6 votes
Accepted

Does nlp have a dependency on a subject having strong visualisation skills?

NLP (Neurolinguistic Programming) is a pseudoscience at worst, and not a science, but "an approach to communication, personal development, and psychotherapy" at best. There is little scientific ...
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  • 2,414
5 votes

Why does autism sometimes impede the ability to produce speech?

Difficulties with language is not actually a symptom of autism. Autism Spectrum Disorder involves difficulties in social communication and interaction, as well as restricted and repetitive interests ...
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  • 376
4 votes

Cost of EEG devices suitable for neurolinguistic research

An old question, but there has been some recent developments by third-parties and now cheaper and hopefully just-as-accurate EEGs exist. From Are recent affordable EEG devices any good? we see the ...
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3 votes

Can you become "mentally" bilingual after 8?

Anecdotally speaking yes, I moved to another country where I couldn't practice my native one and after some years I started thinking in the once foreign one. I am now back to my original country and ...
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  • 577
3 votes

Does the brain generate identical words in different languages similarly?

Here's an article talking about exactly what you are asking: EEG decoding of spoken words in bilingual listeners: from words to language invariant semantic-conceptual representations I can say that ...
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  • 503
3 votes

Technical term for the loss of words in your mother-tongue when speaking a different language

It seems to me that it'd be a type of a tip-of-the-tongue phenomenon caused by bilingualism. If you don't use German regularly, it might be attributed to language attrition, but this seems unlikely if ...
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2 votes
Accepted

Why would someone seek treatment for Apraxia of speech?

There appear to be more than your two basic problems: see Wikipedia's list of characteristics. Subjective difficulty in producing speech appears to be one particularly plausible reason to self-...
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  • 9,274
2 votes
Accepted

Qualitative scoring for responses to design fluency task

To measure the frequencies of different patterns (do some patterns occur more frequently that others based on group) I see this as a chi-squared test of independence. If you are unfamiliar with the ...
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  • 1,263
2 votes

Is there evidence for cross-cultural differences in problem solving skills?

A bit of a broad question as a full answer will really depend on the specifics of the problem being addressed. In short though, yes, cultural factors, and probably to some extent linguistic factors ...
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  • 51
2 votes

Why does autism sometimes impede the ability to produce speech?

What is Autism? Psychologists, psychoanalysts and neuroscientists all commonly apply a triune model of the brain : The Reptilian complex (aka “instinct” aka “the Id”) : where primitive subconscious ...
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2 votes
Accepted

Processing Inverted English Script

Are there any good experiments on the phenomenon of processing inverted text? This is probably the place to start: Poldrack, Russell A., et al. "The neural basis of visual skill learning: an fMRI ...
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  • 1,115
2 votes

Does knowing a word for an emotion cause a person to feel the emotion more frequently?

The answer would be no. To go along with the comments babies feel emotions however do not know words. As they grow adults help them organize their emotions for example a baby cries with frustration ...
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1 vote

Counterfactual thinking and the origin of language

This is controversial, to say the least, and possibly false according to one interpretation on such experiments with monkeys. But note that there is a subtlety here: the way counterfactuals are ...
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  • 9,915
1 vote

Do pictures help young children read (understand meaning) better or does it give them a delayed sense of imagination when decoding information?

I wrote Vexed Texts a long time ago. Since then I have asked the same question and found no research on it, so I did my own research as my doctoral thesis. You can find the results if you want to in ...
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1 vote
Accepted

What is the rationale behind filler words?

What is the rationale behind those constructs from a neurolinguistic point of view? A simple conversation engages multiple areas of the brain, there are temporal areas for recognizing, planning & ...
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  • 577
1 vote
Accepted

Why do we need to break down long sentences to understand them?

First off, the difficulty in the specific example given in the question is more a matter of proper writing habits than anything else. The use of parentheses is often discouraged because it disrupts ...
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  • 19.6k
1 vote

How does the brain encode order of information in sentences/stories?

Similar to your other question, this one reduces to "what are the neural mechanisms behind language?", which is very much a work in progress. The only neural model of language that I currently know ...
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  • 8,783
1 vote
Accepted

Neuronal differences of linguistic statements

Your question reduces to "what are the neural mechanisms behind language?", which is very much a work in progress. The only neural model of language that I currently know of is the Semantic Pointer ...
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  • 8,783
1 vote

relation of substantive/verb to declarative/procedural memory

While it's true that universal nouns will link mostly to other universal nouns (a tree is a plant), and universal verbs will link mostly to other universal verbs (to climb is to move), it is not ...
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  • 11
1 vote

How do we learn to count syllables?

Like most of language, we have an innate ability to learn by exposure, with the rules remaining subconscious until someone forces us to explain them. Syllables are based on phonemes, so we need to ...
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  • 11
1 vote

Chunking and learning vocabulary

I think you've got a reasonable handle on why learning vocabulary in a single, fixed order is probably not a great idea. You may also be interested in what is called context-dependent memory, where ...
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1 vote

Qualitative scoring for responses to design fluency task

This idea of score is interesting, but it's painful to assess if the two problems you raised are important or not. For the re-use of the "meaure group" I think it would be careful to not do it. I took ...
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  • 231
1 vote

Why does autism sometimes impede the ability to produce speech?

There are often motor control issues, the case study below exemplifies these and an approach to overcoming them with help from technology. As well as the below, there are many personal accounts such ...
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1 vote

Do readers consider the passive voice as more authoritative?

Short answer I haven't found scientific literature on it. Non-scientific sources generally do seem to acknowledge that the passive voice radiates authority. Background To answer the question if ...
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1 vote
Accepted

Why is it easier to search memory for words starting with a particular letter than for words with that letter in a later position?

This is a very interesting question. Unfortunately, I was not able to find something that would give you a clear answer. In essence, I think this question is asking for a cognitive mechanism ...
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