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I agree with @AlwaysConfused that this sounds very like someone with Asperger's. However, if you want a more "neutral" term, would Introvert help? Such a person - an Ixxx on the Myers-Briggs scale - typically finds their "energy levels" drain when in groups of people, and recharge when they are on their own.


6

There are a bunch of them! For a great review of many definitions and measures of meaningfulness, see if you can get a copy of A Narrative Evidence Synthesis of Meaningful Work: Progress and Research Agenda. The authors are pretty responsive in my experience and will send you a copy. One thing to keep in mind, though, is that there are a bunch of different ...


5

Marks and Nesse investigated evolutionary causes of anxiety disorders and reported about embarrassment in particular: Social threats evoke responses that promote group acceptance, for example, submission to dominants and to norms of dress, mien, odor, speech, customs, beliefs. This prevents dangerous extrusion from the group. Mild shyness and ...


5

Searching the first three pages of "personality gender egalitarianism" on Google Scholar, I found five studies on this topic. All of them support the view finding of increased gender differences in more egalitarian countries, and I didn't find any that were against. [Edit: added a Falk 2018 as noted in a comment.] Most of the studies analyze the Big Five ...


5

There is serious work on this, despite it being a political minefield. You're probably looking for Lewandowsky, et al. (2015). If you want to get some distance from the issues of the day (and associated name calling) and into the mechanisms that drive this sort of phenomenon in general you might get more joy out of something like Cook & Lewandowsky (...


4

Just because two phenomena (partially!) share brain architecture does not mean they are experientially similar or opposite. There is little understanding of how neuronal activity creates conscious experiences. There is a lot of controversy in taxonomies of emotion because it is not clear what the emotions are or how many there are. Also, note that ...


4

Is there a term for that? The closest term I can think of relevant to psychology is the Freudian concept of reaction formation the classic example being the gay homophobe


4

Freely translated, the author says that... "Doing drugs is fine when performed under the guidance of experts in traditional, ritual contexts. Drugs reduce our perception of what is possible, and they reduce the perception of what we ourselves can achieve. Drugs do this until the two are in balance. This is pleasant. But, it is misleading and far greater joy ...


4

What you are talking about is something psychologists Joseph Luft (1916–2014) and Harrington Ingham (1916–1995) looked at in 1955. They developed a 4-pane window visualisation called the Johari Window (named by combining the first parts of their first names). The model is also denoted as feedback/disclosure model of self-awareness (Luft, J., & Ingham, ...


4

Humans have a natural ability to predict the behavior of others called folk psychology: ... folk psychology, or commonsense psychology, is a human capacity to explain and predict the behavior and mental state of other people. ... Traditionally, the study of folk psychology has focused on how everyday people—those without formal training in the ...


4

Children as young as two to three years old are able to pick up on racial categories and stereotypes, and to infer that others' behavior is driven by race (also gender and other categories). Of course, at that age children are actively exploring causes in the world of all types, so a comment asking about Arabic language does not mean that a child is ...


4

The description strongly matches with Autism, Autism spectrum disorder and Asperger syndrome. See also: Asperger syndrome Autism spectrum condition Autism Classically, Asperger syndrome was characterised by no obvious delay in language development, and in some cases Aspergers tend to have a very vast vocabulary. I did not understand what is meant ...


3

Well, whether something is truly predicted or a post-hoc explanation can be difficult to disentangle in this area. What you're asking for is that dual-process theory predicts the existence of a new type of bias previously unobserved. And that's a tall order because observational psychology has been around for a log time. Probably the area in which I buy ...


3

Do note that he says in the very next paragraph Some people will disagree strongly with this description of how drugs affect the mind. After all, for the past quarter-century we have been told with increasing confidence that drugs are "consciousness- expanding," and that using them enhances creativity. But the evidence suggests that while ...


3

There is a technical report by the Committee on Psychosocial Aspects of Child and Family Health at the American Academy of Pediatrics (Perin et al, 2002) which looks at all the scientific literature concerning homoparental upbringing, and they concluded that: The small and nonrepresentative samples studied and the relatively young age of most of the ...


3

It sounds like a variant on the sandwich technique, which is advocated by some as the preferred way to deliver critical feedback to a person, like a student or employee. The sandwich technique can be defined as: ...offer[ing] a piece of negative feedback “sandwiched" between two positive ones, thus easing the blow of the critique. Note that this ...


3

The article you linked to (Holmes, 2018) is talking about both senarios. The therapist must not be a friend before or during therapy sessions. Dual relationships can interfere with the efficiency of the therapy due to the fact that it can create transference and counter-transference issues. Transference Transference as a psychological concept refers to ...


3

The Truth Effect: Repetition makes statements easier to process relative to new, unrepeated, statements, leading people to believe that the repeated conclusion is more truthful. ... The illusory truth effect plays a significant role in such fields as election campaigns, advertising, news media, and political propaganda. A seminal experiment is ...


3

I hope I am qualified to answer this question. I am not a psychologist but have worked with transgender persons in volunteering positions a number of times and am fairly well researched on the topic. The biggest key point as I have studied simply is based on health outcomes as opposed to comparing this to mental illness. This page talks about the practical ...


3

You can think of "abnormal" in two basic ways: Statistical abnormality - The extent to which an individual is high or low on some trait compared to the average of the population. This use of the term is value-neutral, meaning that there is nothing inherently good or bad about being close to the average (i.e., "normal") or far from the average (i.e., "...


3

I can see where the confusion may lay as the disciplines are very similar but different in their own ways. Social Psychology is about understanding individual behavior in a social context (McLeod, 2007). This field of psychology therefore looks at human behaviour as influenced by other people along with the social context in which this occurs. McLeod ...


2

You may be interested in related research on how unfamiliar environments negatively affect sleep quality. Tamaki, M., Bang, J. W., Watanabe, T., & Sasaki, Y. (2016). Night watch in one brain hemisphere during sleep associated with the first-night effect in humans. Current biology, 26(9), 1190-1194. This research has also received substantial popular ...


2

The relationship between implicit bias and individual behaviour is not direct and does not satisfactorily explain biased behaviour on an individual basis. There are two studies that looked at cardiovascular disease, which does propose some interesting hypotheses. These studies add to the growing evidence that bias whether implicit or explicit is ...


2

I think you're at least in part talking about the false consensus effect/bias the false-consensus effect or false-consensus bias is an attributional type of cognitive bias whereby people tend to overestimate the extent to which their opinions, beliefs, preferences, values, and habits are normal and typical of those of others (i.e., that others also think ...


2

This is not really a scientific term, but it instantly reminds me of keeping up appearances: To pretend that everything is good, for example with your marriage or your financial situation, even though you are having problems. Their marriage was over, but they wanted to keep up appearances for the children.


2

What you describes may refer to bad faith: Some examples of bad faith include: a company representative who negotiates with union workers while having no intent of compromising; a prosecutor who argues a legal position that he knows to be false; an insurer who uses language and reasoning which are deliberately misleading in order to deny a claim. In ...


2

I think the term you are looking for is social norm, peer norm, or social expectation. Distinguish from peer pressure, which is a different phenomena, yet related. Many researchers have shown that teens are more susceptible to peer pressure (which implies the same for peer norms). Both relate to self-esteem, and while mostly mentioned as facilitators, ...


2

I think two close concepts are that of "naïve realism" and the false consensus effect. The basic idea of naive realism is very simple. You believe your beliefs to be true! That seems a bit silly, but we can create a concrete example. Let's say you think President Trump is a great president. You have some reasons for believing it, and you have faith in your ...


2

It is difficult to identify autism definitively in other species, especially since autism encompasses a very diverse group of people who have different experiences. However, because there is so much interest in studying autism, researchers have developed models for autism in model organisms, specifically in mice, which share some of the diagnostic features ...


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