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I am a Artificial Intelligence researcher with a interest in neuroscience.

I was wondering if flow diagrams exist of the way information flows from sensory inputs through the parts of the brain (and their function) to form output actuation signals for moving the body?

This kind of flow diagram might be used as a kind of blue print for constructing intelligent systems.

Such diagrams of information flow of other animals besides humans (less complex systems) would also be very welcome and useful.

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    $\begingroup$ The short answer is that (at the very least) rudimentary versions of such diagrams do exist for both human and other animals. $\endgroup$ – Azorce Jul 14 '15 at 14:24
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    $\begingroup$ I voted to close this question as it has potentially hundreds, perhaps thousands of possible answers - any information flow may be applicable. For example the visual dorsal and ventral streams have not shown up in the answers, but are both notable examples of the flow of info in the brain. This question is too broad. A google (scholar / image) search will quickly and easily yield a massive amount of data. $\endgroup$ – AliceD Aug 14 '15 at 5:33
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    $\begingroup$ @AliceD I would agree, and would not object to closing this. A suitable answer which could be accepted would basically clarify that. Another potential good search is anything in 'artificial general intelligence (AGI)', which largely sets out to accomplish that. $\endgroup$ – Steven Jeuris Jan 7 at 18:18
  • $\begingroup$ @StevenJeuris given the number of upvotes I tend to leave it up. After all, we should represent the community, right? Closing questions years post hoc is always tricky. I already voted rather late (a month after posting), but to close it now.... Up 2U though. $\endgroup$ – AliceD Jan 7 at 19:04
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Most flow diagrams with the detail your require are for rudimentary sensory functions (such as seeing, eye tracking and other simple functions) can be found in any neuroanatomy textbook. The one I have experience with is "Neuroanatomy: Text and Atlas" by John H. Martin.

Alternatively, if you're looking for a more functional interpretation of how information flows through the brain in terms of behaviour, the most detailed model that I know is Spaun. A diagram of the brain model taken from the Science paper can be seen below:

enter image description here

Other models using the Neural Engineering Framework and the Semantic Pointer Architecture used in Spaun may also have the types of diagrams you are looking for. For example, consider this motor control diagram from Travis DeWolf's PhD thesis on Adaptive Control.

enter image description here

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I have found the human information processing model (Wickens) to be a good starting point at understanding the high-level processing functions that take place.

Human Information Processing Model

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  • $\begingroup$ I am looking more for a model which indicates flow between functional parts of the brain and their function rather then a conceptual one. But thanks for the reply. $\endgroup$ – Fiorentino Jul 22 '15 at 16:11
  • $\begingroup$ Understood, and I suspect with how little we know about how the brain works, what you are looking for doesn't exist, at least not a complete map from end to end. The sensory input piece is pretty well mapped, but they get stuck after that in figuring out how the brain processes signals. $\endgroup$ – rmayer06 Jul 23 '15 at 11:07
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There's also Hickok and Poeppel's Dual Stream Model of Speech/Language Processing.

http://www.talkingbrains.org/2008/12/dual-stream-model-of-speechlanguage.html

Hickok and Poeppel's Dual Stream Model of Speech/Language Processing

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  • $\begingroup$ Some details on how this was discovered (especially how they distinguished bi-directional vs. unidirectional paths) would be appreciated. $\endgroup$ – Seanny123 Aug 14 '15 at 11:59
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    $\begingroup$ They use data from neuroimaging studies (fMRI, PET) and lesion studies (patient has damage to certain area of brain, see what functions are disrupted). Maybe other sources, too. Can't remember. I can't speak to the bi/unidirectionality of all the connections, but the bidirectionality between the phonological network and the lexical interface, for example, is suggested by phenomena like the ganong effect. $\endgroup$ – Russell Richie Sep 2 '15 at 1:59

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