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From Hubbard & Ramachandran (2005): [...] the estimated prevalence of synesthesia has varied dramatically, between as many as 1 in 20 (Galton, 1883) and as few as 1 in 25,000 (Cytowic, 1989). The most widely cited study to date suggests that synesthesia occurs in at least 1 in 2000 people (Baron-Cohen et al., 1996), although this is now generally ...


7

After a fair amount of research, I came across Noam Sagiv, PhD, a professor at the Centre for Cognition and Neuroimaging who has done research into synesthesia, including visual-gustatory synesthesia (the proper term for seeing-tasting synesthesia). I contacted him about this and he said the following (reproduced with permission): I can understand your ...


6

The wikipedia Article on Synesthesia cites some prevalence studies Random population studies ... determined that 1 in 23 individuals have some kind of synesthesia, while 1 in 90 have colored graphemes (Simmer et al 2006). Colored days of the week and colored graphemes are the most common types(Simmer et al 2006; Campen, 1999). References Simner J, ...


6

Unfortunately, it appears there is currently no research investigating how synaesthetes experience the binaural beats effect. If any such research does exist, it does not appear to be available (in English) via Google Scholar, Web of Science or Scopus. Furthermore, there is little research on binaural beats generally. I covered some of the scarce research ...


6

You can induce weak/artificial synesthesia on yourself, you cannot induce strong synesthesia on yourself. The type of synesthesia you describe is the same type that Ramachandran mentions when hypothesizing that synesthesia is not a legitimate sensory experience: "Could we be absolutely sure that this wasn't happening because early in kindergarten she had ...


6

Generally spoken, synesthesia is unidirectional. For example, grapheme–color synesthesia (i.e., letter–color and digit–color synesthesia) is the most prevalent type of synesthesia. The presentation of a grapheme leads to an additional synesthetic color percept. Although grapheme–color synesthetes are strongly influenced by the synesthetic color perception ...


5

Psychology and physiology are at different levels of explanation or levels of analysis. The answer depends entirely on how you view the relationship between such levels and in particular (mental) causality within and between levels. As this is still heavily debated, this metaphysical consideration is a precursor for giving a more specific answer to your ...


4

You ask "if there is a more mundane explanation" and note that you're "not looking for a diagnosis." As you'd expect of course, it seems sensible to conclude that indeed no definitive judgement can be made about the cause of your experiences without some sort of professional assessment. And there are methods available to attempt to make such a determination....


3

Nick's answer links to the very interesting geometrical discussion by the authors, but they leave out some background. The color after-image phenomena is best described by opponent-process theory. The basic idea is that the neural systems representing color have a competitive nature. So the system that codes for red and green is the same system and cannot ...


3

Very cool image! As for your question, your link includes a link to the authors' poster, which allows you to "read more about the illusion and possible explanations." From the poster: In conclusion, the observations so far suggest that the afterimage effect is not due to higher level effects of shape-specific coloured afterimages but rather to a rapid ...


3

To whatever extent colorblindness is a consequence of sensation loss, perceptual loss should necessarily follow. If colorblindness results from diabetes solely due to retinal damage, this means diabetes prevents these two colors from causing different sensory stimulation. If the sensory stimulation is truly the same, it should be perceived the same. A signal ...


2

Short answer No. Background The definition of synesthesia is generally as follows: ... a perceptual condition of mixed sensations: a stimulus in one sensory modality (e.g., hearing) involuntarily elicits a sensation/experience in another modality (e.g. vision). Likewise, perception of a form (e.g., a letter) may induce an unusual perception in the same ...


2

Can synesthesia make a person feel "new" color (or any other experience)? The answer may be yes. You can find this quote “V. S. Ramachandran and E. M. Hubbard (in their 2001 PRSL paper) described a partially colorblind man with letter-color synesthesia who said that when synesthetically stimulated, he saw colors he had never seen with his eyes—he called ...


1

My problem with explaining the illusion in terms of complementary colours using the opponent process theory is that the two alternating colours, red and blue, in the illusion aren't actually complementary, at least not according to the colour chart in Keegan's answer where red complements green and blue complements yellow. The theory might well account for ...


1

I think the only documented case of this is Neil Harbisson. From my understanding he has a camera attached to an implanted bone vibrator and a processor unit that converts color to audible frequencies. I believe, although cannot find any references, that the implanted portion of the device is similar to a bone anchored hearing aid.


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