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Your experience with more dream following dream recall can be explained in this paper, Effect of encouragement on dream recall (Halliday, 1992). People experience lighter sleep when they recall dream upon awakening (Shapiro, Goodenough, & Gryler, 1963), Armitage (1992) reported that males had more dream recall in low stress days while females showed the ...


6

Yes it is possible. It is very common for normal individuals to feel like they should remember something, but are then unable to actually recall the contents of that particular memory. This feeling of knowing is called metamemory. This study by Art Shimamura and Larry Squire found that patients with severe anterograde amnesia can produce accurate ...


4

There could be several reasons, I'm sure. One particular explanation that sticks out to me is a concept called 'feature integration theory'. I mention this because the things you say you remember -- what the guy in a video looked like, a time when your spelling was auto-corrected, general mundane details or 'features' -- are in line with this theory. You ...


4

A very famous neurological patient, Henry Molaison (known as H.M. in the literature until his death) had severe anterograde amnesia. I don't believe he remembered the details of his condition, but he knew that he couldn't remember things, and he knew that something was wrong with him. I have never read any solid explanation of how that might work; I have ...


4

Your memory of a dream would be an autobiographical memory, which is a memory system that is based on a combination of episodic memories and semantic memories. Autobiographical memories are memories of events that have happened to you, and thus are often retrieved from a first-person perspective. These are not the same thing as episodic memories, however, as ...


4

Memory in the brain isn't super-well understood, so going to the level of "data-structures" isn't really possible with purely biological models. Not that a purely biolgocial description would be very useful anyways. When people ask how the brain works, they typically don't want to be told "molecule A interacts with molecule B, which triggers molecule C". ...


4

Wilhelm 2013 What is working memory capacity, and how can we measure it? Complex span tasks (Cspan) reading span task (Kane et al. 2004) operation span task The rotation span task (Shah & Miyake 1996, adapted from Kane et al. 2004) Updating tasks (Updating) (e.g., Miyake et al., 2000) The verbal updating task In the numerical updating task the spatial-...


3

I must begin by stressing that while this is an interesting question, it is also very complex (much like memory itself). Similar to other areas of Cognitive Psychology, depending on which expert you ask, you might get different explanations. My background is in prospective memory and cognitive psychology, and this is how I would address this question. I ...


3

Free recall refers to not being given exemplars during the retrieval task. For example, multiple choice would be called recognition here, not recall. The format of the presentation such as simultaneous vs. serial, or format of the recall in terms of ordering or grouping, would not affect the term free recall.


3

The brain structure for memory, association, learning and thinking works more like a network of weighted, linked nodes. in machine learning and related fields, artificial neural networks (ANNs) are computational models inspired by an animal's central nervous systems (in particular the brain) [...] Artificial neural networks are generally presented as ...


3

It really depends on the timing of the stressful event, as well as anticipation. From an evolutionary standpoint, "stress" developed for a reason in the context of heightened arousal, attention, preparation for action, etc. Say you encounter a lion in your backyard: Not only will your sympathetic nervous system be on full speed, but several cortices are also ...


3

I think you're misunderstanding the concept of chunking. If the items are arbitrary with no connection to each other, chunking will do you no good since grouping them is meaningless and thus you're still memorizing the individual items in the groups instead of the groups themselves. This paper from Brady et al. goes into depth about the limits of working ...


3

Recalling items from short term memory is a very different task from creating a list of all unique items. There are a number of strategies for recalling items from short term memory without repeating, you can remember all the items in the list in a random order and all the items you have recalled or you can remember all the items in a fixed order and where ...


3

Work in progress - What is the relationship between the different types of working memory or short-term memory and other types of reasoning abilities (non-working memory reasoning tasks including verbal ability, numerical, spatial, etc.)? Are the different measures of short-term and working memory measuring approximately the same thing? This is a good ...


2

You can read book: Trick of the mind - Derren Brown. Derren Brown is a mentalist and in his book you have very powerfull methods to improve your memory based on natural mental processes. The easiest way for me is to create short story about something, that i want to recall, in the fantasy way - for exemple - i want to remember my list of products to buy ...


2

Your best bet is to start looking on YouTube and the Internet for various memory methods used by card memorizers, magicians, and other stunt people. I have used them extensively, and they work. You can also look on Amazon for books. Tony Buzan, Harry Lorraine, Dominc O'Brien. Also the book Moonwalking with Einstein. Don't believe all the nonsense out ...


2

Short answer Generally, Hodgkin & Huxley-derived models are used to describe the gating characteristics of ion channels and ligand operated receptors. Background Ligand-gated and voltage-operated ion channels do not really perform a memory task. Instead, they channel ions across the cell memnrane and by doing so they can convey information from out ...


2

ACT-R is a complete cognitive model that incorporates Working Memory, Declarative Memory and Procedural Memory, but also incorporates input (visual and auditory) and output (manual) buffers. It is a really interesting model about the human in its entirety but, it is at a high level of abstraction. The paper about memory you want is "REFLECTIONS OF THE ...


2

As far as I know the effectiveness of chunking depends on (1) test speed and (2) amount of practice. At low speed simple techniquest benefit almost everyone a little, even with virtually no practice. Quoting from Dempster and Zinkgraf Recently, in fact, evidence has been found that questions the validity of the assumption that chunking plays a role in ...


2

Memory recall is generally tested with one of three paradigms: serial, cued, and free. In serial recall the subject must recall the items in a specified order (e.g., forward or backwards). In cued recall, the items are usually presented in pairs and the subject is told to recall the matching item to one half of the pair. In free recall, subjects can repeat ...


2

In the TED talk he's making a joke ("memory used to be X, now it's Y!"). Likely referencing the "good ol' days" trope where one talks about how things used to be different when the comedian/speaker/audience was younger, or more specifically the tendency of memory to decrease with age. The "span" of working memory depends on the ...


2

If it is a 30-digit number recited at once and you have to recall the longest range of subsequent digits you can recall in reverse order, it would be better to listen more carefully to the ones at the end, considering that it would much easier to recall a long string of numbers in reverse order from the end as you just heard it in comparison to the ones at ...


1

Working memory has a span length of 7 +- 2 (Miller, 1956) digit. So I will suggest you remember the numbers as a bigger one. E.g if you hear 3, 8, 9, 4 ... you can pair them in 38, 94. This will mean memorizing only two numbers, so you will not "waste" your memory span. This should be the trick, not sure if it works in practice. In theory, it does. ...


1

Disclaimer : this answer isn't backed by any source, aside from personal experience. Edit : found a source https://health-clevelandclinic-org.cdn.ampproject.org/v/s/health.clevelandclinic.org/what-happens-to-your-body-during-the-fight-or-flight-response/amp/?amp_js_v=a6&amp_gsa=1&usqp=mq331AQHKAFQArABIA%3D%3D#aoh=16167791861704&referrer=https%3A%...


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While we don't entirely know how all aspects of working memory operate, experiments show that a subset of cells in the brain exhibit persistent activity during working memory tasks. Here's an example from a review by Curtis & D'Esposito: This is a task in panel (a) where there is a cue presented briefly (marked by "C"), and then the monkey ...


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If you look at overloading from overuse of directed attention then I would say yes, and I would say yes it does lead to fatigue and stress, which is why you need to redress with Attention Restoration Therapy (Kaplan and Kaplan, 1989, & Kaplan, 1985). If we look at an extreme example of stress, PTSD, then I would say yes it affects our cognitive abilities ...


1

I could only find a single instance of learning to leverage a memory. "The Origin of Epistemic Structures and Proto-Representations" by Chandrasekharan and Stewart shows how to include the option to save the current state (by training a neural network to output '1' given the current state input) and input this memory into the state representation of a ...


1

Learning is a very complex process, do not expect to find precise answers like “5 exercises are required to learn a new subject”. There are many factors that affect learning, just to name a few: Your existing knowledge. Your engagement with the subject. How you learn. Deep Vs shallow processing. The complexity of the subject. Your personal characteristics e....


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