Always Confused
  • Member for 5 years, 3 months
  • Last seen more than a week ago
  • Kolkata, West Bengal, India
Is there a neutral term for people who tend to avoid face-to-face or video/audio communication?
5 votes

The description strongly matches with Autism, Autism spectrum disorder and Asperger syndrome. See also: Asperger syndrome Autism spectrum condition Autism Classically, Asperger syndrome was ...

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how to train our brain to always use left part for thinking & deciding things?
4 votes

Unfortunately this question is based on a false premise. Thanks for asking. The oversimplified view on brain lateralisation is so stubbornly persistant and it invaded so many meditation guides, self ...

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Can an autistic person have very advance language skills?
2 votes

Yes, this may happen with Asperger subtype of autism. AS had already been described in 1981 by Lorna Wing, who first proposed the term to refer to a special subgroup of children who, according to ...

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What is this stratagem called when someone talks to you like you're a slow-witted kid?
2 votes

it is sometimes called as infantilization, which is common towards children as well for some people with impaired social communication, so apparently considered as childish people. Infantilizing is ...

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Is leg jiggling a focus aid?
1 votes

Seems to be a form of stimming and stereotypy. Stimming helps in calming and concentrating. Everybody stims to some extent but it is more common to people having neurodevelopmental condition. As you ...

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Is multitasking a myth?
1 votes

I think we all multitask to some extent which is not just task switching. Such as while watching a movie, we watch the visual scene (containing multiple objects) , listen to the soundtrack (music + ...

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What do you call this fear response?
1 votes

The linked Youtube Video is unavailable but looking at the videos linked by @Fizz it looks like it is a Fawn response. It is one kind of fear response where the stressed individual chooses to be ...

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What makes it necessary to define autism beyond perceptual dysfunction?
1 votes

There are several other aspects that I think are not just "perceptions" but something more complicated. Having an weak or a different theory of mind; that hinders processing in general how ...

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What do psychologists call the ability to quickly revise and remember things that a person had previously learnt
Accepted answer
1 votes

Looks like when your friend was freshly learning the equations, he was using more of his episodic memory but as he went "used-to" with the equations, he tapped into more of semantic memory. ...

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How to distinguish mental illness and neurodevelopmental disorders?
1 votes

As @BryanKrause said; mental illness and neurodevelopmental conditions are not distinctively separable. Example: Neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia, Obsessions and compulsions in Asperger ...

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Is stacking cans really a sign of Asperger's?
1 votes

Autism is usually a range or spectrum of co-morbid symptoms that greatly vary from one autistic individual to another. As an only common characteristic we may say that autism is a disability in social ...

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Is it possible to develop dementia by eating bone marrow?
1 votes

Prions are sort of protein with such a distorted conformation that convert its benign/ essential form into prion forms. Thus they can multiply which is comparable to reproduction in virus and viroids. ...

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Does everyone have some degree of Aspergers?
1 votes

No. Everyone is not a little bit autistic. Everyone may not be "typically developing" in some or some aspect; but autism is not universal. Apparently Same symptoms or same behaviour may have ...

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What is the relationship between mathematical ability and autism?
1 votes

It can range from savant-like skills to extreme dyscalculia, some are very mean or average. The savant stereotype is caused mostly by many Western films which is applicable only for a small fraction ...

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Do people with ADD or Asperger's Syndrome often show different learning curves than neurotypical individuals?
0 votes

I could not find any research about learning as function of time in TD and ASD population but there are some research about learning curve as a function of number of trials. According to the article ...

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Is an autistic person's brain different from a non-autistic one?
0 votes

To be more specific, are there any differences in brain structure or brain activity, that can be used to distinguish between autistic and non-autistic person by analysing their brain structure and ...

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What's the psychological basis for "Look at me when I'm talking to you"?
0 votes

"typically developing" people (those who are not in the autism spectrum) needs eye contact itself as a signal of communication as well as they observe gaze, facial expression, and other body ...

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Are the incidents of autism spectrum disorder on the rise, or is there an increase due to better definition of diagnostic criteria?
0 votes

What seems most intuitively to me; people did not knew about autism. With time, the awareness and diagnosis increased. Many of us know weird people who often stay alone, have communication problems, ...

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Why does autism sometimes only visibly appear later in life?
0 votes

More of an opinion based answer- the symptoms become more distinguishable from kids and adolescent behaviour when you age. Restless behaviour, stimming behaviour, echolalia etc. can be confusing with ...

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Why Do People Feel "Safe & Secure" with Their Emotional Distress?
0 votes

You are right, and consolation often backfires. this is for 2 reasons. We as human beings, want to be witnessed, heared. Few year ago a video based on research work of Megan Devine went viral over ...

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How to distinguish introvert personality, social anxiety disorder and mild autism?
0 votes

The 3 said conditions look very similar, but their meaning is different. but they indicate different parameters or different directions. Overlap can happen, such as an "introvert autistic" ...

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Are brain sub-divisions based off embryonic development used when describing mature brains?
0 votes

For school or college level biology class these hierarchical classification schemes (based on devbio) are still sometimes used and it helps me greatly to conceptualise the brain structure and basic ...

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What practical dysfunctionality characterizes severe autism?
-1 votes

Autism is an extremely broad and multidimensional set of difficulties. 2 severely autistic person does not necessarily have the exactly same set of difficulties. There are various psychometric tests ...

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