19

In short, no. Perry's essay is amusing and compelling, but incomplete. Procrastination is an epiphenomenon of motivation, an active area of research which has some models relevant to the study of procrastination, such as: Hyperbolic Discounting Temporal Motivation Theory Rational Choice Theory Expectancy Theory Perry emphasizes task importance as the ...


6

I think it is often a myth that people work better under pressure. Most people who say they work better under pressure have not really tried working under normal conditions. Even if a person thinks he works better under pressure, he may work better under normal conditions. That being said, pressure (more specifically time pressure) helps in providing closure ...


5

I'm having a difficult time finding anything on suppression aside from various bits on the white bears experiment you noted. Of particular note is this study, I suppress, therefore I smoke detailing how suppression can help with immediate control. But, when they stopped suppressing a large rebound effect occurred. This would indicate that the five-second ...


5

The answer to this question could be found in the mind-wandering literature (see this for a review). Figure 1 in the paper really nicely depicts the possible situations possible when looking at task engagement and self-generated thought. I'll summarize them here: You are engaged in the task, i.e. attention is focused outwards, and the stimuli you perceive ...


4

No. An association between overweight and procrastination appears to have no direct empirical support to speak of. The most direct evidence I can find on the matter was a study into industrial workplace productivity's association with overweight, which found a very small (approximately 1%) loss in productivity over other workers associated with moderate or ...


3

Procrastination is deep and complex subject and its not "Hey you are just lazy man" thing. People procrastinate for wide variety of reasons here are few ideas: Procrastination can be a symptom of deeper inner meaning problems or mindset problems. Procrastination can be due to fear of failure, fear of success (!) Procrastination can be due to be overwhelmed ...


2

No. A person may claim to be procrastinating without putting any real thought into specific alternatives that are known to be better. For example, one might also claim this because one is aware of more socially desirable alternatives, which aren't necessarily better, or because one has been told by someone else (who isn't necessarily right) that one's ...


2

Present subjects with a long-form writing task about anything - most likely, you'd be best-off supplying a topic that's difficult to write about (self-analysis, distant dates, self-assumed tardiness, etc) and not fun to think about. Don't set a time limit or a word limit, and stress that it's important they answer fully, completely, and honestly. If you want ...


1

I found this 2018 meta-analysis of 24 studies by Wendelienvan & Klingsieck on procrastination intervention - Educational Research Review article. They used Steel's 2007 definition of procrastination as an irrational and acratic behavior. Procrastination is a voluntary delay an intended course of action despite expecting to be worse off for the delay. ...


1

The question is unclear. It does not properly list the symptoms. This is because back then I did not know what to look for. The symptoms I was observing were actually effects of stress/anxiety. Naturally, the students get more stressed when they are studying alone. Fortunately, I have been able to correctly match all the symptoms with one disorder: Self-...


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