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As Bryan Krause indicates in the comments, the statement that 'One third of the cortical surface is dedicated to vision processing' is disputable. Especially given that fact that there's evidence that even the primary visual cortex is involved in multimodal processing (MacPherson, 2018). Nonetheless, it is a valuable statement as it makes clear that a lot of ...


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Short answer Ambiguous figures do not necessarily depend on focus, they do depend on attention though. Background The figure you provide is huge. From a standard face-to-monitor distance of a meter or so, one indeed needs to scan the image. Under these conditions I agree with you, in that the perceived animal changes when you change focus. The ears become a ...


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Here’s an image I found that triggers tristable perception (as opposed to just bistable perception): The three possible interpretations are A big cube with a smaller cube in front of it A big cube with a small cubical chunk missing A room with a small cube sitting in the corner Apparently there is a fourth possible interpretation, but it is so “unlikely” ...


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The primary visual cortex is topographic, which means that specific parts of that brain region correspond exactly to specific parts of your visual field. In order to prove that a scotoma (literally a blind spot in your vision) is due to dysfunctional neurons, all you need to do is show that the neurons responsible for that spot in your vision are not working ...


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20-30% vision. See Sheth & Young (2016) which cites Van Essen (2003). 27% vision, 8% auditory (Van Essen, 2003) I have seen some earlier references that say 50%. I think this derives from two factors. First, it is 50% in Macaque (see above ref 1). Second, my feeling (I haven't dug into this in enough detail to conclusively state it, so please don't ...


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A newborn baby has difficulty focusing its eyes or telling the difference between two objects presented to it. A baby learns to recognise its mothers face within the first week after birth, long before it can recognise objects that are not faces. They already show a preference for face-like visual stimuli while in the womb. The Human Fetus ...


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