Artem Kaznatcheev
  • Member for 9 years, 10 months
  • Last seen more than a month ago
4 answers
70 votes
6k views
What makes people easily subscribe to pseudoscientific theories?
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66 votes

There are two great TED talks that together help shed some light on your question: David Deutsch (2005) "A new way to explain explanation", and Richard Dawkins (2009) "Why the universe seems so ...

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5 answers
45 votes
53k views
Why would the brain flip the images perceived by your eyes?
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46 votes

It is not meaningful to talk about your brain processing something as 'right-side up"' or 'upside-down'. The 'images' in your brain are just collections of neural activations, and not actual ...

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4 answers
28 votes
20k views
Is pedophilia a sexual orientation or a mental disorder?
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28 votes

Before trying to give any sort of answer, it is important to address a common misconception. In popular culture, the terms child-molester and pedophile are often equated. Scientifically, they are not ...

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3 answers
27 votes
4k views
What are some of the drawbacks to probabilistic models of cognition?
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22 votes

Probabilistic approaches of this sort are usually referred to more specifically as the bayesian approach and Chater and Tanenbaum are definitely bayesians (I have not read much by Yuille and can't ...

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2 answers
24 votes
3k views
Subconscious vs Unconscious
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20 votes

The confusion originates from Sigmund Freud who initialized the field with his idea of the unconscious mind. Freud was of course Austrian, and used the terms das Unbewusste and das Vorbewusste. These ...

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2 answers
7 votes
615 views
Neural Microfilaments for Computation?
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16 votes

I think Keegan provides a great set of references, but I just wanted to expand on his answer in a little bit more detail. Penrose and Hameroff's ideas are mentioned a lot on the internet and although ...

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1 answers
19 votes
680 views
Is there a region of cortex which over a period of development becomes the seat of self?
16 votes

Modern homunculus arguments don't assert that there is physically a little man in your head. This would be a completely vacuous argument, and nobody would make it in the present day. When people make ...

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2 answers
29 votes
3k views
What is an effective metric of complexity for an Artificial Neural Network?
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15 votes

The standard complexity metric in theoretical computer science and machine learning, in particular in statistical learning theory, is the Vapnik–Chervonenkis (VC) dimension. It is of interest because ...

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2 answers
7 votes
2k views
Where is the visual "image" that we "see" finally assembled?
15 votes

I think you are succumbing to the homunculus argument, the fallacy that there is some sort of image in the brain for someone to view. There is no magical theater in your head where what is incident on ...

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1 answers
10 votes
1k views
Are there sex differences in inter-rater consistency of attractiveness ratings of opposite-sex faces?
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14 votes

There is a very large literature on this, and it features many subtle points, but I will try to summarize some general themes. In general, subjects are very consistent at ranking pictures of others ...

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3 answers
8 votes
2k views
Are colors real?
13 votes

Usually, for something to be 'real', we want it in some reasonable manner to be objective or (because that is extremely vague) at least very consistent across subjective observers. Unfortunately, ...

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3 answers
18 votes
998 views
Is it possible for certain people to perceive colors differently?
13 votes

As @Gray mentioned, the philosophical problem you are interested in is known as the inverted spectrum. Unfortunately, @Gray's claim about no empirical difference is not exactly true. As @...

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2 answers
3 votes
1k views
Do people like those who are similar to them and why?
13 votes

Since you mentioned that you want an evolutionary explanation, there is one available. In biology the effect of providing benefit towards potential non-kin based on an arbitrary marker is known as the ...

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1 answers
14 votes
477 views
How does neural spiking begin in the fetus?
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11 votes

Many parts of the fetus brain begin showing neural activity before the senses that feed them are sufficiently developed to provide actual sensory information. In other words, it is unlikely that ...

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1 answers
11 votes
6k views
What does "veridicality" mean in terms of psychology?
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11 votes

Veridicality is a term used in cognitive science; it is the degree to which your internal representation of the world accurately reflects the external world. Some background Since the work on Humberto ...

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2 answers
20 votes
2k views
What are popular rationalist responses to Tversky & Shafir?
11 votes

@OfriRaviv provided a great answer, but I thought I'd add a third alternative I am aware of for completeness. The Tversky & Shafir result is only a violation of classical probability. This ...

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2 answers
10 votes
282 views
How to computationally model the Wisconsin Card Sorting task?
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10 votes

Dehaene & Changeux (1991) made a neural-network model: The coding units are clusters of neurons organized in layers, or assemblies. A sensonmotor loop enables the network to sort the input ...

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2 answers
22 votes
2k views
What tasks does Bayesian decision-making model poorly?
10 votes

@CHCH has provided a good broad overview, but I thought I would also append some specific experiments that are considered to be a weakness of Bayesian models. The whole theme of this answer is an ...

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1 answers
11 votes
603 views
To what extent are correlations of father's age with birth defects and autism causal?
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10 votes

This is a partial answer suggesting a possible causal mechanism. One of the factors leading to birth defects and autism is mutations in the parent's genetic material. In a recently published article, ...

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2 answers
8 votes
167 views
What is the name of a test presenting words in different colors?
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10 votes

This is an experiment testing the Stroop effect, named after John Ridley Stroop who studied it in 1935, and often called a Stroop experiment. It is a classic and well understood experiment and has now ...

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1 answers
7 votes
4k views
What is the difference between IQ and Executive Function?
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10 votes

As I mentioned in my comment: IQ is a measurement that is believed to correlate with certain aspects of 'intelligence'. Executive function is "an umbrella term for cognitive processes such as ...

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4 answers
33 votes
3k views
What are good examples of applying dynamical systems in cognitive science?
9 votes

I have a similar background to you, and have found a lot of interesting things in evolutionary game theory (you can follow links from my profile for more). But on the specific content of your question:...

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3 answers
12 votes
9k views
What areas of mathematics support the study of cognitive science?
9 votes

I will deviate from the other answers and give more pessimistic response based on my experience as a mathematician and theoretical computer scientist that spends some of his time in a psychology ...

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3 answers
16 votes
1k views
Research suggesting conscious control over brain region activation?
9 votes

Not only can brain activation be controlled though consciousness (which is expected under most reductionist accounts of the mind-brain problem) and measured in the lab (as @Jeff's answer showed) but ...

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1 answers
5 votes
475 views
Physiological differences between brains of Conservatives and Liberals
9 votes

The easiest way to work forward from a well-cited article is to do a forward Google Search. My answer is almost completely based on such a search and concentrates on three brain regions: amygdala, ...

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1 answers
3 votes
140 views
What introductory material is available linking complexity theory to cognitive science?
8 votes

In general, there are two types of 'complexity' that are studied. Usually, when people talk about 'complexity', especially on the internet, they mean Santa Fe Institute style complexity. This is a ...

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2 answers
11 votes
1k views
Is it possible to quantify cognitive bias?
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8 votes

If you come to this question from the bayesian tradition, then there is only one place where you can sneak in bias: your prior. This dovetails nicely with the wikipedia definition: a pattern of ...

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4 answers
14 votes
7k views
Running on autopilot
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8 votes

What you describe is the textbook definition of a habit: routines of behavior that are repeated regularly and tend to occur subconsciously. These are triggered by some external (say, being behind the ...

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3 answers
16 votes
858 views
What are the key examples of the use of computational methods in the study of biological neural networks?
8 votes

The use of neural-networks in the cognitive sciences has been around since Turing. However, many of the networks common in connectionism suffer from a lack of biological plausibility. Of these ...

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1 answers
-1 votes
386 views
What kinds of math to learn for understanding dynamic systems in cognitive science?
7 votes

Unfortunately, in psychology and cognitive sciences (and some parts of neuroscience) absolutely no mathematical training is given beyond the highschool level (intro stats, basics of linear algebra in $...

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