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9 votes

What is the name of the bias that associate a thing as good because it has a relation to another good thing?

It's called the Halo Effect: The halo effect is a ... cognitive bias, where a person making an initial assessment of another person, place, or thing will assume ambiguous information based upon ...
Arnon Weinberg's user avatar
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8 votes
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Term for when the more you invest yourself in something, the less you agree to drop it

Not certain this is what you are thinking about, but this sounds a lot like the idea of "sunk costs", which is a form of loss aversion. Sunk costs means that you tend to overvalue the effort you have ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
  • 7,586
8 votes

Name of cognitive bias that causes experts to overestimate their ability in other areas?

The Dunning-Kruger effect is specific to expertise in a particular domain. The domains tested in the original studies by Kruger & Dunning (1999) are: humor, logical reasoning, and English grammar. ...
Steven Jeuris's user avatar
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8 votes

Is most of Kahneman's 'Thinking fast and slow' not supported by evidence/non replicable?

This is complicated. There's no easy answer, but the outlook for replicability/reproducibility of a lot of the empirical evidence is not great. The R-index (that the blog authors use to rank the ...
pep's user avatar
  • 569
7 votes

What is the difference between a bias and a heuristic explained in layman terms?

A heuristic is an approach to problem solving, a bias is a prejudice; so in what way do these terms confuse you? I respectfully disagree. I have noticed that the term bias and heuristic are used ...
faustus's user avatar
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6 votes
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Is memory biased towards positive or negative memories?

The short answer is: it depends on age. For younger adults, negative memories last longer than positive memories. The opposite is true for older adults (above 60 years old). This paper is a good ...
Sophy's user avatar
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6 votes
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What is the correlation between self-rated and objective measures of intelligence?

The term you are looking for is self-assessed intelligence (SAI) (sometimes subjectively-assessed intelligence or self-estimated intelligence). The leaders in this field are Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic ...
Arnon Weinberg's user avatar
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6 votes

What is the primary source of the "mount stupid" graphic?

Short answer The cartoon graphics showing mount stupid seem to be exaggerated, popular-scientific representations, and should, as far as I can see, be regarded as schematics to illustrate a more ...
AliceD's user avatar
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6 votes

What is the difference between hindsight bias and confirmation bias?

Hindsight Bias (Also known as the "knew-it-all-along phenomenon"), is the tendency when an individual assumes that he/she knew and predicted an outcome after the outcome has been determined (...
Jerry's user avatar
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6 votes
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Wisdom of crowds vs group polarization

Great question. Wisdom of crowds happens when participants are motivated to find a "correct" answer. The classic example is counting jelly beans in a jar - where the average of guesses ...
Arnon Weinberg's user avatar
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5 votes

Double blindedness in a fully remote trial

Double blind basically consists when the patient does not know to which condition it belongs (control, treatment A, treatment B) and the professional does not know to which group he/she is ...
hexadecimal's user avatar
  • 1,069
5 votes

Name of the psychological phenomenon of doing something just because you've already started doing it?

Although Cognitive Inertia (as mentioned by hexadecimal) is a nice, broad way to point to the phenomenon, people have also studied it from other points of view. Two of them are from economic and ...
user1995's user avatar
  • 189
5 votes

How do clinicians control for their own mental disorders?

Clinical Supervision (see these articles on effectiveness) is standard practice and required in codes of practice for registered counsellors, psychotherapists, psychologists, psychiatrists, etc. and ...
Chris Rogers's user avatar
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5 votes
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Why do children tend to choose the last option in a two-alternative forced choice task?

In general, and not specifically related to children, choosing out of a set of options often depends on people’s memory. In an ideal world, people’s options would be presented simultaneously, but in ...
AliceD's user avatar
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5 votes
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What is the primary source of the "mount stupid" graphic?

A recent video essay on YouTube covers this topic quite well. The creator also failed to find a primary source for the "mount stupid" graphic, and concurs that it is not related to the ...
Arnon Weinberg's user avatar
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5 votes
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Name of the bias towards not seeing small harm of many as important?

Yes. This is a special case of the identifiable victim effect: the cognitive bias implicated in the quote, "A single death is a tragedy; a million deaths is a statistic." The identifiable victim ...
eyeExWhy's user avatar
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5 votes

What's the technical name for this cognitive bias?

I am not entirely sure about the proper scientific names but I think your issue revolves around buying things because they are cheap; hard to find. The first is a notorious reason to buy stuff; the ...
AliceD's user avatar
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5 votes

What's the technical name for this cognitive bias?

Not sure what you describe is a cognitive bias in itself, but I suspect the scarcity heuristic may be part of the purchaser's rationalization. (See the wikipedia article for academic references.)
ultramoka's user avatar
  • 151
5 votes

Why do we long for freedom?

Too lazy to paraphrase right now, so quoting from a newsletter Brehm [the guy how introduced the notion Psychological Reactance--my note] has made but one remark about why people seem to behave as ...
got trolled too much this week's user avatar
5 votes
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Baby Names and the Hive Mind

There are probably a number of factors at play here. One important contribution to the "snowballing" of trends like this is the mere exposure effect by which things we encounter repeatedly become ...
Rose Hartman's user avatar
5 votes
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Should I look at the data of an experiment before the dataset is complete?

Short answer From an ethical standpoint, not including interim evaluations may be bad practice. Background I will start off with a more extreme case than in your question example, just for ...
AliceD's user avatar
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5 votes

Should I look at the data of an experiment before the dataset is complete?

gjacob is correct that optional stopping is a common research degree of freedom, and one that has a considerable and unfortunate intuitive basis. Yet, depending on the context of your research, AliceD'...
jsakaluk's user avatar
  • 286
5 votes

What is the bias that arises because a thing is way more common than the rest?

Wikipedia refers to "regressive bias" though I admit I have never heard the term used, defined as: A certain state of mind wherein high values and high likelihoods are overestimated while low ...
Bryan Krause's user avatar
  • 7,586
4 votes

What is the name of the cognitive bias where an expert overestimates the knowledge of others?

Reminds me of (one side of) the Dunning–Kruger effect, where "people of high ability incorrectly assume that tasks that are easy for them are also easy for other people."
JimmyB's user avatar
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4 votes
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How do brain zaps occur?

Here's the only speculation I could find about brain shivers aka brain zaps. Cortes JA, Radhakrishnan R. A Case of Amelioration of Venlafaxine-Discontinuation “Brain Shivers” With Atomoxetine The ...
FDIA's user avatar
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4 votes
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Cognitive bias of comparing numbers on a relative scale

It's been called “relative thinking” in a few places (eg http://journal.sjdm.org/11/10921/jdm10921.html). The earliest I can find is in a 2004 article by Ofer Azar. A Google Scholar search turns up ...
Jonathan Shi's user avatar
4 votes
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How might the "Imposter Syndrome" typology be reconciled with the robustness of the "self-serving bias"?

You might as well ask how comes there's depression (or low self-esteem in general) if everyone has self-serving bias. The answer is that the self-serving bias is reduced in depressed individuals; see ...
got trolled too much this week's user avatar
4 votes
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Name of false answer effect in surveys

This is called "demand characteristics": ... an experimental artifact where participants form an interpretation of the experiment's purpose and unconsciously change their behavior to fit that ...
Arnon Weinberg's user avatar
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4 votes

Term for when the more you invest yourself in something, the less you agree to drop it

It's an extension of the Endowment effect: In psychology and behavioral economics, the endowment effect (also known as divestiture aversion and related to the mere ownership effect in social ...
JoaoBotelho's user avatar
4 votes
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What research is there on how people go from examining/gathering evidence to executing on a decision?

It's possible that there is no sharp threshold between information gathering and acting. A recent paper by Piantadosi exploring that possibility, and citing a ton of (admittedly more conventional/...
steveLangsford's user avatar

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