21

This is a part-answer to your question and it doesn't come from occupational psychology, but from expertise research. Findings from Expertise Research In their seminal paper on the role of deliberate practice for the acquisition of expert performance, Ericsson et al. (1993) report a number of constraints that play a role in the acquisition of expert ...


19

In short, no. Perry's essay is amusing and compelling, but incomplete. Procrastination is an epiphenomenon of motivation, an active area of research which has some models relevant to the study of procrastination, such as: Hyperbolic Discounting Temporal Motivation Theory Rational Choice Theory Expectancy Theory Perry emphasizes task importance as the ...


11

If you take a look at games like minecraft, they have quite a lot of players who do not work (students, college students, etc). These people first mine thousands of blocks, then rearrange them in a creative way. There's absolutely no need to do so, it is entirely voluntary, yet people end up moving hundreds of thousands of blocks to do something creative or ...


10

I don't know of a study that tries to answer your specific question but you might want to have a look at illusory superiority, "a cognitive bias that causes people to overestimate their positive qualities and abilities and to underestimate their negative qualities, relative to others" (wikipedia). I can especially recommend the paper by Dunning and Kruger (...


9

Do personality tests predict job performance in general? There is a large academic literature correlating personality test scores with job performance. You might want to check out the meta-analysis by Barrick et al (2001). It reports the meta-analytic correlations often based on hundreds of studies between Big 5 personality test scores and job performance. ...


8

[This started as a comment but became really long, hence an answer.] The hostility is real but the premise that more than a small minority of people forgo “working” by laziness is in fact very questionable, in several ways. People might dream of winning the lottery but there is very little evidence that they generally avoid “work”. In fact, with the same ...


7

i think death is what motivates people to work: working is doing something and trying to be remembered, much like Picasso, Einstein... Every human would want to do something in his life, something to be remembered for, everyone wants to make a change, make a difference, the ultimate dream of every human being able is to change the world. And that's why they ...


7

This is an extremely interesting question. I'm going to take a different approach to the question by focusing on both personality traits and leadership theories (e.g. authentic leadership, transformational leadership, servant leadership etc) to answer whether those two distinct areas can influence leaders' children's development. I will admit that I didn't ...


6

An alert of a follow up paper ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF JOB PERFORMANCE: THE ROLE OF MEASUREMENT CHARACTERISTICS IN OBSERVED DEPARTURES FROM NORMALITY and subsequent search brought me to this discussion. I don't have full access to these articles unfortunately. Of the two questions that posed, no, I wouldn't expect to find a normal distribution and no, I ...


6

For applied purposes, gamification can be captured within a self-determination theoretical framework. Self-Determination Theory (SDT) is an influential theory of motivation which grew out of research on intrinsic/extrinsic rewards in the 1970's, and which has been applied to virtually every learning setting. The main proponents of SDT include Edward Deci and ...


6

Relationship between study time and performance Plant et al (2004) review the literature of studies that have correlated average time spent studying and variables such as GPA. They report a couple of correlational studies in the literature that found small positive correlations (e.g., $r=.18, r=.23$). They make two main points: (a) academic performance is ...


6

There is a large general literature evaluating the degree to which personality tests predict job performance. In particular see for example the review by Barrick et al (2001). In general such reviews find that personality measures provide a small but meaningful prediction of job performance. Ipsative testing So in general, you are asking about how ...


6

There are a bunch of them! For a great review of many definitions and measures of meaningfulness, see if you can get a copy of A Narrative Evidence Synthesis of Meaningful Work: Progress and Research Agenda. The authors are pretty responsive in my experience and will send you a copy. One thing to keep in mind, though, is that there are a bunch of different ...


5

Quantitative papers There are a number of papers that didn't use a Bayesian approach but provide a relevant basis for developing quantitative Bayesian models: Zickar et al (2004) performed a mixed-model using item response theory to examine different classes of respondents to personality tests. While it doesn't appear to be a Bayesian analysis, it is an ...


4

Fortin and Masse (2000) explored the effect of expecting an interruption on the ability to accurately produce a timing interval (e.g., producing a 2000 millisecond timing interval): From the abstract: The interference from nontemporal processing on concurrent time estimation is usually attributed to disruption in timing caused by artentional ...


4

This is a big and important topic. The following is a bit of an introduction. Feel free to ask a separate more focussed question. Some terminology In general distinctions are made between the terms bias, fairness, and discrimination. Bias is a statistical term. Bias for a group can indicate that test scores for that group are systematically lower or ...


4

While there may be many social norms operating that discourage expression of hatred to your boss, typically there would be many rational reasons not to express such hatred: The employee's job could be terminated, which may result in lower income for the employee or a worse job in the future. Swearing in the workplace would often be considered harassment ...


4

Let me say first off that I don't know anything about cognitive style. However, I have recently read an interesting article by van Knippenberg and van Ginkel (2010) about diversity in work teams which might be relevant here. Demographic Diversity. To explain the sometimes contradicting effects of diversity on work teams, the authors propose a model that ...


4

This is the paper you would want to read on this topic. The paper empirically compares four modes of managing interruptions. It is a great (and long) read so I'll try to summarize the bit for you: There are thus four modes of managing interruptions: Immediate interruptions. There is no management whatsoever. As soon there is a distracting stimulus/task, it ...


4

Although it is not exactly stress, there are many self-rating scales for workload. The most popular one is the NASA-Task Load Index (NASA-TLX; Hart & Staveland, 1988; see also here). The NASA-TLX consists of six dimensions, which a.o. describe temporal demands, mental effort and frustration. Although there is some weighting procedure accompanied with it, ...


4

A few points: Cut-offs are somewhat arbitrary. Engagement is typically measured using a mulit-item scale. It will generate a scaled response. E.g., there might be 10 items each measured on a 1 to 5 scale. Presumably, Gallup adopts an approach of carving up that scale into categories of engagement. I think they use 12 items from the Gallup Q12; they might be ...


3

Doing creative and unique(new) things will motivate you. But only if there is another person or living/virtual "creature" that can appreciate that or you can tell/show it to that "creature". I don't consider taking drugs or other stimulants/inhibitors to make you do something, because it's a distorted will or changed behavior and not your own will. Human ...


3

Personality is generally theorised to be a stable individual difference variable. Research has shown it to be highly stable over time. Thus, from a theoretical perspective it typically has a primacy in causal models. Stress can be an ambiguous construct. It can refer to the objective existence of stressful stimuli or the way that individuals perceive ...


3

I would argue that gamification is essentially a form of applied motivational psychology. As such, all findings from research on motivation could potentially be important for gamification. In the other thread that you mention, Self-Determination Theory (Gagne & Deci, 2005) has already been brought up. I would like to make a couple of very general ...


3

The distinction between maximum and typical performance was originally established by Sackett et al. (1988), and since then, how to predict either and their relation to one another seems to have been a very active area of research. In fact, there is a prohibitively large literature on the matter for a full review. Fortunately, your questions were recently ...


3

You may be interested in the research on "thin slices" of behavior, defined as a very short video clip of behavior, often without audio. Abstract from Ambady & Rosenthal (1992): A meta-analysis was conducted on the accuracy of predictions of various objective outcomes in the areas of clinical and social psychology from short observations of ...


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