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Your question made me think of JAWS, a screen reader for the blind. I have worked with visually impaired people for a while and I have always wondered how on earth they can understand the speech produced by JAWS given the sheer high speech rates they apply on their gadgets. Indeed, people with peripheral vision loss may learn to understand spoken language ...


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There is probably not a large difference from what occurs during normal listening--and that is likely why speed listening is effective: a. The reason it "feels" normal is the same that any other sensory stimuli feel normal after a while: your brain habituates to the patterns of your sensory experience. If you increased the pitch of the podcast without ...


3

The Wikipedia article on relevance references a couple of books and a few journal articles. The Wikipedia article says Cognitive science and pragmatics Further information: Relevance theory In 1986, Dan Sperber and Deirdre Wilson drew attention to the central importance of relevance decisions in reasoning and communication. They proposed an ...


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Just a reminder that Stack Exchange is not an appropriate place to get a diagnosis; a vague description of symptoms may indicate a variety of possible outcomes. See a doctor instead. That said: One general term for disorders that affect some language modalities and not others, when the cause is psychological rather than physical (ie, not deafness, muscle ...


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Factors to be considered in speech processing: Serial versus parallel processing (ie, whether processes are carried out sequentially or processes occur simultaneously). Ascending vs. descending processes (representations about basic or fundamental characteristics or parameters of the (Vs, representations of related characteristics). Automatic vs. ...


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This question is quite broad and since it seems to be basically a reference request, I will suffice by giving some prominent theories of speech perception with sources and references. Speech perception theories are grouped into two: Passive (or non-mediated) theories. These theories mostly focus on finding the identity of certain constant perceptual cues ...


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We evolved from animals which live in groups. Social animals such as chimpanzees (our closest relatives) communicate to one another to warn of danger, call for help, express emotions, etc. In a broader sense, there are advantages to living in groups: Mutual defense, stronger attacks on prey, ability to share resources... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


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The ability to understand speech at increased voice rates is all about learning. A notable example in this regard is the use of text-to-speech software like Jaws used by blind folks unable to read the written word. Jaws is able to convert text on screen into the spoken word using a speech generator. After people get used to read on-screen content through ...


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There does not seem to be any research on your exact question on: the effect of "low attention tasks" and "high attention tasks" on the comprehension and memory of speech modality learning. However, if we widen the scope of the question to different modalities of learning like reading, then there is ample research. However, most of the research seems to ...


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