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13

I don't think this is a serious scientific theory at all. The "theory" makes many assumptions about the supposed behaviour of Neanderthals that are not based on evidence, e.g. that they preferred cold to heat. Archaeological evidence indicates that they used fire. There is also a lack of evidence that their social skills were on par with those of autistic ...


13

First question, how deep is your knowledge about autism and Asperger Syndrome? Do you understand how autistic people think? Do you understand, what this girl have meant, when she have written, she doesn't really understand what each means? For neurotypical person, a typical use-case for I understand you phrase is I know what you feel. But autistic people by ...


12

I am by no means any sort of expert at the French mental health system, but I was curious and found a few reasons that may indicate why such a philosophy is prevalent. In this blog, an American psychologist analyzes the differences between the American and French schools of thought on ADHD, but the observations hold for other conditions as well. While ...


11

Sociologists King and Bearman have been looking into this (see King & Bearman, 2009a; King & Bearman, 2009b; King & Bearman, 2011; King et al., 2009). They estimate that some of the increases in ASD identification are due to the following: 25% attributed to diagnostic accretion - particularly children with mental retardation now being ...


10

Sounds no more dubious than the pop-psychological view of Neandertals in general. One should be aware that the real picture of what Neandertals were, and how various modern human populations are related to them, has changed very rapidly in recent years. I doubt the claims you include about Neanderthal society. We have no idea about to what degree a ...


9

Generally speaking, yes; it's relatively more common for psychosis to be comorbid with or present after diagnosed Autism. For a good overview of this topic read Autism and Schizophrenia (Yael Dvir, MD and Jean A. Frazier, MD). COS (Child Onset Schizophrenia)—the onset of psychosis before age 13 years—is considered a rare and severe form of schizophrenia....


9

Well that looks like the behavior of any person with a strong passion and focus for his work. There are plenty of these around! I guess it would be more common in any field of work were people already have dedicated a significant part of their life to it, and where it is almost a prerequisite. Being a mathematician selects and cultivates people able to ...


8

In light of a recent question in MedicalSciences.SE, I thought I would update this answer to include some information from my answer there. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) now affects one in 68 births in the United States and is the fastest growing neurodevelopmental disability worldwide (Edmiston, et al. 2017) [free access paper with links to cited papers]. ...


8

The Flynn effect refers to the tendency over the last century or so for IQ scores to increase each generation by a few points. There is no link between vaccination and autism. It is pseudo-scientific myth, which has dangerous consequences for public health. see discussion here. I'm no expert in autism research, but in general, children with autism have ...


8

Anybody with enough will and persistence can find support for almost any viewpoint they desire concerning autism, depending especially on (lower) quality of source material. However, if you read enough, consistent patterns will emerge in the literature. This issue of Dialogues in Clinical Neuroscience is all about autism. Although all of it is valuable, I ...


8

There's a very small percent of people who enjoy the adrenaline of mental exhaustion. While that signals most people to stop, there are people who will continue exhausting themselves. This isn't physiologically healthy. You need to recognize when you're worn out and rest. Don't get hyper-focused on your problem.


7

You could take the AQ Test, which is based on the Autism Spectrum Quotient. It was published by the Autism Research Center at Cambridge University. It doesn't give you a diagnosis, but rather suggests that some have more autistic traits based on their score. It measures autistic tendencies other than ones that would be considered a disorder, like most in the ...


6

I'd like to expand on volkerjaan's answer. I am Asperger myself. I know what :-), ;-) and ;-( mean (though I know ^^ only as see above). I don't necessarily understand when people are using them. I do understand their origins, and I suspect that is what the question boils down to. To explain what they mean: :-) — person feels happy :-( — person feels sad ;-...


5

Difficulties with language is not actually a symptom of autism. Autism Spectrum Disorder involves difficulties in social communication and interaction, as well as restricted and repetitive interests or behaviours (DSM-V, 2013). The term "social communication" is referring to difficulties in the social aspects of language and other communication, such as ...


4

If you define mental disorder as any behavior not applying to (more or less arbitrary) social norms, then yes, the activity you describe would probably be considered mental disorder. However, the same would apply for example to: homosexualism most hobbies asceticism and religious devotion playing and listening to music The last may seem odd, but Plato have ...


4

I don't know what the author(s) or editors intended this to mean exactly, but I would guess that examples could include smiling, shrugging, head-scratching, pointing, holding out one's hand to invite a handshake, management of personal space, etc. I'd love to know if I'm incorrect on any of these, but I'm a little pessimistic about finding out TBH. There may ...


4

Possibly of interest: 2011 study from Berkeley, published in the Journal of Neuroscience: Pulling an all-nighter can bring on euphoria and risky behavior: https://news.berkeley.edu/2011/03/22/pulling-an-all-nighter/


4

Asperger's being "subsumed" in DSM-5 is not the whole story. There's indeed a new DSM-5 coding for the severity of the disorder. But applying the DSM-5 actual clinical criteria results in fewer people being diagnosed with autistic spectrum disorders, and the reduction is more significant for the mild versions (such as Asperger's): A 2014 mini-review looking ...


4

It is important to remember when reading this question and answer is that Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) does not develop in adulthood, but symptoms can change for individuals over time because learning occurs. Symptoms of ASD come in all shapes and forms because this is a spectrum disorder and therefore people present somewhere on a spectrum, often ...


4

Symptoms of Asperger’s Syndrome difficulty recognizing social cues awkward body language social isolation aloofness fixation on certain objects The picture (and idea) that “stacking cans” is in itself a sign of Asperger’s is misleading at best. One could just as easily say this child is making “a tower”, a common activity amongst children. Asperger at ...


3

You don't say what language you want the tests to be in, so I'm assuming English. In the book Evidence-Based Assessment in ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder), author Kenneth J. Aitken "describes and analyses a wide range of available Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) assessment measures". The chapter on "Attention" lists the following tests: Conners' Continuous ...


3

Why might sleeping on the floor alleviate PTSD symptoms? Question: Does sleeping on the floor have similar neurotransmitter effects, as sleeping under a weighted blanket might? Psychiatrically, would it be expected that a person having PTSD would find similar results sleeping under a weighted blanket as they do when they sleep on the floor? There is also a ...


3

Clark et al, 2008 show impairment in ASD individuals for detection of the emotional content of microexpressions. In general, ASD individuals have trouble discriminating the nuance of facial expressions (though some argue otherwise: see for example Ozonoff et al 1990), for example the differences between genuine smiles and posed smiles (for example, Boraston ...


2

The evidence in support of binaural beats as a therapeutic tool is sketchy: Is there scientific evidence on the benefits of binaural beats? Given our lack of understanding of if binaural beats can cause entrainment in the brain, never mind how they cause entrainment, it is not possibly to make conclusions about how the binaural beat would affect the autistic ...


2

Robot-assisted therapy doesn't automatically mean that it is separate kind of therapy. You may for example teach an imitation by ABA principles with the robot. In other words, you are following traditional therapies but also using a robot. Kids may benefit from robot-assisted therapy primarily because robots are usually reinforcement for them, i.e. kids ...


2

There are many issues packed into this question. I am pretty sure the answers will lead to many more questions. People diagnosed with autism tend to perform worse than the average population on standard IQ tests, but there is evidence that alternative measures of "intelligence" (whatever that is) are more accurate and demonstrate that autistic persons, as a ...


2

What is Autism? Psychologists, psychoanalysts and neuroscientists all commonly apply a triune model of the brain : The Reptilian complex (aka “instinct” aka “the Id”) : where primitive subconscious emotions (such as sadness, anger, fear and happiness) reside and which is correlated to primitive neurochemical algorithms that measure one’s capacity to take ...


2

High-functioning autism along with Asperger's syndrome were both subsumed by Autism Spectrum Disorder in the DSM-5 in 2013. The Autism Society has a good page on the distinctions and history of these various diagnoses.


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