8

As mentioned in Can calmness happen during the fight-flight response?, with looking at the possibility of calmness during stress and trauma, you only have to look at the situation with rape victims and soldiers witnessing severe traumatic events who dissociate (Ellert, et al. 2011)(Waller, et al. 2001) during the event. Dissociation is a psychological ...


5

Short answer: Not a debugger, but possibly a control flow override. Long answer: This is a common fallacy known as the introspection illusion: The introspection illusion is a cognitive bias in which people wrongly think they have direct insight into the origins of their mental states. ... In certain situations, this illusion leads people to make ...


5

I'm having a difficult time finding anything on suppression aside from various bits on the white bears experiment you noted. Of particular note is this study, I suppress, therefore I smoke detailing how suppression can help with immediate control. But, when they stopped suppressing a large rebound effect occurred. This would indicate that the five-second ...


4

The term for this phenomenon is "lucid dreaming". It is common to have some lucid dreaming experiences, but different people have different occurrence rates of lucid vs non-lucid dreams, and the level of "control" varies as well. A previous SE Q&A addresses some of the possible influences on lucid dreaming including the potential to learn to have more ...


4

Is there a term for that? The closest term I can think of relevant to psychology is the Freudian concept of reaction formation the classic example being the gay homophobe


4

[Just addressing your title question:] supposedly so, but there isn't a lot of data on this. One of David Buss' students has this in his PhD thesis: participants from the Austin community completed a survey instrument that asked a series of questions about their most memorable fantasy of killing someone else. Seventy-six percent of women and 91 ...


3

Some types of meditation (when successful) can bring about states that can certainly be used for debugging purposes. One of the key factors is the ability to relax enough while maintaining sufficient focus to be able (a) to see why you are thinking or reacting in a certain way and (b) to stop immediately in your thinking tracks and choose a different path. ...


3

This may not be a perfect answer to your question but it should be of help. Essentially, I think that research on personality suggests that self control (and thus a lack of impulsivity) may be part of the reason why introverts don't engage in extraverted behavior. According to personality research on arousal [1], levels of extroversion and introversion are ...


3

[H]ow does one reliably reach this state "on-demand" and how does one maintain it during the endurance of significant nociceptive pain? It seems that activating the gamma wave on-demand is the key to withstand the pain. But how? No one knows. From Koch, The Brain of the Buddha, American Scientific, 2013: Gamma activity in these monks is the largest ...


2

Along with many others, Google Scholar came up with the following articles for me American Association for the Advancement of Sciencetalks about the relationship between health and a sense of control old age National Academy of SciencesExperimental and economic studies suggest large-scale programs aimed at self-control to improve citizens' health could reap ...


2

Alas there's not much in the way of interventions that can curb impulsivity on the spot. Quoting from a somewhat dated but widely cited review, Moeller et al., 2001: Of the operant therapies used in treating individuals with impulsive-related disorders, contingency management procedures have received the most clinical and research attention. ...


2

According to the article "Brief meditation training induces smoking reduction" one kind of mediation-training reduced smoking by 60% while a control group (relaxation training) showed no such effect. "Integrative body-mind training (IBMT) is a form of mindfulness meditation that involves body relaxation, mental imagery, and mindfulness training accompanied ...


2

Several years ago, I was unsuccessfully searching for a study that evaluates the efficacy of many different interventions in the context of addictions. However, I did find a cognitive behavioral therapy (Copeland et al. 2001) that included a mindfulness technique called urge surfing and it was compared to other CBT interventions in cannabis use disorders. A ...


2

So basically the question eventually became about the influences of on-line activities on changing (improving in this case) one's behavior if not downright one's personality in real life. There is a body of evidence that this is not uncommon, especially with children, adolescents and young adults. It's not an incredibly well research topic, so I'll mention ...


2

This is not really a scientific term, but it instantly reminds me of keeping up appearances: To pretend that everything is good, for example with your marriage or your financial situation, even though you are having problems. Their marriage was over, but they wanted to keep up appearances for the children.


2

What you describes may refer to bad faith: Some examples of bad faith include: a company representative who negotiates with union workers while having no intent of compromising; a prosecutor who argues a legal position that he knows to be false; an insurer who uses language and reasoning which are deliberately misleading in order to deny a claim. In ...


2

Re-reading the whole quote and not just the first 3 sentences there does seem to be some ramblings which need citations to back his claims. The crux of your question: I am puzzled [with] what he means by [the] word reveal above? why would you not want to reveal (whatever he means) yourself? The first 3 sentences loosely refer to the concept of the ...


1

I don't know of evaluations of those types of techniques. To broaden your query slightly, there is strong evidence from social psychology that increasing helpful behaviors and decreasing unhelpful behaviors is more about context than willpower (e.g., see how Nisbett & Ross talk about the power of the situation for behavior: http://faculty.babson.edu/...


1

Generally this is known as rumination. I don't know if there has been a more specific name for the specific type you mention, but it has been studied somewhat: Certain characteristics of rumination, such as compulsion to continue ruminating, occurrence of unproductive thoughts, and "why" and "what if" type questions, as well as negative emotions before ...


1

This is a very interesting question. I think that there are many both conscious and unconscious factors that determine destructive behavior. The conflict between the id and super-ego (mediated by ego) can, at some level, be understood as a conflict between needs and social norms. Murder seems to be universally accepted as "bad behavior" so it must be coded ...


1

There's a recent negative study: Bergwerff et al. (2016) "No Tryptophan, Tyrosine and Phenylalanine Abnormalities in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder": This study is the first to explore AAA metabolism in children with ADHD using a well-defined and relatively large sample. We found that AAA deficiencies are not related to ADHD. The ...


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