7 votes
Accepted

How can someone asleep recognize a very brief sound?

Short answer The auditory system remains active during sleep. Background Filtering of sensory input during sleep is a recognized phenomenon and indeed the senses are typically lulled during sleep. ...
user avatar
  • 19.6k
6 votes
Accepted

Does synesthesia lack symmetry?

Generally spoken, synesthesia is unidirectional. For example, grapheme–color synesthesia (i.e., letter–color and digit–color synesthesia) is the most prevalent type of synesthesia. The presentation of ...
user avatar
  • 19.6k
5 votes

Is there a term in psychology for when a tool is perceived as an extension of your body?

Short answer Possible interesting terms are: distal attribution (externalization) body transfer illusion (rubber hand illusion) embodiment Background This is a very interesting, yet difficult ...
user avatar
  • 19.6k
5 votes
Accepted

Is there a difference between physiological stimulations and psychological stimulations?

Psychology and physiology are at different levels of explanation or levels of analysis. The answer depends entirely on how you view the relationship between such levels and in particular (mental) ...
user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Difference between thoughts and sensations

Short answer Sensations are different from thoughts and are separated in the spatial and temporal domain. The distinction between thoughts and perceptions, however, is less well defined, but can still ...
user avatar
  • 19.6k
5 votes

In psychophysics, why are log luminance rather than absolute luminance values reported?

In general, subjective sensation increases linearly with the the log of physical intensity, which is described by Fechner's law. We are sensitive to small variations when light is dim, but we need ...
user avatar
  • 19.6k
4 votes

If light travels at c, and the human nervous system's speed/perception speed<c, why aren't we not seeing or blind at some times?

I think you are confusing speed with rate. The speed of light is how long it take to for light to get from one point to another, not how often light "events" arrive at the eye. To give an analogy, ...
user avatar
4 votes

Difference between active and passive touch?

The difference is in whether the animal has voluntary control over the touch. If the animal touches another object by moving its body to initiate the touch, then the it is active touch. If the animal ...
user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Is inhibitory brain circuitry involved in cross-modal sensory perception?

As far as I know, there is just one article that explicitly mentions the generation of cross-modal qualia, i.e., visual qualia in response to tactile stimulation (Ortiz et al., 2011). Before ...
user avatar
  • 19.6k
3 votes
Accepted

Is there knowledge of the receptive field patterns of cortical columns in associative brain regions?

Short answer Associative brain areas are not retinotopically organized. Only lower visual areas more upstream from these areas are organized in such a predictable, low-level way. Higher up, things get ...
user avatar
  • 19.6k
3 votes
Accepted

Can binaural beats be generated with carrier tones outside the audible frequency range?

Short answer No, infrasonic or ultrasonic sound cannot generate binaural beats. Background Binaural beats are generated in the brain and are associated with the frequency bands of the EEG. Binaural ...
user avatar
  • 19.6k
3 votes
Accepted

for a persistent perceptual experience, why is video able to have a lower frame rate than audio?

Sound is pressure waves; young humans can hear (aka, detect pressure waves) up to about 20 kHz. To produce these high frequency waves with a speaker with a time-domain signal, it is necessary to have ...
user avatar
  • 5,817
3 votes
Accepted

How quick a flash of light is invisible

It depends on ambient light, but in darkness, humans can detect as few as several photons, perhaps even down to a single photon (though all detection at these low levels is probabilistic - see Tinsley ...
user avatar
  • 5,817
3 votes

What causes the sensation of taste when Dimethyl Sulfoxide (DMSO) is absorbed through the skin?

Short answer It may not be so much the direct action of DMSO on the olfactory sensory system, but the smell of one of its metabolites that is excreted via the pulmonary system and the skin after ...
user avatar
  • 19.6k
2 votes

Does the retina contribute in distinguishing lines and borders?

Short answer Yes, retinal circuitry enhances the perception of contrast. Background In the retina, the neurons that guide the visual signal to the brain, the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), process ...
user avatar
  • 19.6k
2 votes

for a persistent perceptual experience, why is video able to have a lower frame rate than audio?

I don't have a full answer, but it might get things started... You are mixing up two concepts frame rate and sampling rate. In a video presented at 24 fps each frame, potentially, has a wide range of ...
user avatar
  • 2,617
2 votes

How are tactile pleasure and pain differentiated in the somatosensory cortex?

Obviously, pain and touch receptors are represented by entirely different receptors in the skin, i.e. nociceptors and mechanoreceptors, respectively. Each has physically different afferents that carry ...
user avatar
  • 19.6k
2 votes

Synchronization of perception of sensory information

The synchronization of sensory information is called multisensory integration: Multisensory integration, also known as multimodal integration, is the study of how information from the different ...
user avatar
2 votes

Synchronization of perception of sensory information

Short answer The brain actively integrates and synchronizes sensory inputs, up to the point that it actually delays one modality to match it with another. Background Your question is all about ...
user avatar
  • 19.6k
2 votes
Accepted

Is thermoception part of the sense of touch in the 5 human senses or is it a 6th separate sense?

Short answer Heat receptors are often grouped under the 'skin receptors', and hence are bundled along with touch (pressure, vibration, stretch), cold and pain receptors. However, ciliopathy is a ...
user avatar
  • 19.6k
2 votes

Multistable perception with three possibilities

Here’s an image I found that triggers tristable perception (as opposed to just bistable perception): The three possible interpretations are A big cube with a smaller cube in front of it A big cube ...
user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

Has there been any neuroscientific study of polydactyly?

The extra finger seen in polydactyly is often connected only with a bit of skin, but it may contain bone and even joints (Fig. 1). According to the Boston's children's hospital, the extra finger (or ...
user avatar
  • 19.6k
1 vote

The differences between sensory distortions and hallucinations

The differences between illusion and hallucinations are quite clear and have been known for over 100 years. For example, hallucinations are when you see things in total darkness or hear things when ...
user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

What scientific evidence is there for the definable real world quality of redness independent our perception?

Short answer None. Background First off, I am not familiar with the principles as laid out in your question posed by Goethe and Feigenbaum (I'll look into these people, thanks for the pointer!). ...
user avatar
  • 19.6k
1 vote

What is the conceptual difference between causal inference and 'prediction'

Correct me if I'm wrong here, but after some more reading and thinking this is what I took away: both the term 'prediction' and 'cause' here refer to the maximum likelihood of a distribution ($Y$), ...
user avatar
1 vote

What are the definitions of 'multi-channel coding' and 'opponent channel coding'?

Short answer Multi-channel coding in color vision refers to the different photoreceptors in the retina. Opponent-channel coding refers to the opposing color pairs: the red-green and yellow-blue ...
user avatar
  • 19.6k
1 vote

Can binaural beats be generated with carrier tones outside the audible frequency range?

No, the carrier frequency for a binaural beat needs to be less than approximately 1500 Hz. The binaural beat arises because when two tones with slightly different frequencies are added, the ...
user avatar
  • 2,617
1 vote

How are positions and counts of higher concepts encoded in sparse representations?

You are basically asking how to bind different concepts together based off their representation in neurons. The one way I know how to do this is using the Semantic Pointer Architecture (SPA). To ...
user avatar
  • 8,783
1 vote
Accepted

How are positions and counts of higher concepts encoded in sparse representations?

Two ideas on this so far: I think we have neurons representing multiple occurrences of a given feature, for example one neuron for "one face", one for "two faces", etc. At some number it doesn't ...
user avatar
  • 751

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible