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12 votes
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What differences of opinion led to the Kahneman-Gigerenzer feud?

I have been quite astonished by this nonsensical yet lasting quarrel. You didn't find how they disagree because they don't disagree. The sole difference is that if asked "are human rational ?", ...
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11 votes
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Why do people fear statistically unlikely things?

This is a great question. There isn't a single reason for this phenomenon. There is a genetic predisposition to certain fears. Though humans are bad at statistics, evolution is quite good at it. ...
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9 votes
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Is there a name for reading things how you meant to write them?

Unofficially, it has been called "illusion of expectation" by Christopher Chabris and Daniel Simons, the guys famous for the Invisible Gorilla experiment. Technically it falls under inattentional ...
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9 votes
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Is there a term for not recognizing that other people think differently, or projecting your thought patterns on others?

Interesting question! Theory of mind is the ability to attribute mental states, motivations, etc. to others and recognize that others have separate intentions, states, and motivations from his or her ...
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9 votes

What is the name of the bias that associate a thing as good because it has a relation to another good thing?

It's called the Halo Effect: The halo effect is a ... cognitive bias, where a person making an initial assessment of another person, place, or thing will assume ambiguous information based upon ...
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8 votes

Does fixing cognitive biases do more harm than use?

"Fixing" (compensating for) a cognitive bias means "improving the result", so by definition, the result is always better. The drawback, as stated, is in the time and resources spent getting there. ...
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8 votes

Why do we always wake up at the climax of our dreams, even when it is an alarm that wakes us?

There are two possibilities. One is that we do tend to wake up more at the climax of dreams, and that somehow our dreams can sync up with external input like an alarm clock so that the climax of the ...
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7 votes
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Is there a term for a person who moves from one field of expertise to a new field and has an inflated belief in their competence in the new field?

Déformation professionnelle is probably the closest match: Déformation professionnelle is a French phrase, meaning a tendency to look at things from the point of view of one's own profession rather ...
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7 votes
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Are men subject to optimism bias when it comes to assessing their sexual/romantic appeal?

Short answer: Yes, but not really... Self-enhancement: Self-enhancement (sometimes referred to as positive illusions) refers to a general preference for positive self-views (in men and women alike). ...
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7 votes
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Term for when the more you invest yourself in something, the less you agree to drop it

Not certain this is what you are thinking about, but this sounds a lot like the idea of "sunk costs", which is a form of loss aversion. Sunk costs means that you tend to overvalue the effort you have ...
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7 votes

Name of cognitive bias that causes experts to overestimate their ability in other areas?

The Dunning-Kruger effect is specific to expertise in a particular domain. The domains tested in the original studies by Kruger & Dunning (1999) are: humor, logical reasoning, and English grammar. ...
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7 votes

Is most of Kahneman's 'Thinking fast and slow' not supported by evidence/non replicable?

This is complicated. There's no easy answer, but the outlook for replicability/reproducibility of a lot of the empirical evidence is not great. The R-index (that the blog authors use to rank the ...
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  • 509
6 votes
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Is memory biased towards positive or negative memories?

The short answer is: it depends on age. For younger adults, negative memories last longer than positive memories. The opposite is true for older adults (above 60 years old). This paper is a good ...
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6 votes
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Name of cognitive bias when you diminish one's competency based on someone else's for the same function?

The broad topic is norm theory. Kahnemann & Miller (1986) give a nice overview of the topic. The specific effect is a contrast effect. Higgins & Lurie (1983) have an experiment which matches ...
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6 votes

What is the psychological term for disregarding correct but unwanted information?

The term I would use is "cognitive dissonance." That is, there is "dissonance" between the result of one's cognitive processes, and the actual truth. According to psychologist Leon Festinger, people ...
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6 votes
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What is the correlation between self-rated and objective measures of intelligence?

The term you are looking for is self-assessed intelligence (SAI) (sometimes subjectively-assessed intelligence or self-estimated intelligence). The leaders in this field are Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic ...
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6 votes

What is the difference between a bias and a heuristic explained in layman terms?

A heuristic is an approach to problem solving, a bias is a prejudice; so in what way do these terms confuse you? I respectfully disagree. I have noticed that the term bias and heuristic are used ...
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6 votes

What is the difference between hindsight bias and confirmation bias?

Hindsight Bias (Also known as the "knew-it-all-along phenomenon"), is the tendency when an individual assumes that he/she knew and predicted an outcome after the outcome has been determined (...
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  • 91
5 votes

What is the name of a cognitive bias by which existing facts are tailored to fit a personal hypothesis?

"I think you are referring to confirmation bias" (from wikipedia) Confirmation bias, also called myside bias, is the tendency to search for, interpret, or prioritize information in a way that ...
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5 votes
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Is there a name for a scientist's resistance to disconfirmation of his or her theories?

I understand confirmation bias as including this. The Wikipedia page you link has a section on "persistence of discredited beliefs" that corroborates my perspective: Confirmation biases can be used ...
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5 votes

Is there a name for a scientist's resistance to disconfirmation of his or her theories?

This isn't quite what you are looking for, but it's close enough that it might help you find additional information. Munro (2010) found evidence that people tend to discount the scientific ...
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5 votes
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Why do children tend to choose the last option in a two-alternative forced choice task?

In general, and not specifically related to children, choosing out of a set of options often depends on people’s memory. In an ideal world, people’s options would be presented simultaneously, but in ...
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5 votes

Double blindedness in a fully remote trial

Double blind basically consists when the patient does not know to which condition it belongs (control, treatment A, treatment B) and the professional does not know to which group he/she is ...
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5 votes
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Name of the bias towards not seeing small harm of many as important?

Yes. This is a special case of the identifiable victim effect: the cognitive bias implicated in the quote, "A single death is a tragedy; a million deaths is a statistic." The identifiable victim ...
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5 votes

What's the technical name for this cognitive bias?

I am not entirely sure about the proper scientific names but I think your issue revolves around buying things because they are cheap; hard to find. The first is a notorious reason to buy stuff; the ...
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5 votes

What's the technical name for this cognitive bias?

Not sure what you describe is a cognitive bias in itself, but I suspect the scarcity heuristic may be part of the purchaser's rationalization. (See the wikipedia article for academic references.)
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  • 151
5 votes

Why do we long for freedom?

Too lazy to paraphrase right now, so quoting from a newsletter Brehm [the guy how introduced the notion Psychological Reactance--my note] has made but one remark about why people seem to behave as ...
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  • 9,915
5 votes
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Baby Names and the Hive Mind

There are probably a number of factors at play here. One important contribution to the "snowballing" of trends like this is the mere exposure effect by which things we encounter repeatedly become ...
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