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8

As Josh Gitlin said, imagining something activates more or less the same parts of the brain as actually experiencing it. Behrmann (2000) is a good introduction to this in the visual domain, though that article is a bit outdated now. There is also a lot of evidence that representations of meanings (semantic memory) involve a distributed network of perceptual ...


7

Yes. See contra-freeloading or (for humans) ikea effect. Contrafreeloading: (verb) The behavior in which animals offered the choice between eating food provided to them for free or working to get that food would eat the most food from the source that required effort. This term was created in 1963 by animal psychologist Glen Jensen. Jensen ran a study on ...


6

There is some scientific evidence that it does. And a physiological explanation as well. During fasting, there are several things happening in the body, among other things hypoglycemia (low glucose level in the blood). All those changes that occur actually stress the brain. That stress has been shown to be compensated by the brain by creating brain-derived ...


4

Rozin (1996) provides an introduction to the psychology of food. Rozin and Schiller (1980) present a study on the acquisition of preferences for chili peppers. In the abstract, they write: Interviews, observations, and measurements were carried out in both Mexico and the United States. Exposure to gradually increasing levels of chili in food seems ...


4

You've received a few great comments from our neuroscience-savvy users that indicate ways in which this question can be construed as particularly challenging or maybe even unanswerable. However, I think there's a much more basic and limited understanding of your question that takes into account your self-professed unfamiliarity with neuropharmacology and ...


3

One explanation for the development of 'acquired tastes' is a form of reinforcement learning called flavor-flavor learning. The name sounds a bit odd on its own, but should best be seen in relation to the concept of flavor-nutrient learning. What flavor-flavor learning is When a previously unexperienced flavor is encountered with familiar flavors, the ...


3

Short answer According to a study dating 6 years back, the incidence rate of anorexia nervosa was stable over several decades. Background According to a review paper published in 2012, the overall incidence rate of eating disorders, including anorexia, was stable over the previous decades. However, there was an increase found in the high risk-group of 15–...


2

Paul McKenna would be jumping on this question had it been a self-help question :) Some of the causes/factors in habitual eating and strategies to combat habitual eating are described below. Causes and factors of habitual eating Excessive hunger may precipitate an episode of binge eating compared to average hunger levels (Haedt-Matt & Keel, 2011). ...


2

Short answer is YES, at least for rats, who do have chemosensors in their brain and alter their liking of salty foods and foods containing certain amino acids. See this question and question on Biology.SE: Do humans have chemosensors for nutrients or chemicals? Do omnivore mammals vary food preferences based on dietary needs?


2

Probably not. The closest thing I am aware of is Mayor et al (2016) [The Effect of Chronic Dieting Goals on Auditory Perceptual Biases] where they propose the existence of “wishful hearing,” which establishes that ambient product sounds can be perceived as more spatially proximal when more desirable and thus lead to increased purchase intentions and ...


2

From my reading, I believe that anorexics can see others in the same way as us or they can also see other anorexics as normal. It seems that anorexics don't necessarily hallucinate rolls of fat or other shape differences between healthy and overweight or obese people. Thomas et al. (2012) describes the case of ‘Ms A’, who described herself as having ‘3% of ...


1

Droid here are a couple of relevant studies: Experiments with rodents done by Kent Berridge found that: Stressed rats will expend more energy on obtaining pleasurable relief (in the form of food) than non-stressed rats. But only to familiar foods Peciña, S., Schulkin, J., & Berridge, K.C. (2006). Nucleus accumbens corticotropin-releasing factor ...


1

Glutamate availability in the brain is strictly dependent on de novo synthesis of glutamine in astrocytes. This process requires the enzymes pyruvate carboxylase and glutamine synthetase to form glutamine, which is then converted into glutamate by deamidation via phosphate-activated glutaminase in a reaction that also yields ammonia (Schousboe et al., 2014)....


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