StrongBad
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Differential equations in psychology
8 votes

The Hodgkin and Huxley model of neuronal firing is based on non-linear differential equations. A significant portion of research on sensation and perception is based on such models.

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How to use a QUEST staircase in 2-AFC?
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7 votes

There is a lot going on in your question. QUEST, as well as many other adaptive procedures, is well suited for a task like estimating morph distance in a 2-AFC paradigm. There are, however, a couple ...

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What are the temporal limits of the auditory system?
6 votes

In terms of the shortest stimuli, the auditory system can process acoustic impulses, but defining the duration of an impulse is problematic. As the duration of the impulse gets shorter, the bandwidth ...

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aftereffects of auditory adaptation
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6 votes

The most well known sensory after effect illusion in the auditory system is probably the Zwicker tone (Zwicker, 1964). If a white noise with a half‐octave‐band suppression placed anywhere from 300 ...

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What does "non-linear processing" mean, exactly?
5 votes

The idea of linear/non-linear in neuroscience is the same as in mathematics. A process $f(x)$ is linear if $f(\alpha x) = \alpha f(x)$ and $f(x+y) = f(x)+f(y)$ for all $x$, $y$, and $\alpha$.

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Applying signal detection theory to single-stimulus presentations
5 votes

There are a huge number of paradigms that SDT can be applied to. The simplest is probably the so-called yes/no paradigm. You present a single stimulus (typically noise alone or signal plus noise) and ...

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How similar are the brains of twins?
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5 votes

Biondi et al. (1998) compared MR images of monozygotic twins and found that while the brains of monozygotic twins are not identical, they are similar. Relevant for understanding the concordance rate ...

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Which is the shortest duration for a pitch difference in audio signals to be perceived by the human auditory system?
5 votes

It really depends on what you mean by difference in pitch. Subjects can discriminate differences in frequency for very short tones, but it does not mean they are being perceived as pitch differences. ...

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Is it possible to calculate d prime if no catch trials were done?
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4 votes

In order to estimate d' for a particular signal level, we need an estimate of the hit rate at that signal level and an estimate of the false alarm (FA) rate. Typically, the FA rate is estimated from ...

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Two different values for criterion in signal detection theory?
4 votes

For these types of questions I really like Detection Theory: A User's Guide by Macmillan and Creelman. They consider 3 types of bias. The criterion location $c$ is calculated relative to the zero-bias ...

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Calculating d-prime
4 votes

The index of sensitivity $d'$ is typically defined in terms of two equal variance normally distributed random variables with means $\mu_s$ and $\mu_n$ and standard deviation $\sigma$: $$d'=\frac{\...

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Is this Auditory Processing Delay?
4 votes

Research into auditory processing deficits is a minefield and there is no real consensus as to what is and is not a deficit in auditory processing. Further, and possibly more relevant for individuals ...

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Have ideas of "gamification" been applied to education?
4 votes

Malone and Lepper (1987) is often cited as the seminal paper regarding gamification for education. They started off by identifying factors which affect computer game preferences and then identified ...

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How does the brain compute sound localisation without the equations?
4 votes

The location of a sound is defined on three dimensions: distance, elevation, and azimuth. When the distance between a listener and a sound source is changed there is a change in the overall level as ...

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What hardware setup is commonly used for low-latency audio stimulation?
Accepted answer
4 votes

It generally helps to provide some sort of specification as to how well you want to control the timing. There are 4 orders of magnitude difference between the 100 ms timing accuracy required for ...

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Simulating Hudgkin Huxley neural network
3 votes

I am old and my experience with this area is 20 years out of date, but I would still go with https://neuron.yale.edu/neuron/

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How to pursue a Psychology career in academia from non-Psychology background?
3 votes

Psychology is a very broad field. While some subfields require a license (e.g., clinical psychology), a huge number of undergraduate fields can prepare you for academic related work, teaching and ...

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Amount of noise in (the recognisable definition of) an ERP
3 votes

Averaging does not perfectly remove the noise. Assuming the signal is perfectly correlated across repetitions/sweeps/trials and the noise is independent, than doing from 1 to 2 sweeps will increase ...

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How many items in a list can a human create without repetition?
3 votes

Recalling items from short term memory is a very different task from creating a list of all unique items. There are a number of strategies for recalling items from short term memory without repeating, ...

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Double blindedness in a fully remote trial
3 votes

If the investigator knows what group the subject is in and then has any interaction with the subject, it is not double blind since the investigator can, potentially unintentionally, influence the ...

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How long does a spiking signal last?
Accepted answer
3 votes

Many of the neurons in the auditory system have voltage-gated low threshold potassium channels which allow neurons to maintain high firing rates and high temporal acuity. This makes the auditory ...

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Two possibilites to increase the effect of binaural beats
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3 votes

Both of your proposed methods to increase the measureable affect of binaural beats on the brain would introduce a monaural beat. For example, sweeping the volume from left to right means the volume in ...

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What is the effect of Binaural Beats on an Autistic brain?
3 votes

The evidence in support of binaural beats as a therapeutic tool is sketchy: Is there scientific evidence on the benefits of binaural beats? Given our lack of understanding of if binaural beats can ...

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Long term effect of using noise generators
3 votes

There is some cool evidence (e.g., Canlon et al. 1988) that low level noise exposure can actually protect you against high level noise exposure. That said, I am not sure that one should constantly ...

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How do certain frequencies of sound induce psychological states?
3 votes

Auditory information is conveyed to the brain from the cochlea via the VIII cranial nerve (aka vestibulocochlear nerve). Under standard conditions the vestibular system gets activated when we move our ...

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How is tone volume encoded?
3 votes

Siebert (1968) modelled level discrimination based on the information in the firing rate of auditory nerve fibers. The model does a reasonable job over a narrow range of conditions, but misses a large ...

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Reference request in Circuit and Signals for Computational Neuroscience
3 votes

Signals and System by Oppenheim (and others) was developed while he was teaching 6.003 at MIT. Similarly Foundations of Analog and Digital Electronic Circuits by Agarwal (and others) was developed ...

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Can our auditory perception be used to trick our visual perception?
3 votes

I don't buy it the claim made in the quote. The speed of sound is roughly 1 foot per millsecond so even if you take a large 3 foot step you are changing the audio visual onset asynchrony by only 3 ms. ...

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Why does your recorded or objective voice sound different to what you hear in your own head?
3 votes

There are two sound pathways by which we hear: bone conduction and air conduction. The air conduction pathway involves vibrations in the air being transmitted from the ear drum, through the bones of ...

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If 10 words are presented at the same time, is it still considered a 'free recall' test?
2 votes

Memory recall is generally tested with one of three paradigms: serial, cued, and free. In serial recall the subject must recall the items in a specified order (e.g., forward or backwards). In cued ...

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