7

There is serious work on this, despite it being a political minefield. You're probably looking for Lewandowsky, et al. (2015). If you want to get some distance from the issues of the day (and associated name calling) and into the mechanisms that drive this sort of phenomenon in general you might get more joy out of something like Cook & Lewandowsky (...


7

I agree with @AlwaysConfused that this sounds very like someone with Asperger's. However, if you want a more "neutral" term, would Introvert help? Such a person - an Ixxx on the Myers-Briggs scale - typically finds their "energy levels" drain when in groups of people, and recharge when they are on their own.


6

Searching the first three pages of "personality gender egalitarianism" on Google Scholar, I found five studies on this topic. All of them support the view finding of increased gender differences in more egalitarian countries, and I didn't find any that were against. [Edit: added a Falk 2018 as noted in a comment.] Most of the studies analyze the Big Five ...


5

The description strongly matches with Autism, Autism spectrum disorder and Asperger syndrome. See also: Asperger syndrome Autism spectrum condition Autism Classically, Asperger syndrome was characterised by no obvious delay in language development, and in some cases Aspergers tend to have a very vast vocabulary. I did not understand what is meant ...


4

I hope I am qualified to answer this question. I am not a psychologist but have worked with transgender persons in volunteering positions a number of times and am fairly well researched on the topic. The biggest key point as I have studied simply is based on health outcomes as opposed to comparing this to mental illness. This page talks about the practical ...


3

The reason for failure to thrive other than insufficient nutrition, can be suppressed growth hormone secretion due to emotional neglect. In the following example, both the emotional neglect and insufficient nutrition were combined, though: Psychosocially stunted growth masked as growth hormone deficiency, (Klinische Pediatrie, 1999): Short stature is a ...


3

I'm not aware of any special technical term for such a phenomenon, though colloquially the youngest child may sometimes be called "the baby of the family". Furthermore, I'm not aware of this phenomenon existing outside of family dynamics - it might be just your personal experience. In the workplace for example, the youngest members of a team may be treated ...


3

The two problems might seem to be equivalent but they aren't - in the "John" scenario those advocating not to arrest John and harvest his delicious organs are pointing out that: that John should decide whether to sacrifice for the benefit of the other patients. This is showing that the problems aren't equivalent because John has a choice to sacrifice ...


3

I can see where the confusion may lay as the disciplines are very similar but different in their own ways. Social Psychology is about understanding individual behavior in a social context (McLeod, 2007). This field of psychology therefore looks at human behaviour as influenced by other people along with the social context in which this occurs. McLeod ...


3

TL;DR: Multiple approaches have been tried over many years. Current medical evidence strongly supports an "affirming approach" to alleviate gender dysphoria. "Corrective approaches" are considered unethical, and withholding treatment is not considered neutral. It's explained in the referenced AAP slides, e.g.: Children rejected and not supported are at ...


3

You can think of "abnormal" in two basic ways: Statistical abnormality - The extent to which an individual is high or low on some trait compared to the average of the population. This use of the term is value-neutral, meaning that there is nothing inherently good or bad about being close to the average (i.e., "normal") or far from the average (i.e., "...


3

The short answer is that anyone who gives you a short answer should be treated with suspicion. ;-p The StackExchange was founded in 2008, and has seen a lot of changes since that time. That has provided the science community with little time to study the phenomenon in much detail. As such, there are many many theories, but little consensus, and no ...


3

A historical example of what you describe is the 14-17th centuries "dancing manias" where hundred of people would start dancing to exhaustion for no apparent reasons. Sometimes causing death. There are many case studies of mass psychogenic illness, you'll find examples in the wikipedia page of this topic. Note that this is typically the default diagnostic: ...


2

Plutchik's model is certainly visually appealing; however, the two dimensions of the model have no neurological or biological basis. The Atlas of Personality, Emotion and Behaviour (Mobbs, 2020) is an alternative with an established neurobiological basis. The atlas catalogues over 3,000 emotions which include vigilance. Alternative emotions would include: ...


2

The relationship between implicit bias and individual behaviour is not direct and does not satisfactorily explain biased behaviour on an individual basis. There are two studies that looked at cardiovascular disease, which does propose some interesting hypotheses. These studies add to the growing evidence that bias whether implicit or explicit is ...


2

My point I find that it is fair to say men benefit from casual sex encounters more than women. Evidence In the Penguin publication the "Red Queen" by Matt Ridley, he writes: Throughout our evolutionary history, men and women have faced different sexual opportunities and constraints. For a man casual sex with a stranger carried only a small risk - ...


2

As far as I am aware, there is no such word in the English language as Philia, but it is a suffix within words. Also, the suffix of -philia in a word does not necessarily denote anything sexual. The -philia suffix denotes one of the following (Merriam-Webster, n.d.): friendly feeling toward(as in Francophilia) tendency toward(as in hemophilia) abnormal ...


2

It is a negative/reverse halo effect, aka a horns (or devil) effect.


2

I have found 2 papers that may be relevant to your question - This paper probably answers your question the most - I have only schemed through it, and it seems that the results were insignificant. You can check out the paper in more detail, hopefully it will get you to more resources that can help with your research. I have also found this paper which ...


2

I'll go about this question focusing on the definitions, rather than jumping onto the answer proper. Clarifying definitions may already help you a step closer to an answer. On the other hand, the first id[e]ology [of children] got in their head by their parents. So is that not also brainwashing of a sort? the definition of Brainwashing...: a ...


2

In simple terms, demand for toilet paper increased and supply was unable to scale up. The supply chain for toilet paper is unable to rapidly scale up production to the levels required to meet the large increase in demand. Most supermarkets (at least where I live) seem to be unwilling to increase the prices of toilet paper in order for supply and demand to ...


2

Yes, there's a lot of work on this! Still a ton of open questions though, and plenty of smart people working in quite disconnected paradigms. A classic study in this space is Heider F. & Simmel M. (1944). An Experimental Study of Apparent Behavior, The American Journal of Psychology, 57 (2) 243. DOI: 10.2307/1416950 But note the date! 1944! I think ...


2

Short answer The Stack Exchange model is based on gamification. Gamified environments typically deploy incremental rewards that tap into the brain's reward system, making these applications addictive, in a quite literal sense. In addition, reputation increases come with incremental gain of moderator abilities, which give a sense of power. Background I ...


2

One critique of the Dunning-Kruger effect is that it is just regression to the mean. I.e., there is an imperfect correlation between perceived an actual ability. A consequence of this is that people low in ability will overestimate and people high in ability will underestimate. Of course, in some domains, we also see a leniency bias whereby people in general ...


1

Interestingly, the authors appear to have been aware of your concern: Given that the only difference between these groups involved a subject variable for which there could be preexisting differences in DTA, we included a third group of creationists who read a nonthreatening essay. Since the evolutionist/anti-creation and creationist/control groups ...


1

Questionnaires and measurement scales typically take a lot of revision and validation. Otherwise, it is very common that you measure things you don't intend to measure, are missing relevant options, or omit critical factors entirely. I'd recommend some piloting and to use existing and validated measures whenever possible. Some of your items sound ...


1

This is a good question which cannot really be provided with scientifically proven reasons, so we can only look at possibilities. From personal experience as a therapist, anecdotally I can say that with some people, the meme would not be complete. With these people the situation would be I didn't think I would get this far so quickly and that could be ...


1

I don't know about Gupta & Mishra as I cannot find the paper you are referring to, but Allport & Ross (1967) on page 436 (page 5 of the pdf) points out that the full Religious Orientation scale has been deposited with the American Documentation Institute. You need to: Order Document No. 9268 from ADI Auxiliary Publications Project, ...


1

What you seem to be talking about here are cultural influences affecting your judgement on what is right and wrong to say and do in certain situations. Ecologies shape cultures, and cultures influence the development of personalities (Triandis & Suh, 2002). The conceptualization of culture is by no means a simple matter. One possible way to think ...


1

I have some ideas about your first example. During my course of social psychology a learned about self/social categorization, two concepts that shape how individuals perceive groups. Here are some quick definitions. Self categorization: the process of seeing oneself as a member of a social group (Smith, Mackie & Claypool, 2014) Social categorization:...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible