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13 votes
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Why do people who stutter have less difficulty singing than speaking?

Short answer Singing increases the duration of voiced intervals in stutterers. Background Singing is an example of one of the most effective methods to decrease stuttering* (Stager, 2003). It is a so-...
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12 votes

How do we hear our inner voice?

No, inner speech does not follow the same neural pathway as speech coming in from outside. Rather, inner speech uses the same neural mechanism as outer speech - that is, speech going out. The neural ...
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8 votes
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What are proper EEG frequency bands and electrode placements for imagined speech?

A study by D’Zmura et al. (2009) in which two syllables were spoken in imagination showed that imagined speech information was present in EEG alpha, beta and theta bands. The beta band (13-18 Hz) ...
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6 votes
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Do people "subvocalize" during thinking or "internal monologue"?

Short answer Sub-vocalization can also be detected during cognitive demanding tasks other than reading. Background As far as I can see, most literature acknowledges sub-vocalizing as being only ...
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6 votes
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What is the meaning of Trump's 'thumb-and-index-pinch' when he speaks?

Short answer The 'OK pinch' (Fig. 1) expresses precision and control. It stresses particular phrases and shows commitment to his words. Background In an interview with Psychology professor Geoffrey ...
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6 votes
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How do congenitally deaf and mute people think?

Short answer The inner voice of congenitally (pre-lingually) deaf people who have not received treatment like cochlear implantation, is not sound-based. Instead, it is mainly based on visual images, ...
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5 votes
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How does speed listening work?

Your question made me think of JAWS, a screen reader for the blind. I have worked with visually impaired people for a while and I have always wondered how on earth they can understand the speech ...
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4 votes
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What is the difference (in a recording) between speech and a sound? What makes the difference to the brain?

Speech is sound and the brain will recognise the sound as speech. As for the possibility of creating the sound of speech without recordings using sound waveforms I would say that is off topic here and ...
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4 votes
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Why does paraphrasing result in failure to obtain the spacing effect?

Short answer Paraphrasing indeed negates the spacing effect observed in learning, because it causes mass repetition to be as effective as spaced repetition. The confusion is that paraphrasing does not ...
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4 votes

How does speed listening work?

There is probably not a large difference from what occurs during normal listening--and that is likely why speed listening is effective: a. The reason it "feels" normal is the same that any other ...
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4 votes
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Can one reasonably guess the gender of a person from their writing/speech contents?

While you are probably better to ask your question over at the AI Stack Exchange for more practical answers on how to accomplish the task, I would also suggest you could take a look into the topics on ...
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  • 409
3 votes

Can an autistic person have very advance language skills?

As an Autistic person myself, and as a person knowing many autistic people, I can assure you we indeed are capable of language. Even very low functioning autistic individuals are at least somewhat ...
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3 votes
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Can an autistic person have very advance language skills?

They may be referring to hyperlexia (rather than hyperverbal ability): Hyperlexic children are characterized by word-reading ability well above what would be expected given their age. ... Some ...
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3 votes

How to counteract the deterioration of speech in stutterers by targeting sympathetic arousal?

The first line treatment for stuttering (I'm a stutterer myself) is speech therapy. Such therapies generally focus on helping stutterers to learn ways to minimize stuttering when they speak, such as ...
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3 votes
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Why do we say, "Oh!" when we are surprised?

This is a hard question because there are probably many different (but not equally valid) answers. From my perspective (Barrett & Russell, 2015), there are a couple of things to think about. How ...
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3 votes

Is speech perceived as set of phonemes by human?

Phonemes are the smallest units of speech sound, usually about 20 to 60 in number, and different for each language (1). They are what letter are to words, actually alphabetic writing systems are ...
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3 votes
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What are the different theories about how the brain processes speech?

This question is quite broad and since it seems to be basically a reference request, I will suffice by giving some prominent theories of speech perception with sources and references. Speech ...
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2 votes

Are liars inclined to lie to themselves?

Although I cannot answer the question on lying, (self-)speech and thinking are intimately linked to each-other, and actually used in UX-design (e.g. Krahmer, 2004). He compared two different ...
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2 votes
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Impaired verbal communication, but normal reading and writing skills?

Just a reminder that Stack Exchange is not an appropriate place to get a diagnosis; a vague description of symptoms may indicate a variety of possible outcomes. See a doctor instead. That said: One ...
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2 votes

What are the different theories about how the brain processes speech?

Factors to be considered in speech processing: Serial versus parallel processing (ie, whether processes are carried out sequentially or processes occur simultaneously). Ascending vs. descending ...
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  • 1,039
2 votes

Can an autistic person have very advance language skills?

Yes, this may happen with Asperger subtype of autism. AS had already been described in 1981 by Lorna Wing, who first proposed the term to refer to a special subgroup of children who, according to ...
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1 vote

how does our brain know how to provide the right instructions to pronounce words?

Children experiment and practice. They produce sounds and then listen to their own sounds as well as those produced by others around them. Part of this experiment and practice is the stage of language ...
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  • 5,817
1 vote

What is the difference (in a recording) between speech and a sound? What makes the difference to the brain?

While speech is certainly sound, the brain will not always recognize speech sounds as speech. This is clear when one constructs speech from just sine waves as it reveals how the brain goes about ...
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  • 11
1 vote

How do deaf people get feedback on their speech?

Many "deaf" individuals still have some functional hearing. Even in the case of a total loss of hearing, there are proprioceptive cues that provide useful feedback for speech production. The typical ...
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  • 2,617
1 vote

Why do people talk (or communicate)?

We evolved from animals which live in groups. Social animals such as chimpanzees (our closest relatives) communicate to one another to warn of danger, call for help, express emotions, etc. In a ...
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1 vote

Can speech dysarthria occur in schizophrenia without other neurological or medication-induced disruptions?

There's one somewhat obscure paper by Varambally et al. (2012) that (apparently) says that dysarthria can be a part of the "Neurological Soft Signs" (NSS) of schizophrenia itself. They examined "32 ...
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  • 9,915
1 vote

Why do people who stutter have less difficulty singing than speaking?

Another explanation for this is that the centers for speech and singing, respectively, are located in different parts of the brain. People with speech impediments, and even severe brain damage from ...
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1 vote

Are liars inclined to lie to themselves?

It is my belief that liars inclined to lie to them selves. Freudian psychology can illustrate this point through the concept of the ego-sensor. Liars can be compelled to lie to themselves in order to ...
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