15

Depends which IQ test you use - individuals with ASDs show a typical "pattern" on the WAIS, which can cause it to appear like they have lower IQs. When tested with tests which aren't biased in this way, they appear to have the same IQ range as neurotypicals. The assumption that those with an ASD are cognitively impaired pervades both popular and scientific ...


13

I don't think this is a serious scientific theory at all. The "theory" makes many assumptions about the supposed behaviour of Neanderthals that are not based on evidence, e.g. that they preferred cold to heat. Archaeological evidence indicates that they used fire. There is also a lack of evidence that their social skills were on par with those of autistic ...


13

I don't know if it's a reasonable scientific theory, but here's some more info: Autism: The Eusocial Hominid Hypothesis ASDs (autism spectrum disorders) are hypothesized as one of many adaptive human cognitive variations that have been maintained in modern populations via multiple genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. Introgression from "archaic" hominids (...


13

First question, how deep is your knowledge about autism and Asperger Syndrome? Do you understand how autistic people think? Do you understand, what this girl have meant, when she have written, she doesn't really understand what each means? For neurotypical person, a typical use-case for I understand you phrase is I know what you feel. But autistic people by ...


12

I am by no means any sort of expert at the French mental health system, but I was curious and found a few reasons that may indicate why such a philosophy is prevalent. In this blog, an American psychologist analyzes the differences between the American and French schools of thought on ADHD, but the observations hold for other conditions as well. While ...


11

Assuming there's not a neurological dysfunction underlying sleep deprivation (which is even more possible with Aspergers as sleep dysfunction is a typical comorbidity) it can simply be a learned behavior. The more you do something (whether you particularly "enjoy" it or not) the more likely you are to build it up as a habit. Procedural memory is always at ...


10

Most neuroscientists have dropped the right brain-left brain differentiation because cross-over of functions at multiple levels is now so widely recognized. So your understanding of two left brains is not current (if it ever was).


10

Short answer: Some traits of Asperger's are found in those with high intelligence, and vice versa. In the grander scheme of things, however, it appears that correlation does not imply causation. Longer answer: AS was first described in 1944 by Austrian physician Hans Asperger. He considered it to be a personality disorder characterized by pedantic speech ...


10

Sounds no more dubious than the pop-psychological view of Neandertals in general. One should be aware that the real picture of what Neandertals were, and how various modern human populations are related to them, has changed very rapidly in recent years. I doubt the claims you include about Neanderthal society. We have no idea about to what degree a ...


9

Well that looks like the behavior of any person with a strong passion and focus for his work. There are plenty of these around! I guess it would be more common in any field of work were people already have dedicated a significant part of their life to it, and where it is almost a prerequisite. Being a mathematician selects and cultivates people able to ...


8

In light of a recent question in MedicalSciences.SE, I thought I would update this answer to include some information from my answer there. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) now affects one in 68 births in the United States and is the fastest growing neurodevelopmental disability worldwide (Edmiston, et al. 2017) [free access paper with links to cited papers]. ...


8

Anybody with enough will and persistence can find support for almost any viewpoint they desire concerning autism, depending especially on (lower) quality of source material. However, if you read enough, consistent patterns will emerge in the literature. This issue of Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience is all about autism. Although all of it is valuable, I ...


8

There's a very small percent of people who enjoy the adrenaline of mental exhaustion. While that signals most people to stop, there are people who will continue exhausting themselves. This isn't physiologically healthy. You need to recognize when you're worn out and rest. Don't get hyper-focused on your problem.


7

You could take the AQ Test, which is based on the Autism Spectrum Quotient. It was published by the Autism Research Center at Cambridge University. It doesn't give you a diagnosis, but rather suggests that some have more autistic traits based on their score. It measures autistic tendencies other than ones that would be considered a disorder, like most in the ...


6

I'd like to expand on volkerjaan's answer. I am Asperger myself. I know what :-), ;-) and ;-( mean (though I know ^^ only as see above). I don't necessarily understand when people are using them. I do understand their origins, and I suspect that is what the question boils down to. To explain what they mean: :-) — person feels happy :-( — person feels sad ;-...


6

Two additional points to the previous answer from what. With the release of the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), Asperger's is no longer classified as a condition in its own right, but as Autism coupled with high intelligence and intact language skills. Almost all accounts of Autism hold that it exists as a ...


4

If you define mental disorder as any behavior not applying to (more or less arbitrary) social norms, then yes, the activity you describe would probably be considered mental disorder. However, the same would apply for example to: homosexualism most hobbies asceticism and religious devotion playing and listening to music The last may seem odd, but Plato have ...


4

I don't know what the author(s) or editors intended this to mean exactly, but I would guess that examples could include smiling, shrugging, head-scratching, pointing, holding out one's hand to invite a handshake, management of personal space, etc. I'd love to know if I'm incorrect on any of these, but I'm a little pessimistic about finding out TBH. There may ...


4

Schizoid personality disorder is characterized by a lack of interest in social relationships. However, with asperger syndrome, it's a limited empathy and understanding of other's situations. In other words, asperger syndrome deals with the inability to empathize while schizoid personality disorder deals with apathy toward other's emotions. Additionally, ...


4

Symptoms of Asperger’s Syndrome difficulty recognizing social cues awkward body language social isolation aloofness fixation on certain objects The picture (and idea) that “stacking cans” is in itself a sign of Asperger’s is misleading at best. One could just as easily say this child is making “a tower”, a common activity amongst children. Asperger at ...


2

No. I can't seem to find a specific study into professional mathematicians or graduate students so far, the studies always seem to group the occupations together. However, Baron-Cohen's team has done an impressive national survey (Ruzich et al., 2015) and recruited nearly half a million people through a UK TV show. They managed to get over 450,394 survey ...


2

It is difficult to identify autism definitively in other species, especially since autism encompasses a very diverse group of people who have different experiences. However, because there is so much interest in studying autism, researchers have developed models for autism in model organisms, specifically in mice, which share some of the diagnostic features ...


2

This is a very good question. It's true that there might be some problems to differentiate Asperger's Syndrome and Schizoid Personality Disorder, infact, according to DSM-5 Individuals with a Schizoid Personality Disorder shows a pattern of dethachment from social relationships and a restricted range of emotional expression. Moreover, the manual specifies ...


1

"The more you do something (whether you particularly "enjoy" it or not) the more likely you are to build it up as a habit" This simply is not the case. "So in this regard, it can be addictive behavior in the same way a "bad habit" can." Bad habits can not be "addictive". That is not what either word means. IN fact, sleep deprivation leads to an alteration ...


1

No. Everyone is not a little bit autistic. Everyone may not be "typically developing" in some or some aspect; but autism is not universal. Apparently Same symptoms or same behaviour may have complete different reasons. Aspergers is predominately a communication problem and problem with social guesswork. Usually a vast number of other complaints co-occur ...


1

Simon Baron-Cohen developed a relevant tool for this question: the autism-spectrum quotient (AQ). A test is available here. Here are the abstracts of two papers of Baron-Cohen et al.: "The Autism-Spectrum Quotient (AQ): Evidence from Asperger Syndrome/High-Functioning Autism, Males and Females, Scientists and Mathematicians": Abstract: Currently ...


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