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I think the key concept to tackle this question is to consider the concept of abstraction. Abstract models are generalized models of some kind "reality" that we are interested in, with the aim to describe some behavior of the system in question reasonably well. Often the abstraction should also be relevant to many instances of the entity that we would like ...


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Taking @BenCole's suggestion on the bolded parts... how the human mind creates and perpetuates the idea of knowing something I think the philosophic response to this is "What does it mean to know something?". I'd recommend Searle's Chinese Room argument [1] and the many rebuttals to it (which include some computational explanations of understanding) to ...


5

For a review of how this question is debated in Cognitive Science, search for Searle's Chinese Room Thought Experiment. In the Chinese Room Thought Experiment, Searle argues there is something fundamentally meaningful (semantic-holding-preserving) about the internal state of a living being. Additionally, this meaning cannot be approximated by a computer. ...


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The question title reads: Does the split brain disprove a materialistic mind? The simple answer being no, nothing disproves that - the brain harbors the mind e.g., (Lilienfeld & Arkowitz, 2008). Now you mention that two hypotheses on split-brain patients are false, namely... Both [hemispheres] gain their own conscious mind. Only one [hemisphere] has ...


4

Humans have a natural ability to predict the behavior of others called folk psychology: ... folk psychology, or commonsense psychology, is a human capacity to explain and predict the behavior and mental state of other people. ... Traditionally, the study of folk psychology has focused on how everyday people—those without formal training in the ...


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Dr. Sagan is referring to the brain's ability to produce models of the world in order to test predictions. In terms of psychology contemporary with Carl Sagan, he may have been referring to, in part, the theory of schemas. This is a general representation of a thing or idea that is used in classifying or identifying the thing or idea. In developmental ...


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Yes, depending on what "mind" means. A common folk perception of the "mind" is that there is some sort of operator within the brain, a unified conscious homunculus. Instead, cognitive neuroscience informs us that the mind is a network of faculties — one of which is consciousness. Most other faculties, such as memory, perception, use of language, etc., aren'...


4

Theory of mind doesn't really "presuppose" a mind. Theory of mind is just a name for a particular cognitive capacity: the ability to know that you have a mental state and to realize that others have a mental state, and that their mental state is not the same of yours. Calling this ability "theory of mind" might be a bit confusing because it sounds like it's ...


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Probably because it was defined as: An individual has a theory of mind if he imputes mental states to himself and others. [...] In this paper we speculate about the possibility that the chimpanzee may have a "theory of mind," one not markedly different from our own. In saying that an individual has a theory of mind, we mean that the individual ...


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Quoting from "Cognitive Reflection and Decision Making" Many researchers have emphasized the distinction between two types of cognitive processes: those executed quickly with little conscious deliberation and those that are slower and more reflective (Epstein, 1994; Sloman, 1996; Chaiken and Trope, 1999; Kahneman and Frederick, 2002). Stanovich and ...


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The final two paragraphs of that piece address this exact question. Although understanding how neurons communicate with each other contributes to our understanding of behaviour at the level of biology, behaviour cannot be reduced to biological explanations. In conclusion, the communication of neurons within the nervous system assists our understanding of ...


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This question is quite broad, firstly, because these tests measure different (though interrelated) cognitive faculties and at different developmental stages and secondly because there is a lot to say for each sensory impairment. However, it touches on quite interesting topics for which there have been many studies and I think a summary of the findings can be ...


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Well, the areas most responsible for social cognition (or theory of mind) appear to be the right and left temporoparietal junctions, the right anterior superior temporal sulcus, the posterior cingulate, and the medial prefrontal cortex. [1][2] Of those, the right TPJ is perhaps the most important; for example, the response in the rTPJ shows a peak just at ...


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I do have a question though, once you have an awakening, and realize as others have said, that you are in the matrix, aren't you aware of this fact forever? So how can you be not enlightened anymore, but you once were. Question by tristo in a comment to my previous answer I'm not sure about the matrix analogy because in the movie they simply replace '...


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Well, let's considering what you're asking here. You're asking if people who code think differently. Well, let's consider those who know how to program. Some people plan what they are going to do, while others take a more dynamic approach. Some people create a 'skeleton' of what they are about to build before they fill in the missing pieces (and will debug ...


2

it seems to me that a meaningful existence requires the absence of cognitive dissonances, but I wonder what science would have to say about this, and if there is any empirical basis for claiming this. The difficulty, as you've pointed out, is that there isn't agreement on the definition of "meaning" in this context. Meaning can be interpreted by ...


2

If “the mind” in your question means a non-material entity that exists in an animal and that can sense signals from the environment (see, hear, smell, etc.), operate the signals, resulting in various mental activities (thinking, solving problem, planning, remembering, recalling, etc.), and send signals to its effectors (hand, legs, lips, etc.) to respond to ...


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Some scientists will say that a fear of heights (and spiders, snakes, and the dark) are innate, i.e. that we are born with them because they confer an evolutionary advantage. In other words, a fear of heights tends to prevent falls, and a fear of snakes tends to prevent snake bites. We tend to have little control regarding when these fears arise. However, ...


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There are many reasons why people tend to understand things in dualistic ways, but I'll mention two: In the realm of inference (e.g., judging what is true, forming predictions), having mature schema for each end of a spectrum (e.g., one for introverts and one for extroverts) allows you to infer what positions between the two extremes might look like with ...


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I will attempt to answer your question. However, I will not be able to provide a neurological explanation of the mechanisms of this pattern. First off, apparently such a thing does exist. In cognitive and behavioural psychology fields, such a pattern has been studied extensively by many researchers ever since. One example of a theory that addresses this ...


1

I suspect that the reason he considers it unmotivated is that he would like to see a theory that can explain the hard problem(s) of consciousness. In that final paragraph where he argues that the theory is unmotivated, he points out that (in his opinion) IIT seems to do nothing to explain why there is something it is like to be conscious from a subjective ...


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The denial of mind is called Eliminative Materialism or "Illusionism": Eliminative materialism is the claim that people's common-sense understanding of the mind (or folk psychology) is false and that certain classes of mental states that most people believe in do not exist. ... modern physicists are eliminativist about the existence of ...


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CBM is not so much a theoretical framework but rather a label attached to a collection of methods and biases. In a way, this reflects the state of research on heuristics and biases, at least in behavioral economics. As many famed findings in the field have come from attempts to "disprove" traditional economic theory, the resulting effects (biases) have often ...


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I was just wondering how realistic this video was: youtube.com/watch?v=Bsyplaii9p4 – tristo I find the presenter's style very long-winded but I understand precisely what he is talking about. The phrase that struck me most was when he said "... when the psyche dissolves ... what is left is the truth itself". This mirrors my own experience precisely. My own ...


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I can speak from personal experience. I have been on an enlightenment intensive. I could give a very detailed description of the progression I went through. However it is quite impossible to explain the state of 'knowing' that one achieves. In normal life we experience the world through sensation and we have beliefs about what we haven't sensed. The sense ...


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As @what wrote, the state of our knowledge on Mind reading is low but it is an on-going research. The current research uses EEG and MRI techniques to retro-engineer (read and decipher) our thoughts and actions: see the Introduction To Modern Brain-Computer Interface Design linked to the EEGLAB software, or the Brain computer interface wikipedia page (http://...


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My idea was similar to what "what" said; however, instead of the reader needing to be trained to the thoughts of other people and/or having to clone humans with these genes, the OP could have it to where the post-apocalyptic world in which the book is set in features humans that have evolved into what they are now, with having these receptors in their skin ...


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