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6

In general, theories of self-regulation, emotion regulation, psychoeducation, and many forms of therapy posit that, in one way or another, awareness of your emotions or thought patterns is largely adaptive. This is true because self-awareness facilitates self-regulation (broadly speaking). For example, being able to identify the emotion you're ...


6

I think what you're talking about is worry and/or rumination, both of which describe a perseverative and repetitive thinking style (e.g., Watkins, 2008). Worry is future-oriented whereas rumination is past-oriented. We don't understand the mechanisms all that well at the level of analysis you're interested in, but I'll present some brain-level theories/data ...


5

There are many areas of the brain that are associated with planning complex behavior. This is because planning and executing are mediated by the brain's capacity for executive functioning, and EF is further associated with many areas of the brain -- in this case, the the frontal lobes, the prefrontal cortex, the caudate nucleus, and the putamen all seem to ...


5

From a quick search online I see no reason why you distantiate what you describe from auditory hallucinations: a form of hallucination that involves perceiving sounds without auditory stimulus. Given the article you link to, which arguably does address your question (yes, some people report experiencing this), you mainly seem to be concerned that this ...


5

Short answer Sensations are different from thoughts and are separated in the spatial and temporal domain. The distinction between thoughts and perceptions, however, is less well defined, but can still be dealt with experimentally. Background A description of sensation is as follows: The physical process during which our sensory organs [...] respond to ...


4

My initial thought when reading this question is that it would an extremely difficult thing to pin down whether or not depression would affect memory in the long term this is due to a variety of confounding factors but the one that strikes me as most prominent is that major depression rarely goes untreated for a long period of time, in a population of people ...


3

Animal brains, especially mammals', are quite similar to humans. So far, attempts to define what makes human cognition "different" in some way have been for the most part a failure - the goal posts continue to be pushed. What seems to remain is a suggestion that human brains are especially socially-focused, and that humans have a uniquely developed ability ...


3

While not a formal scientific research, I built an app to track just the kinds of things you are talking about. You can see my notes here: http://luciddreamingapp.com/better-mood-tracker/tracking-bad-stuff-part-5/ Here's an example (horizontal scale is 24 hour time, icons have personal significance, for example sleep, games, walk, negative thoughts): I've ...


3

First, I think you'll find that most cognitive scientists do not believe in free will. It definitely is relevant to your question, because if you believe in free will, then you basically don't believe that our thoughts have causes. Second, you'll be interested, I think, in the idea of spreading activation. Models based on spreading activation capture the ...


2

Well, let's considering what you're asking here. You're asking if people who code think differently. Well, let's consider those who know how to program. Some people plan what they are going to do, while others take a more dynamic approach. Some people create a 'skeleton' of what they are about to build before they fill in the missing pieces (and will debug ...


2

Although I cannot answer the question on lying, (self-)speech and thinking are intimately linked to each-other, and actually used in UX-design (e.g. Krahmer, 2004). He compared two different approaches of thinking-aloud. In other words, people are perfectly able to verbalize their thoughts and actually do so. One of the approaches he compares is a proposal ...


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Thomas Metzinger wrote a few interesting articles about this, he calls it Mental autonomy. (here's an open access article) The myth of cognitive agency: subpersonal thinking as a cyclically recurring loss of mental autonomy. Front Psychol. 2013; 4: 931.


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There are many things at work here. A lot of your sensitivity to human voice can be attributed to the tonotopic organization of the basilar membrane. Check out this image of the cochlea and notice how its sensitivity to different frequencies does not decrease linearly over space https://media1.britannica.com/eb-media/98/14298-004-99934987.jpg , this entails ...


2

I suspect we adopt irrational positions when we have an implicit choice available and our frame of mind, owing to biological factors such as stress hormone levels, favors rapid choices over thoughtful reflection on the circumstances we face. Dual process theory provides a decent framework for thinking about this. There is a remarkable body of literature ...


1

As pointed out in the comments, there are many different questions in your post, and it lacks a clear focus and structure, plus you introduce many assumptions that I think are incorrect (e.g., the definition of real is not "what we can perceive through our senses"). Having said that, and to cut to the chase, the answer is: yes, our thoughts are real. You ...


1

Here are some reasons I collected that can explain why we have wrong ideas: Naïve realism Egocentrism Illusion of transparency Self-conscious emotions


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Short answer In normally sighted people visual thinking is the dominant mode of thinking and may be intimately associated even with verbal thinking and hence difficult to root out completely. Background Human thought can be generally divided into visual and verbal thinking. Visual thinking is mediated by visual imagery, where imagery visual ...


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Another classic distinction was given by Bargh in 1997 that helps show muddling (lack of clear overlap) between the dual-systems concept and how the unconscious is defined by psychologists: Unconscious cognition is more likely to be one or more: outside awareness, not intended, relatively fast, and difficult to control. http://psycnet.apa.org/record/...


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Peter Carruthers argues (2014) that system 1 doesn't quite overlap with unconscious thinking: I shall argue that there is, indeed, a real, scientifically valid, distinction between a set of intuitive, unconsciously operating reasoning systems, on the one hand, and a reflective system whose operations are partly conscious, on the other. But I shall ...


1

There's a serious science of the theoretical limits of representation / information processing in CS, in complexity theory & computability theory. You can pull some of that stuff across to cognitive science, the question 'what level of the complexity hierarchy does language sit at' has a decent track record of productivity, it's not totally crazy to ask ...


1

Hence, my question: Is there any scientific evidence that support that the cell assembly is the basis of thought/a concept? This paper Thinking in circuits reviews this matter in detail, and its references can provide more related scientific evidence. Question: What is the neurophysiology of a thought? I think the following papers can provide some current ...


1

Most people (including myself) do not hear or speak with inner voices, but it is not unheard of, see Hearing Voices Network. Ego State theory is a theory of multiple personality facets (ego states). In their book "Ego States: Theory and Therapy", John G. and Helen H. Watkins transcribe several hypnosis sessions, where they communicate with different ego ...


1

Allow us to include within the term "learning" the absorption of information, which contributes to creation of neural pathways within the brain. Admittedly, this is a rather liberal use of the term, "learning". Human thought is an emergent behavior of the brain, which begins once sufficient neural pathways have formed. Therefore, we "learn" before we think, ...


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The basic idea of Quinian Boostrapping is that you start off not understanding a concept, but use a symbolic placeholder for it, and then fill in the details over time. For example, right now you don't understand Quinian Bootstrapping but you do have the placeholder term "Quinian Bootstrapping" that you can hold in your mind and relate to other things you ...


1

All actions a person might take are ultimately a matter of using one's muscles. So in that sense, your question -- What happens the moment the person starts to act based on a thought? Where in the human brain does a thought trigger action? --probably ought to point us most to the motor cortex, since this area in the brain is most directly responsible for ...


1

It is my belief that liars inclined to lie to them selves. Freudian psychology can illustrate this point through the concept of the ego-sensor. Liars can be compelled to lie to themselves in order to protect the ego. Thereby, preserving their sense of identity. This usually occurs in the form of denial, detachment, or reattribution. I do not believe that ...


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