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3 votes

Can you become "mentally" bilingual after 8?

Anecdotally speaking yes, I moved to another country where I couldn't practice my native one and after some years I started thinking in the once foreign one. I am now back to my original country and ...
Keno's user avatar
  • 597
3 votes

Does the brain generate identical words in different languages similarly?

Here's an article talking about exactly what you are asking: EEG decoding of spoken words in bilingual listeners: from words to language invariant semantic-conceptual representations I can say that ...
aiwyn's user avatar
  • 503
2 votes

Is there evidence for cross-cultural differences in problem solving skills?

A bit of a broad question as a full answer will really depend on the specifics of the problem being addressed. In short though, yes, cultural factors, and probably to some extent linguistic factors ...
Gerard's user avatar
  • 51
2 votes

Does knowing a word for an emotion cause a person to feel the emotion more frequently?

The answer would be no. To go along with the comments babies feel emotions however do not know words. As they grow adults help them organize their emotions for example a baby cries with frustration ...
Pj Sparkles's user avatar
2 votes

Why does autism sometimes impede the ability to produce speech?

What is Autism? Psychologists, psychoanalysts and neuroscientists all commonly apply a triune model of the brain : The Reptilian complex (aka “instinct” aka “the Id”) : where primitive subconscious ...
John Slegers's user avatar
1 vote

Counterfactual thinking and the origin of language

This is controversial, to say the least, and possibly false according to one interpretation on such experiments with monkeys. But note that there is a subtlety here: the way counterfactuals are ...
against very long user names's user avatar
1 vote

How does the brain encode order of information in sentences/stories?

Similar to your other question, this one reduces to "what are the neural mechanisms behind language?", which is very much a work in progress. The only neural model of language that I currently know ...
Seanny123's user avatar
  • 8,853
1 vote

Do pictures help young children read (understand meaning) better or does it give them a delayed sense of imagination when decoding information?

I wrote Vexed Texts a long time ago. Since then I have asked the same question and found no research on it, so I did my own research as my doctoral thesis. You can find the results if you want to in ...
Pamela Protheroe's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

What is the rationale behind filler words?

What is the rationale behind those constructs from a neurolinguistic point of view? A simple conversation engages multiple areas of the brain, there are temporal areas for recognizing, planning & ...
Keno's user avatar
  • 597
1 vote
Accepted

Why do we need to break down long sentences to understand them?

First off, the difficulty in the specific example given in the question is more a matter of proper writing habits than anything else. The use of parentheses is often discouraged because it disrupts ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.7k
1 vote
Accepted

Neuronal differences of linguistic statements

Your question reduces to "what are the neural mechanisms behind language?", which is very much a work in progress. The only neural model of language that I currently know of is the Semantic Pointer ...
Seanny123's user avatar
  • 8,853
1 vote

Do readers consider the passive voice as more authoritative?

Short answer I haven't found scientific literature on it. Non-scientific sources generally do seem to acknowledge that the passive voice radiates authority. Background To answer the question if ...
AliceD's user avatar
  • 20.7k

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