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[Edit]: Parts of this answer respond to removed content in older versions of the OP, and to comments. The current version of the OP deserves some elaboration of this answer. (And, IMHO, other answers too!) There are other spiritual "worlds" than those that are dualistic. By common psychological definitions of spirituality, the existence of an "...


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Your question specifically asks environmental factors which predict theism/atheism. Although your question is quite simple, it actually raises quite a few complexities. Firstly, are we referring to religiosity, or specifically a belief in god? Many studies examining the psychology of the religion fail to make this distinction clear. Most probably because ...


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Maybe what you are looking for is the field cognitive science of religion: Cognitive science of religion is the study of religious thought and behavior from the perspective of the cognitive and evolutionary sciences. The field employs methods and theories from a very broad range of disciplines, including: cognitive psychology, evolutionary psychology, ...


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The exhibited behaviours are episodic glossolalia, collapsing, fainting, trembling, jerking, convulsing, contorting and shaking. The individuals performing these episodic behaviours report experiencing overwhelming emotions of love, peace, ecstasy and euphoria. The exhibited behaviours are inconsistent with the claimed emotions, so perhaps another way to ...


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As the OP notes, this has been a difficult topic for Skeptics.SE. I'm going to try to answer here, but over on Skeptics this would probably be labelled as "Original Research". The problem for Skeptics.SE is that the claim being challenged is that these shaking movements have a supernatural cause. All we can say for certain is that we can't rule out ...


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This is an interesting question, so I'll take a stab at it. Direct evidence for the claim is hard to come by. Generally, religious affiliations, conversions, and loss of faith are self-identified in surveys. The reliance on self-identification makes it difficult to test the claim that people move to some other non-evidence-based reasoning, as they may not ...


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A good, and very pertinent question. This speculative and blunt answer is based on the literature that I have studied as part of understanding behavior change. It is a simplification of the literature, but it should set a foundation that you could build on if you wanted to investigate further and develop a more nuanced view. Is religious affiliation ...


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A study reported, in the 80's, that unmarried cohabitation prior to marriage was associated with "significantly" lower marital satisfaction, but did not report an effect size. They also reported that the duration of unmarried cohabitation was unrelated to marital satisfaction(DeMaris and Leslie, 1984). A later study by the same lead author from the ...


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An inherent problem with the line of investigation is that the exhibited behaviours are inconsistent with the claimed emotions. In no other situation do the emotions of love, peace, ecstasy and euphoria result in the performance of behaviours such as glossolalia, collapsing, fainting, trembling, jerking, convulsing, contorting and shaking. More likely ...


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I think, from a statistical point of view, this question will be impossible to answer, because belief in an afterlife is almost always tied to powerful confounding factors, such as participation in a community of fellow believers, marital status, age, etc. I imagine that religious affiliation probably can have a strong protective effect regarding suicide - ...


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Google Scholar reveals a substantial quantity of learned research on the topic of exorcisms, of which the items below are but a few: Ferracuti, S., & Sacco, R. (1996). Dissociative trance disorder: clinical and Rorschach findings in ten persons reporting demon possession and treated by exorcism. Journal of personality assessment, 66(3), 525-539. https://...


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Research in this area is pretty patchy. Summarizing what Wikipedia says on the topic: "God helmet" experiments were plagued by failures to reproduce by independent research groups TLE (temporal lobe epilepsy) and its effect known as Geschwind syndrome is one plausible cause... but that does not explain it in all people hippocampal atrophy is a more recent ...


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I'm going to focus on your third question: What does scientific research tell us about why humans have this tendency? I use the word "focus" because, well, I can't answer that. But I can introduce you a field of research that may be able to answer that for you. It's cognitive science of religion: Cognitive science of religion is the study of religious ...


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For a really quick and clear understanding of why sometimes it is better to stay in the container of dogma read Edward Edinger's Moby Dick. Jung's position is that religious energy must only sometimes be defended against. The entire process of Jungian Analysis does, in fact, consist of a process of contacting one's own religious experience in a first-hand, ...


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Psychologically, guilt can be described as "a feeling of responsibility or remorse for some offense, crime, wrong, etc., whether real or imagined" (Dictionary.com). Guilt is an emotion triggered by a belief that you did something wrong, based on what you think is wrong. You can feel guilty after breaking your New year resolution. You can also feel guilty ...


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There are at least two important factors or phenomena at play here. The first is whether the subject of the belief has real-world consequences to the believer. The second is whether the belief relates to groups to which the believer associates or belongs. When a person's belief on a particular matter makes no functional difference to that person, he or she ...


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I don't know about Gupta & Mishra as I cannot find the paper you are referring to, but Allport & Ross (1967) on page 436 (page 5 of the pdf) points out that the full Religious Orientation scale has been deposited with the American Documentation Institute. You need to: Order Document No. 9268 from ADI Auxiliary Publications Project, ...


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Short answer You are confusing belief or faith with a hypothesis. Background Instead of a methodological answer, this question might, perhaps arguably, be tackled better from a slightly more philosophical angle. Let's go through the relevant terminologies. Belief is An acceptance that something exists or is true, especially one without proof. A ...


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Step one would be to define what you mean by "soul". The common Judeo/Christian/Muslim theory is that there is something that (a) is the essential core of a person's personality that is related to the brain but is not synonymous with the electrochemical processes of the brain; and (b) that continues to exist when the body is dead. If you could prove that ...


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One of the common answers is that it's driven by social demands and depends on the cultural expectation and the suggestibility of the individual. I remember an example Spanos used to like to bring up regarding demonic possession. Catholics and protestants had different symptoms for demonic possession and people who exhibited it as a phenomenon each had the ...


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