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15

Depends which IQ test you use - individuals with ASDs show a typical "pattern" on the WAIS, which can cause it to appear like they have lower IQs. When tested with tests which aren't biased in this way, they appear to have the same IQ range as neurotypicals. The assumption that those with an ASD are cognitively impaired pervades both popular and scientific ...


13

I don't think this is a serious scientific theory at all. The "theory" makes many assumptions about the supposed behaviour of Neanderthals that are not based on evidence, e.g. that they preferred cold to heat. Archaeological evidence indicates that they used fire. There is also a lack of evidence that their social skills were on par with those of autistic ...


13

I don't know if it's a reasonable scientific theory, but here's some more info: Autism: The Eusocial Hominid Hypothesis ASDs (autism spectrum disorders) are hypothesized as one of many adaptive human cognitive variations that have been maintained in modern populations via multiple genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. Introgression from "archaic" hominids (...


13

First question, how deep is your knowledge about autism and Asperger Syndrome? Do you understand how autistic people think? Do you understand, what this girl have meant, when she have written, she doesn't really understand what each means? For neurotypical person, a typical use-case for I understand you phrase is I know what you feel. But autistic people by ...


12

I am by no means any sort of expert at the French mental health system, but I was curious and found a few reasons that may indicate why such a philosophy is prevalent. In this blog, an American psychologist analyzes the differences between the American and French schools of thought on ADHD, but the observations hold for other conditions as well. While ...


11

Sociologists King and Bearman have been looking into this (see King & Bearman, 2009a; King & Bearman, 2009b; King & Bearman, 2011; King et al., 2009). They estimate that some of the increases in ASD identification are due to the following: 25% attributed to diagnostic accretion - particularly children with mental retardation now being ...


11

Assuming there's not a neurological dysfunction underlying sleep deprivation (which is even more possible with Aspergers as sleep dysfunction is a typical comorbidity) it can simply be a learned behavior. The more you do something (whether you particularly "enjoy" it or not) the more likely you are to build it up as a habit. Procedural memory is always at ...


10

Feeling as though you have seen a face before is perfectly normal. It may reflect actual similarities between the new face and the face you have seen before. There are people who genuinely look like each other, an example being celebrity look-a-likes. It may also reflect a commonly observed cultural/ethnic effect where people of a different ethnicity look ...


10

This is a partial answer suggesting a possible causal mechanism. One of the factors leading to birth defects and autism is mutations in the parent's genetic material. In a recently published article, Sun et al. (2012) observed that: The paternal-to-maternal mutation rate ratio is 3.3, and the rate in fathers doubles from age 20 to 58, whereas there is no ...


10

I believe the answer lies in minicolumnar morphology in the neocortex. It's been shown that the minicolumns of autsitics and gifted individuals have narrower minicolumns, with greater spacing between each minicolumn. It's speculated that this creates an increased ability to distinguish percepts. Here is a paper on the topic: Casanova MF, Switala AE, Trippe ...


10

Sounds no more dubious than the pop-psychological view of Neandertals in general. One should be aware that the real picture of what Neandertals were, and how various modern human populations are related to them, has changed very rapidly in recent years. I doubt the claims you include about Neanderthal society. We have no idea about to what degree a ...


9

Generally speaking, yes; it's relatively more common for psychosis to be comorbid with or present after diagnosed Autism. For a good overview of this topic read Autism and Schizophrenia (Yael Dvir, MD and Jean A. Frazier, MD). COS (Child Onset Schizophrenia)—the onset of psychosis before age 13 years—is considered a rare and severe form of schizophrenia....


9

Researchers at Boston Children's Hospital compared raw EEG data from 430 children with autism to data collected from 554 control subjects, all ages 2 to 12. They found that children with autism displayed consistent EEG patterns which indicate altered connectivity between brain regions. They found evidence of altered connectivity throughout the brains of ...


9

Well that looks like the behavior of any person with a strong passion and focus for his work. There are plenty of these around! I guess it would be more common in any field of work were people already have dedicated a significant part of their life to it, and where it is almost a prerequisite. Being a mathematician selects and cultivates people able to ...


8

Anybody with enough will and persistence can find support for almost any viewpoint they desire concerning autism, depending especially on (lower) quality of source material. However, if you read enough, consistent patterns will emerge in the literature. This issue of Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience is all about autism. Although all of it is valuable, I ...


8

There's a very small percent of people who enjoy the adrenaline of mental exhaustion. While that signals most people to stop, there are people who will continue exhausting themselves. This isn't physiologically healthy. You need to recognize when you're worn out and rest. Don't get hyper-focused on your problem.


8

The Flynn effect refers to the tendency over the last century or so for IQ scores to increase each generation by a few points. There is no link between vaccination and autism. It is pseudo-scientific myth, which has dangerous consequences for public health. see discussion here. I'm no expert in autism research, but in general, children with autism have ...


8

In light of a recent question in MedicalSciences.SE, I thought I would update this answer to include some information from my answer there. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) now affects one in 68 births in the United States and is the fastest growing neurodevelopmental disability worldwide (Edmiston, et al. 2017) [free access paper with links to cited papers]. ...


7

In general, no. People with excellent memories can just as easily misapply the availability heuristic as people with poor memories. To see why, consider a situation where a reasoner is asked to estimate the relative frequency of murder and suicide. Because examples of murder or more "available" (i.e., more easily recalled) than examples of suicide, the ...


7

You could take the AQ Test, which is based on the Autism Spectrum Quotient. It was published by the Autism Research Center at Cambridge University. It doesn't give you a diagnosis, but rather suggests that some have more autistic traits based on their score. It measures autistic tendencies other than ones that would be considered a disorder, like most in the ...


6

I'd like to expand on volkerjaan's answer. I am Asperger myself. I know what :-), ;-) and ;-( mean (though I know ^^ only as see above). I don't necessarily understand when people are using them. I do understand their origins, and I suspect that is what the question boils down to. To explain what they mean: :-) — person feels happy :-( — person feels sad ;-...


6

How one performs quick mental calculations through tricks and shortcuts can easily be looked up on the internet. How some Savant's do it cannot because we don't know. There is some argument that some do those same tricks but others seem not to do so. Consider that a substantial amount of computational power goes into immediately recognizing that your ...


5

While quantitative changes like the ones described in the EEG in the other answer are critical in distinguishing an person with autism from a non-autistic person, they are not really diagnostic tools yet. You had mentioned the possibility of using a CT scan for a diagnosis. As far as I can tell, there is no way of doing this as of late, but several groups ...


5

Difficulties with language is not actually a symptom of autism. Autism Spectrum Disorder involves difficulties in social communication and interaction, as well as restricted and repetitive interests or behaviours (DSM-V, 2013). The term "social communication" is referring to difficulties in the social aspects of language and other communication, such as ...


4

If you define mental disorder as any behavior not applying to (more or less arbitrary) social norms, then yes, the activity you describe would probably be considered mental disorder. However, the same would apply for example to: homosexualism most hobbies asceticism and religious devotion playing and listening to music The last may seem odd, but Plato have ...


4

I don't know what the author(s) or editors intended this to mean exactly, but I would guess that examples could include smiling, shrugging, head-scratching, pointing, holding out one's hand to invite a handshake, management of personal space, etc. I'd love to know if I'm incorrect on any of these, but I'm a little pessimistic about finding out TBH. There may ...


4

Asperger's being "subsumed" in DSM-5 is not the whole story. There's indeed a new DSM-5 coding for the severity of the disorder. But applying the DSM-5 actual clinical criteria results in fewer people being diagnosed with autistic spectrum disorders, and the reduction is more significant for the mild versions (such as Asperger's): A 2014 mini-review looking ...


4

It is important to remember when reading this question and answer is that Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) does not develop in adulthood, but symptoms can change for individuals over time because learning occurs. Symptoms of ASD come in all shapes and forms because this is a spectrum disorder and therefore people present somewhere on a spectrum, often ...


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