Hot answers tagged

7

Q: Does our consciousness die when we go to sleep or fall into a coma? A: No, neuroscientifically speaking, the consciousness does not die when we are sleeping or are in a coma; it is just in a sleep mode or in a severely depressed mode. This is because the group of neural circuits that function to create consciousness (ref 1, 2, 3) does not die when we are ...


4

I don't think that it is possible to learn new facts while sleeping, but it is certainly possible to reactivate certain memories during sleep and thereby affect the probability of those memories being retained. In one study, participants learned a visuospatial task while smelling an odour. They were better at remembering how to perform the task if they ...


3

I am almost a layman but I got to learn something on the subject. As far as I could understand, what in common can be found in wake/sleep and learning are the brain waves. Neurons exchange signals in form of electrical pulses and the collective frequency of these firing rates are indeed these brain waves. In this article it is pointed out that learning can ...


2

Stumbrys, Erlacher, & Malinowski (2015) found a positive correlation between mindfulness during wakeful states and lucid dreaming during sleep. However, there is no explanation about how the actual processes of meditation and lucid dreaming are related. Stumbrys, T., Erlacher, D., & Malinowski, P. (2015). Meta-Awareness During Day and Night: The ...


2

According to Giulio Tononi,"consciousness is what goes away when you fall into a dreamless sleep,” he explained that "once a person goes into dreamless sleep, there is no experience, no perception of surroundings or the environment; there are no memories of the past or the future or even the present. It is thus at this point that everything disappears, ...


2

Lucid dreaming is a half-way state between normal REM sleep and wakefulness. Lucid dreaming probably has less of a recuperative effect than normal REM sleep. On the other hand, there is usually less sleep inertia when waking from a lucid dream than when waking from a non-lucid dream. The function of REM sleep is still a mystery, so very little is known ...


1

I believe the important⁽¹⁾ point is paradoxical sleep. If you cannot sleep, you should try to defocus your thought, in order to allow neurones to "run freely"⁽²⁾. (1) It has be shown that rats deprived of paradoxical sleep died in 16-54 day. (2) I don't know if this will work, but I've been taught at university that neurons can die from sub or over ...


1

It seems like there is a common idea that dreaming occurs only during REM sleep, but I'm not quite sure why this persists. Scientists interested in sleep and dreaming have known for a long time that dreams occur in both NREM and REM sleep, and there are many papers comparing NREM to REM dreams. Cavallero, C., Cicogna, P., Natale, V., Occhionero, M., & ...


1

“Mixing sleep and study in the same location sends mixed signals to the brain,” Carter wrote in an email. “It does not know which it is supposed to be focusing on. This leads to less effective studying (and) learning, and it makes it harder to fall asleep when you want to.” This may have to do in the context of Pavlovian Conditioning. Pahlov found he ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible