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NLP (Neurolinguistic Programming) is a pseudoscience at worst, and not a science, but "an approach to communication, personal development, and psychotherapy" at best. There is little scientific research, and no reliable scientific findings, supporting the effectiveness of NLP, and the evidence is probably best interpreted as speaking against the ...


6

Motherese may play a role in emotional development. Soken and Pick write: "Concurrent with the exaggerated speech of motherese, there are probably exaggerated facial displays, allowing infants to explore the particular aspects of the face... Child-centered displays may serve as opportunities for learning about affective events." Walker-Andrews (1997) also ...


6

Sounds like what you're describing is "semantic satiation". Wikipedia explains: The explanation for the phenomenon was that verbal repetition repeatedly aroused a specific neural pattern in the cortex which corresponds to the meaning of the word. Rapid repetition causes both the peripheral sensorimotor activity and the central neural activation to fire ...


5

We were looking for an EEG device few years ago. The commercial offers were between 20,000 EUR for a 32 passive electrode to 50,000 EUR for an 64/128 active electrode. This included everything except the computers - some offers were without off-line data processing software. I never considered the EEG systems that were not mentioned in the method section of ...


5

Difficulties with language is not actually a symptom of autism. Autism Spectrum Disorder involves difficulties in social communication and interaction, as well as restricted and repetitive interests or behaviours (DSM-V, 2013). The term "social communication" is referring to difficulties in the social aspects of language and other communication, such as ...


3

Here's an article talking about exactly what you are asking: EEG decoding of spoken words in bilingual listeners: from words to language invariant semantic-conceptual representations I can say that the brain obviously has the ability to invariantly represent different stimuli as being the same abstract concept, not even from stimuli in the same domain (such ...


3

It seems to me that it'd be a type of a tip-of-the-tongue phenomenon caused by bilingualism. If you don't use German regularly, it might be attributed to language attrition, but this seems unlikely if you're still being exposed to German more than English. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tip-of-the-tongue_phenomenon#Effects_of_bilingualism


3

An old question, but there has been some recent developments by third-parties and now cheaper and hopefully just-as-accurate EEGs exist. From Are recent affordable EEG devices any good? we see the Emotiv System and a paper that can attest to its accuracy. We also have OpenBCI, an open-source EEG catered to makers, which has recently been funded ...


3

Anecdotally speaking yes, I moved to another country where I couldn't practice my native one and after some years I started thinking in the once foreign one. I am now back to my original country and the process is playing out in reverse with some interesting quirks, I translate words rather than retrieve the original ones, something that at one point I did ...


2

Some cognitive scientists I heard are clear about benefits of being bilingual as exposed by @Damien or here - http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/31/science/31conversation.html?_r=0. They also do not hide the associated cognitive costs especially at a young age. I found the following presentation very interesting http://bilingualism.bangor.ac.uk/seminars/...


2

One option is to use Inquisit Web Edition. Here is an example script with a lexical decision task. Unfortunately, it is not free and it requires installation of a plug-in. Version 4 of Inquisit runs on OSX and Windows. Thus, it wont work in Linux or on phones, tablets, etc.


2

There appear to be more than your two basic problems: see Wikipedia's list of characteristics. Subjective difficulty in producing speech appears to be one particularly plausible reason to self-initiate treatment. I don't see any indication of a lack of concern for how speech is received by others. Some forms seem to be progressive, but not all are: ...


2

To measure the frequencies of different patterns (do some patterns occur more frequently that others based on group) I see this as a chi-squared test of independence. If you are unfamiliar with the test, a quick example is here. For your situation, all participants would get the same placements of dots, and you would count how often each possible pattern is ...


2

A bit of a broad question as a full answer will really depend on the specifics of the problem being addressed. In short though, yes, cultural factors, and probably to some extent linguistic factors as well, do impact on problem solving processes. One of the main cross-cultural factors that can alter problem solving is the whole individualism/collectivism ...


2

What is Autism? Psychologists, psychoanalysts and neuroscientists all commonly apply a triune model of the brain : The Reptilian complex (aka “instinct” aka “the Id”) : where primitive subconscious emotions (such as sadness, anger, fear and happiness) reside and which is correlated to primitive neurochemical algorithms that measure one’s capacity to take ...


2

Are there any good experiments on the phenomenon of processing inverted text? This is probably the place to start: Poldrack, Russell A., et al. "The neural basis of visual skill learning: an fMRI study of mirror reading." Cerebral Cortex 8.1 (1998): 1-10. APA What are the underlying mechanisms hypothesized by the quoted papers in processing such text? ...


2

First off, the difficulty in the specific example given in the question is more a matter of proper writing habits than anything else. The use of parentheses is often discouraged because it disrupts sentence structure and therefore interferes with the flow of information. Secondly, the use of referring words (pronouns) to earlier parts of the sentence are ...


2

The answer would be no. To go along with the comments babies feel emotions however do not know words. As they grow adults help them organize their emotions for example a baby cries with frustration and anger because they may be hungry as you get older you have learned how to deal with that experience. As it is impossible to feel any emotion without having a ...


1

What is the rationale behind those constructs from a neurolinguistic point of view? A simple conversation engages multiple areas of the brain, there are temporal areas for recognizing, planning & generating speech, motor areas for executing it,Frontal & PreFrontal areas for making sense of it,defining social context, and memory subsystems for ...


1

To understand why long sentences are difficult to parse we need to understand how we generally parse sentences. In linguistics, often, parse tree are used to show how people structure sentences: Parse Trees A parse tree is a tree structure in which sentences (S) are deconstructed in different phrases. There are noun phrases (NP), in which a noun (N) ...


1

Similar to your other question, this one reduces to "what are the neural mechanisms behind language?", which is very much a work in progress. The only neural model of language that I currently know of is the Semantic Pointer Architecture (SPA), which is largely theoretical and only has some super basic examples. Basically, the SPA represents language as ...


1

Your question reduces to "what are the neural mechanisms behind language?", which is very much a work in progress. The only neural model of language that I currently know of is the Semantic Pointer Architecture (SPA), which is largely theoretical and only has some super basic examples. Basically, the SPA represents language as vector manipulation. The ...


1

While it's true that universal nouns will link mostly to other universal nouns (a tree is a plant), and universal verbs will link mostly to other universal verbs (to climb is to move), it is not necessary that they be in separate memory areas from each other; or even that they be separate from event memory (one cat did climb one tree). The most efficient ...


1

Like most of language, we have an innate ability to learn by exposure, with the rules remaining subconscious until someone forces us to explain them. Syllables are based on phonemes, so we need to know the rules of spelling if we don't already know the word by sound. Each syllable consists of an onset and a rime. The onset is a cluster of consonants (or it ...


1

I think you've got a reasonable handle on why learning vocabulary in a single, fixed order is probably not a great idea. You may also be interested in what is called context-dependent memory, where you recall things best in a context similar to that which you learned those things in (shitty sentence, but you know what I mean).


1

This idea of score is interesting, but it's painful to assess if the two problems you raised are important or not. For the re-use of the "meaure group" I think it would be careful to not do it. I took much thinking over it and I still don't know what to think. Unfortunately, I have no solution, but if I share my different thoughts process here maybe it would ...


1

There are often motor control issues, the case study below exemplifies these and an approach to overcoming them with help from technology. As well as the below, there are many personal accounts such as those of Carly Fleischman and Tito Mukhopadhyay that describe the struggle to align output with inner thought. Language is More than Speech: A Case Study ...


1

Short answer I haven't found scientific literature on it. Non-scientific sources generally do seem to acknowledge that the passive voice radiates authority. Background To answer the question if there's scientific research on this topic - I wasn't able to find anything of value on an, admittedly, quite cursory Google Scholar search. In fact, given the ...


1

This is a very interesting question. Unfortunately, I was not able to find something that would give you a clear answer. In essence, I think this question is asking for a cognitive mechanism underlying word generation in phonemic/phonological verbal fluency test which is a matter that has rarely been addressed (Robinson et al, 2012). Studies such as the ...


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