9

Robin Kramer gave a good starting point in his comment. As he said, the difference between laziness and avolition primarily come from the causes of each behavior. Laziness is common among psychologically "normal" individuals while avolition is commonly seen in patients with schizophrenia or depression. Now I will go in depth with each to better characterize ...


5

I'm having a difficult time finding anything on suppression aside from various bits on the white bears experiment you noted. Of particular note is this study, I suppress, therefore I smoke detailing how suppression can help with immediate control. But, when they stopped suppressing a large rebound effect occurred. This would indicate that the five-second ...


3

I'm not sure what you mean to ask here, but there is a recent (2016) meta-analysis by Vadillio, Gold and Osman just on the topic of glucose and willpower. Abstract: The idea behind ego depletion is that willpower draws on a limited mental resource, so that engaging in an act of self-control impairs self-control in subsequent tasks. To present ego ...


2

Supposing that by "laziness" you just mean behaviours etc. apparently identical to avolition, then the difference is, assuming we call "avolition" a symptom of an illness, that avolition is out of the control of the sufferer, unlike laziness. That's if we do agree that illness is out of a sufferers control, at least more so than their other behaviours. ...


2

There was a study that was published in 2009, which focused on food and self-control. This study, revealed that self-control didn’t have much of an effect one way or another on whether or not the volunteers were able to constrain themselves from eating the presented food (in this case, chips) In addition, professor and health psychologist Traci L Mann Ph.D. ...


1

I don't know of evaluations of those types of techniques. To broaden your query slightly, there is strong evidence from social psychology that increasing helpful behaviors and decreasing unhelpful behaviors is more about context than willpower (e.g., see how Nisbett & Ross talk about the power of the situation for behavior: http://faculty.babson.edu/...


1

I would argue that they are not the same, but you are correct that there could be some overlap. I think you will also find that people in different schools of thought might prefer a particular term for philosophical reasons in some situations, and in others the terms are more clearly distinct. I would say that volition involves conscious decisions to do ...


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