on the Internet. That being said: However, when comparisons ...


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Existing Papers I found three papers in the same vein with considerably more empirical evidence. 1. Modeling the Size of Wars In the paper, provinces and conflicts are modeled to justify Richardson's observation that the proportion of conflict severity in relation to their frequency is described by a power law. In other words, the more space there is ...


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Short answer: This question does not have a sociological or other scientific answer because it cannot be studied empirically as currently conceived, but it is a valid question all the same. It may still be possible for a humanistic field of study, such as History, to provide a satisfying answer. Long answer: There is currently no way to define what or how ...


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You may look for an answer in some anthropological works about hunter-gatherers, e.g. Christopher Boehm's Hierachy in the Forest. Basically, he describes what he calls a "reverse dominance pyramid", which can be observed in many hunter-gatherer tribes. Individuals who are aggressive, bossy, try to behave like alpha-males are mocked, then warned, shunned, and ...


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After some significant searching myself I don't believe that what you've stated was one of the many criticisms of "The Bell Curve". It wouldn't be impossible for the review you read to go something like, "Murray's, "The Bell Curve" is akin to other racially biased research like as XYZ's "IQ Research", in which XYZ claimed that African students had, on ...


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Nicky Case is a tough act to follow, but there are a lot of simulations available for a variety of different theories in social psychology and behavioural economics. As such, I won't try to list them all, but provide a "list of lists" that should help you to find more. Wikipedia maintains a list of games in game theory. This does not link to any ...


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From Personal Experience, teachers will demand more from their child if their child is in that class for a couple of reasons: To show the rest of the class that there is no favoritism towards the child, as well as to ensure that the child performs exceptionally in the class. Whether they achieve better/worse results is dependent on the level that this "...


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Even though @RobinKramer did some work to remove some opinion from the question, there are still some opinions in the question which to me cannot be backed up with hard facts. However, the question has enough in it to answer your question. Apart from @AliceD's excellent answer in the possible duplicate question indicated by @RobinKramer, there is a theory ...


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This question can be unswered from the field of sociology. Sociology is the study of social behaviour or society, including its origins, development, organisation, networks, and institutions. It is a social science that uses various methods of empirical investigation and critical analysis to develop a body of knowledge about social order, disorder,...


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I've been fascinated by this question for years, but unfortunately don't have a conclusive answer. So instead, I'll make an ad-hoc list of the things I've found/explored about this topic and hopefully this will give you a starting point until someone else can create a better answer with better references. My current approach to this is MindMaps, which is ...


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This effect was identified in a report by the New Zealand Ministry of Social Development (Jensen et al., 2006). It specifically indicated that individuals experiencing eight or more "life shocks" (negative life events) experienced significantly more negative socioeconomic outcomes. This effect is referenced on Wikipedia's Cycle of Poverty page (http://en....


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The paper "Can robots make good models of biological behaviour" by Barbara Webb comes from a slightly different area, i.e. modeling biological organisms with robotics, making artificial cockroaches for example. It has a brilliant theoretical examination of modeling in terms of epistemology and philosophy of science. For your question it is possible that ...


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As highlighted in the comments, not all observations necessarily need a term in psychology, but there is a term for this. Therapy plans will often involve getting the client to try to look at their situation (past or present) in a different context. Some people would call this "wearing other peoples shoes", or in other words they might say "if I were in ...


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Although you are correct in thinking, mental health is not defined merely by what others feel, it is a lot more personal. If I am understanding your question correctly, you believe that mental health is based on predictions. While predictions are necessary for defining a lesser known disorder, ones such as major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder are ...


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If we take "social class" to mean income/wealth as it's most commonly the case in the West today, then there's even an academic term for the uncommon friendships across such classes, namely "income-bridging". As for their occurence, let me quote you from a paper by Léna Pellandini-Simányi (which happens to survey Hungarian society, but I think it easily ...


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