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20

Several factors are proven to affect our experience of time. Those that differ from one day to the next include: Biochemistry affects our perception of time. Stimulants produce overestimates of time duration, whereas depressants and anesthetics produce underestimates of time duration. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_perception Fear affects our ...


14

Preface This is a very interesting question, that is also somewhat related to my area of research. I know of several related results (which I might add later in an edit), and I thought that with a few minutes of scholar search I'll find a paper dealing with this question exactly. I was surprised to find no such papers. So I decided to conduct an experiment.....


9

Part of the difficulty in studying time perception is that memory is known to be biased by numerous factors including arousal and salience. So while people commonly report time slowing down during specific events, it is difficult to differentiate the effects of retroactive memory bias in encoding and recall from actual increased resolution in the perception ...


9

Short Answer Yes. People estimate time differently, by focusing their attention on time in more or lesser degree. Also within a person, time estimation may vary due to stochastic variations. Long answer This is a really nice paper that tries to explain time-perception in a cognitive architecture called ACT-R. It is a model of human cognition that tries ...


7

The answer depends of course on the factors mentioned in the comments; however, one important factor to consider is the intended purpose of reading the clock. An analog clock presents information in graphical form, in a similar way to how a pie chart might present information. This is opposed to a digital clock, which presents symbolic information, in a ...


5

It seems that there is a research literature on the topic of the relationship between body temperature and time perception. Weardon and Penon-Voak (1995) present a literature review of the topic which would be worth reading if this interests you. The following quotes their abstract: Experiments investigating timing behaviour in humans under conditions ...


5

There's definitely scientific evidence that one's perception of time can be influenced by actions which in no way something's duration. It's not quite the happy/sad affect you're asking about, but it definitely suggests that one's perception of time can be meaningfully influenced by wholly unrelated information: 2010 Study: When doctors sit for patient ...


4

To extend on @BenCole comment, an interesting summary of different models of time perceptions can be found in this paper. These models are in a sense more descriptive than the fundamental biological hypothesis mentioned by caseyr547, so you might not be ready to call these "explanations", depending on what you mean by that. The models attempt to give a ...


4

If someone is familiar with repeating a task, it becomes a habit. Routines within a habit take less brain power. With less conscious effort needed to do it, someone would most likely underestimate or gloss over what the task consists of. This is just one possible interpretation; there might be other reasons as well. The evolutionary advantage would be ...


3

People who are entitled tend to have a slower perception of time. In any given situation, a person can feel some level of entitlement. If a person is waiting in line for 10 minutes to check out groceries, he would experience that 10 minutes as passing by very slowly. On the other hand, if that same person was waiting 10 minutes to meet the President, he ...


3

There is some evidence of a moderate correlation between response times (on very simple tasks) and intelligence constructs like IQ. Here are two relevant papers and their abstracts: Deary, Der, & Ford (2001) The association between reaction times and psychometric intelligence test scores is a major plank of the information-processing approach to mental ...


2

There are several mechanisms for time perception that depend on the task performed (counting, judging prospectively, retrospectively) as well as on the duration of the interval to be judged (duration perception for 1s intervals works differently from 1minute or 1 year). Overall the idea you advance of multiple mechanisms is well accepted. This is just a link ...


2

I'd say yes, in german literature there are some reportings of athelets "training" in slow motion while they are lucid dreaming. I'll try to recap those reportings in english. Paul Tholey & Kaleb Utecht cite Sadko Günter Solinski, an equestrian, in "Schöpferisch Träumen" (p.257-258): Als Reiter kann ich somit im Klartraum (A) meine ...


2

The synchronization of sensory information is called multisensory integration: Multisensory integration, also known as multimodal integration, is the study of how information from the different sensory modalities (such as sight, sound, touch, smell, self-motion, and taste) may be integrated by the nervous system. This is the most salient example of ...


2

Short answer The brain actively integrates and synchronizes sensory inputs, up to the point that it actually delays one modality to match it with another. Background Your question is all about intersensory asynchrony and sensory integration. A well-known example where the two stimulus modalities you mention in your question (light and sound) are perceived ...


1

A true philosophical zombie would form the same memories of being conscious that a conscious human would. By definition, a p-zombie is atom-for-atom identical to a real person, and would be impossible to distinguish by any means, even through the memories stored in the zombie's brain! If consciousness was one day imbued into a 30-year-old philosophical ...


1

This is a tricky topic and my answer will be clearly speculative. I will say that this is also largely a matter about metaphysical allowances and involves personal identity implications. Assuming that time travel is physically possible, we need to make assumptions around how time is interpreted within the time travel journey. Scenario 1: Time travel based ...


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