7

This is an extremely interesting question. I'm going to take a different approach to the question by focusing on both personality traits and leadership theories (e.g. authentic leadership, transformational leadership, servant leadership etc) to answer whether those two distinct areas can influence leaders' children's development. I will admit that I didn't ...


6

There is a large general literature evaluating the degree to which personality tests predict job performance. In particular see for example the review by Barrick et al (2001). In general such reviews find that personality measures provide a small but meaningful prediction of job performance. Ipsative testing So in general, you are asking about how ...


6

There are a bunch of them! For a great review of many definitions and measures of meaningfulness, see if you can get a copy of A Narrative Evidence Synthesis of Meaningful Work: Progress and Research Agenda. The authors are pretty responsive in my experience and will send you a copy. One thing to keep in mind, though, is that there are a bunch of different ...


4

Let me say first off that I don't know anything about cognitive style. However, I have recently read an interesting article by van Knippenberg and van Ginkel (2010) about diversity in work teams which might be relevant here. Demographic Diversity. To explain the sometimes contradicting effects of diversity on work teams, the authors propose a model that ...


4

Although it is not exactly stress, there are many self-rating scales for workload. The most popular one is the NASA-Task Load Index (NASA-TLX; Hart & Staveland, 1988; see also here). The NASA-TLX consists of six dimensions, which a.o. describe temporal demands, mental effort and frustration. Although there is some weighting procedure accompanied with it, ...


4

This is the paper you would want to read on this topic. The paper empirically compares four modes of managing interruptions. It is a great (and long) read so I'll try to summarize the bit for you: There are thus four modes of managing interruptions: Immediate interruptions. There is no management whatsoever. As soon there is a distracting stimulus/task, it ...


4

A few points: Cut-offs are somewhat arbitrary. Engagement is typically measured using a mulit-item scale. It will generate a scaled response. E.g., there might be 10 items each measured on a 1 to 5 scale. Presumably, Gallup adopts an approach of carving up that scale into categories of engagement. I think they use 12 items from the Gallup Q12; they might be ...


3

Theoretical integration is unknown to me, and i suspect that many I/Os have not yet heard of scrum and agile. These are relatively new even in their native industry(software). If i had to write my comprehensive exam paper on it, I'd pitch you two models. First, an oldie but a goldie, the Job Characteristics model (Hackman and Oldham). This model has ...


3

Much of the scientific literature in psychology is concerned with proposing and empirically testing theories. However, if you are a practitioner you are interested in how you can apply these ideas to achieve applied goals. This requires that you understand the support for various scientific ideas and that you are able to apply them to a specific situation. ...


3

Assuming the specific case of being "motivated towards a career" rather then simply getting a job to make ends meet, there can be several factors. Social status is probably the most common pursuit of a career. Enjoyment, which is the ideal reason for pursuing a career. Usually a career sought for enjoyment is referred to as 'pursuing one's dream'. ...


3

The game League of Legends utilised an Elo Rating System which incorporated within it a decay system. The decay worked on a user score and reduced it dependent on both user performance and time. Here, user score was an indicator of skill level and was used in another formula to calibrate the actual scores they received from other in-game activities. So, ...


3

I'm not aware of any such initiatives. But it would be great to see. In general, I think I/O psychology has been a bit less proactive in engaging with the open science approach than some disciplines of psychology. More generally, many researchers are silent on the issue of licences for their scales. Thus, it can be ambiguous about what you are allowed to do ...


3

Yes. One example is that people high in Openness to New Experiences are interested in aesthetic experiences including museums and being in nature, and novel experiences as you'd expect from the name. https://psycnet.apa.org/record/1997-08808-031 Treatment is a bit misleading here to mean 'study', because in psychology it usually means 'intervention'.


2

I don't know any actual "faking bad" studies or theories involving the Big Five, but there are some theories about the Big Five's general factor that can both explain the common finding you mention and inform a hypothesis about potential results from a study that would address your questions. I don't expect this will be a very satisfying answer, because I'm ...


2

You could compare with other kinds of communication limitations, or bottlenecks if you wish. For example, one could have problems keeping up with his thoughts while speaking. This would causes some lacks of information and create a gap in the representations of the subject between the two interlocutors. I think it's like the "lost idea" phenomenon, too ...


2

I am unfamiliar with such research. However, considering this from a User Interface design perspective, as well as from a cognitive perspective, I would add one bit of clarification to the question. Can we enter data at the speed of organized thought? If the limitations in user interface technology are overcome to the point where the input gate is no ...


2

The basic idea is that you get a sample population. Let's say you have 100 people. You give each of those a creativity rating through some process. Afterwards you give every person in the sample population a stack of questions. You run statistical tests to determine which of those questions correlate with someone being creative. You keep all the questions ...


2

Building on @caseyr547's answer, and especially the second link in the first reply to your comment, yes! From Cook's (2009) abstract (emphasis added): Over the past decade, there have been numerous claims in the popular media relating to having fun at work, touting a plethora of benefits for both individuals and organisations that have to date not been ...


2

Short answer Endsley considers SA to be a product. Smith and Hancock argue that SA is a process. Deciding for a definition is important, since it can determine the focus of the research and methodology. Long answer The Three-level model proposed by Endsley considers SA to be a product. In other words, SA is a mental picture that can be tested by testing ...


2

I'm posting a summary here (thanks to @DJ Sims for directing me to the paper of interest). Kepes and McDaniel (2015) re-analysed data from an existing meta-analysis. The existing meta-analysis had been examining various moderators of the relationship between big 5 personality and job performance. Kepes and McDaniel performed a range of sensitivity analyses. ...


2

For a high-level overview, I usually start with Wikipedia. Wikipedia is a peer-reviewed, community-contributed, comprehensive source of high-level information. The user community has already done the work for us of aggregating large volumes of primary and secondary source material, digesting it for the reader, keeping it up to date, and ensuring a balanced ...


2

I suppose much depends on what one means by "building character"; if it's increasing self-esteem, then the answer is probably no, as you've already pointed out. But I don't think that's what most people mean by building character. So what is it? Certainly you'll learn something from having a demeaning job, because you'll learn something from just about ...


2

Personality testing of (potential) employees is big business, according to the BBC: A 2014 survey of global HR professionals by CEB, one of the largest providers of online talent tests, indicated that 62% of respondents used some sort of personality test pre-hire. Thirty percent indicated that personality assessments would be used to identify high ...


1

It sounds like you are talking about a range of concepts. You could look into measures related to: Organisational citizenship behaviour: This tends to look at good discretionary behaviors such as collaboration, helping out colleagues, and so on. Engagement and affective commitment: Both these constructs are closely related to motivation and alignment with ...


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