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Bottom line: No, Josh Pellicer's work is not based on science, not tested, nor peer-reviewed. However, I will qualify this statement slightly below. Many years ago, I listened to a few episodes of the The Tom Leykis Show, yet another highly sexist advice columnnist for men. Josh Pellicer is not the first, and certainly not the last, in a long line of ...


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Major theories of motivation distinguish between implicit and explicit motives - the first refering to (relatively) unconscious, automatically operating motives, the second refering to motives and goals which are accessible for self-reports (McClelland, Koestner, & Weinberger, 1989). Explicit motives are translated into conscious goals, whereas implicit ...


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My answer is probably a weird hodgepodge of sometimes poorly explained stuff, but hopefully it's coherent enough :P For many decades in psychology, we've had a mechanistic stimulus-organism-response understanding of the brain. That is, a stimulus triggers an internal psychological process, which produces some behavioral response. One of the major ...


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Most of your list fits for symptoms of lack of will to cooperate. Lack of will to cooperate is likely triggered by lack of sympathy, which again may be triggered by lack of trust. I say 'may' because there are several possible reasons that such situations may occur. Lack of will to cooperate may also be due to personality traits, especially due to low score ...


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I think what you're talking about is worry and/or rumination, both of which describe a perseverative and repetitive thinking style (e.g., Watkins, 2008). Worry is future-oriented whereas rumination is past-oriented. We don't understand the mechanisms all that well at the level of analysis you're interested in, but I'll present some brain-level theories/data ...


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There are a couple of defence mechanisms that may fit the bill. Keep in mind that these defence mechanisms typically involve an unconscious denial of the problem - ie, they apply to people who don't admit to the problem in themselves. Projection: ... a theory in psychology in which humans defend themselves against unpleasant impulses by denying their ...


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I agree with @Fizz that there is probably no specific name for the type of problem in question, but the behaviour involved is referred to as self-control, or more loosely, willpower. Thus, the type of problem can be referred to as a self-control dilemma: Self-control dilemmas occur when long-term goals and values clash with short-term temptations. ... ...


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Before I answer this question, I would like to point out that at the bottom of Schizophrenia.com is a disclaimer, and part of it says No health information on Schizophrenia.com, including information about herbal therapies and other dietary supplements, is regulated or evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration and therefore the information should not ...


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"There was a significantly higher level of plasma testosterone in the aggressive group as compared with the nonaggressive group or with the other two groups combined. The socially dominant group also had a significantly higher level of testosterone than the nonaggressive group." http://journals.lww.com/psychosomaticmedicine/Abstract/1974/11000/...


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Despite quite of lot of research looking for personality correlates of hypnotisability no very clear links have been found. There is evidence of weak associations between hypnotisability and absorption (the capacity to direct a great deal of attention to a narrow range of stimuli, such as getting caught up in film or book) and also of associations between ...


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This is not my field, but I gave it a quick search. This article seems to speak directly to this question, summarizing and comparing multiple theories to each other. In light of these theories, the article also seems to propose a synthesized theory of the avoidance. Formal citation below. Hope this helps! APA Citation Paul, R. A. (2011). Incest Avoidance: ...


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A heuristic is an approach to problem solving, a bias is a prejudice; so in what way do these terms confuse you? I respectfully disagree. I have noticed that the term bias and heuristic are used interchangeably in the literature that could lead to confusion. The difference between them is subtle. Can anyone explain the difference in a way which can be ...


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History Martin E. P. Seligman, has written extensively on the nature, etiology, and significance of learned helplessness, and in 1975, he broadened the scope of learned helplessness from animal behaviour to a wide variety of human behaviours, including reactive depression, stomach ulcers, voodoo deaths, and child development, then in 1978, he criticised and ...


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But I'm wondering if any of these hormones are linked with physically intimate non-sexual behaviour, like hugs, kisses and cuddles. Kissing is a little messy because it could be characterised as sexual behaviour. However, oxytocin does has a far more broader role in pro-social and affiliative behaviour than just sexual activity. Here's one reference. It ...


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You might be looking at cases of psychological projection, which is a method of denial in which people defend themselves from their own negative impulses by attributing them to others. In accordance with the theory, it is less a problem of 'defending' others from getting anywhere near the problem, and more an act of projecting the problem onto others, or ...


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There are a few terms which can be used for this. The answer from @AlwaysConfused could describe the situation if you are actually talking to them like a child as stipulated in the title, but therapists should not sound patronising or condescending so I wonder if you may be referring to a form of "circumnavigation". The use of circumnavigation may not ...


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First of all, your question title asks about suppression and your question in the main text asks what empirical evidence exists to support the notion that repressed desires will make them stronger? What you need to be careful about here is that repression is different to suppression. Repression is unconscious/subconscious, whereas suppression is ...


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When reading you are performing a trained or learned skill, so if your instruction taught you to follow certain order that's what you do. There is a transfer of this behavior ( or any other learnt one for that matter ),into other types of images and situations,but the degree at which it is transferred depends on both context,cues, and expertise to name a few....


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I don't think there is quite an established term for it; I found several: "difficulty of envisioning long-term consequences" will turn up occasionally in discussing behavior such as smoking "reward obscures risk" is a bit more punchy, but it fails to capture temporal aspect: long-term risk vs short-term reward time preference aka temporal discounting is a ...


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This is a pretty popular research topic! One good place to start might be with the work of Spelke, she's all over this. Try this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nNq_a_wgdgQ If you prefer written words, this paper is a nice broad overview, although note the 2007 publishing date, there's been a fair bit of work since then. Spelke, Elizabeth S., and Katherine ...


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You will have to investigate quite a few factors: There must be a genetic/epigenetic factors to this because we know that personality trait neuroticism has genetic and environmental factors. You should also investigate into stress - biological and psychological stress. Investigating theories of psychological development can also come in handy, especially, ...


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Because we still don't know exactly how the brain works. That's why we do research. If these authors knew the answer ahead of time, neither of them would have done the study. These are research papers, they are showing findings that are consistent with different models. Maybe the real model is somewhere in between, maybe there are context-dependencies, ...


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Inhibitory synapses allows one brain region to suppress activity in another. Since the car is in motion per the laws of motion and momentum, it would be incorrect to say that suppressing one brain region would cause the car to stop moving toward the wall. The closest thing would be if those inhibitory synapses caused one part of your brain to inhibit the ...


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I agree with the previous answer/comments that seeking a simplified abstract model of the brain when it is so complex is probably asking too much. We would need to know a lot more about the "states" you are talking about in order to model them, and in reality the set of "triggers" etc is going to be far too long. However, given your interest and analogy ...


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I don't know if this will help you, but when I first started to see patients (somewhat similar to customers), I was taught by attending physicians that what I felt after a few minutes was most likely what the patient felt because of clues given off by patients in their look, manner, words, posture, etc. If the patient felt hopeless, I started to feel that ...


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People who are entitled tend to have a slower perception of time. In any given situation, a person can feel some level of entitlement. If a person is waiting in line for 10 minutes to check out groceries, he would experience that 10 minutes as passing by very slowly. On the other hand, if that same person was waiting 10 minutes to meet the President, he ...


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One example, I can think of, which is an example of motivation, which does not need to be driven by wanting to accomplish a goal is doing arts. The motivation to play an instrument might be to learn how to master the instrument, but is might as well come from enjoyment of earning how to master the instrument. In the latter case, it is not so important ...


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Short answer Operant conditioning through positive reinforcement is always established by applying a stimulus after the behavior. Negative reinforcers can, however, be deployed before the wanted behavior is initiated. Background The reward system can be seen as positive reinforcement. In experimental paradigms (and everyday life in general), ...


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