12

The first Google hit for "creativity training psychology" (Chamorro-Premuzic, 2013) seems to answer your question pretty thoroughly. Prof. Chamorro-Premuzic is a pretty formidable psychologist, so it's no surprise coming from him! To quote the post: In short, creativity is not 100% malleable, but it can be affected by deliberate interventions. People's ...


10

I'm afraid I have to disagree with Mozibur Ullah's answer. Instead of talking about Plato, Socrates and Picasso I'll mention one, incredibly creative and intelligent person: John Cleese. Telling people how to be creative is easy, it's only being it what's difficult. Creativity is not a talent. It is a way of operating. Creativity is not an ability you ...


8

I'd recommend checking out Wikipedia's article on autodidacticism for a start. This might give you a better sense of the context surrounding the word, and whether it really means so much as you feel it does. My first impression is that this is not much more than a semantic issue (but I have a second impression, which I'll get to next). The literal definition ...


7

Is there a name for the phenomena of not putting effort into study because of fear of failure which in turn results in actual failure? Yes, this is called self-handicapping. Self-handicapping is the process by which people avoid effort in the hopes of keeping potential failure from hurting self-esteem. What causes this? The main and most ...


6

No, social psychology is not a subfield of educational psychology. Social psychology is one of the basic disciplines of psychology (like e.g. personality psychology or developmental psychology), whereas educational psychology is an applied discipline (like e.g. clinical psychology or industrial/organizational psychology). A sort of standard definition of ...


6

Short answer The recent literature shows mounting evidence for beneficial effects of music on cognitive abilities. The big 'but' in the issue is how specific those effects are and whether they will hold up in longitudinal studies. Background Great question. Your citations provided reach back to 2006 so I thought to limit this answer using recent articles ...


5

Consider this, communication is more than 50% nonverbal. Studies vary (from 93% nonverbal to 75%) and the actual percentage is difficult to interpret, but it is generally accepted that most of the communication is nonverbal. That being said, a book is only written word and content, whereas a lecture is dynamic, versatile, and incorporates much of the ...


5

Our university has a public grade distribution database, so I did a really quick analysis on some historical data to see if there was any support for this idea. To my surprise, it appears that there might be. But, my analysis is very limited. I downloaded the grade distributions for all intro psychology and intro computer science classes from 2010-2014. ...


5

One of the publications on engaged learning that you provide (the "Engaged Learning: Are We All on the Same Page?" one) seems to answer your question (here is a fuller version of it). The quote that addresses your question is given below (bold added). Many of these concepts of engagement cover ground similar to that covered by initiatives in ...


5

Your question is extremely broad so all I can do is give you an extremely broad answer. More specifically, I'll provide you a study done by John Hattie (2008), who meta-analyzed 800(!!) meta-analyses on effective teaching methods, used in primary education among others. The linked document shows a "brief" overview of the different methods rated and sorted ...


4

I would also add this paper, which includes a critical discussion of the concept and proposes a working-definition for gamification in educational settings: R. Rughinis, 2013, Gamification for productive interaction: Reading and working with the gamification debate in education https://www.academia.edu/5758624/Gamification_for_Productive_Interaction....


4

Malone and Lepper (1987) is often cited as the seminal paper regarding gamification for education. They started off by identifying factors which affect computer game preferences and then identified motivational factors. Habgood et al (2005) built on this taxonomy and developed a high quality game for supporting the teaching of division. My understanding is ...


4

If you don't have a decent amount of education in psychology already, I wouldn't recommend diving straight into journals...but I wouldn't recommend you don't either. If you want to check them out, I'd say the only harm is the cost and the chance of getting discouraged, so first of all, I'd recommend this: don't get discouraged! You're on the right track. The ...


4

Low latent inhibition is not an ideal state...Wikipedia lists several potential problems including attentional and emotional dysregulation, psychosis, and negative emotionality. Wikipedia also suggests that intelligence may moderate effects on well-being, such that more highly intelligent people could cope with stronger stimulation more effectively, and ...


4

This is a really neat question. A strong predictor of cognitive ability is one's environmental enrichment, or the stimulation of the brain in its physical and social surroundings. Those with sensory deprivation often have less success with social situations and self-esteem, as well as (presumably) less sensory input coming in. The implication is that lack ...


3

In my country, studying educational psychology is a postgraduate qualification. It implies that you have completed an undergraduate sequence in psychology, and therefore would have already been exposed to the basics of statistics and research methods (e.g., univariate, bivariate statistics, significance testing, various ANOVA, regression, study designs, ...


3

Cross Validated has a long list of answers to, "What book would you recommend for non-statistician scientists?" including an answer from our own @JeromyAnglim regarding SPSS for psychologists. Jeromy has also listed a number of good recommendations in response to The current recommended text for statistics in behavioural sciences, and @Mike suggested one for ...


3

One might argue that the skill of critical thinking is the sum of the goal of higher education. I certainly take that view. On the other hand- we don't really have a good definition of exactly what comprises critical thinking. Without a concise definition, it is difficult to answer the question (see the last paragraph below). From a purely anecdotal ...


3

Let me begin by saying that the answer is nowhere near as simple as you or I would like it to be. There are several reasons for this, but the main reason is that there are myriad ways that students can struggle through the material. I became interested in this subject when I was a graduate teaching assistant in the Industrial Engineering program at Iowa ...


3

I have to agree with @NickStauner - it sounds like you (as most people do; television is a culprit here) have a relatively rose-tinted view of people with a lower latent inhibition. This is not an answer, this is an anecdote. First off, a person's 'level of latent inhibition' will fluctuate. I have low latent inhibition (if you read this - yep, that's a ...


3

According to the distributed learning strategy which is based on a phenomenon called spacing effect, it is better to study classes in parallel. Distributed practice (also known as spaced repetition or spaced practice) is a learning strategy, where practice is broken up into a number of short sessions – over a longer period of time. Humans and ...


3

I found one 2017 meta-analysis by Sala and Gobet which is probably superior methodologically to the few non-systematic reviews found by AliceD. I say "probably" because the meta-analysis includes quite a few not-directly-IQ transfers, e.g. to math. Nevertheless, they do describe IQ transfers separately... and overall Cohen's d they found for that is ...


3

Mathematics is the abstract science of number, quantity, and space, either as abstract concepts (pure mathematics), or as applied to other disciplines such as physics and engineering (applied mathematics) Cognitive sciences are the interdisciplinary, scientific studies of the mind and its processes I think that mathematics is a way to achieve ...


3

Well, your ears are shaped in a way that is optimized for sound sources in front of you, so it could be that. But my non-expert bet is that probably they're using gaze to signal that they're paying attention. The signal is not just to you "I'm following what you're saying" but to everyone else as well, "hey, check out what's going on over there" creating ...


2

There are a lot of courses and literature about gamification in learning by Karl Kapp. http://karlkapp.com/articles/. Most of them are not scientific articles, but there are also books, courses and insturctions how to integrate these ideas. The topics you are asking for are partly discussed there.


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