5

This is called procedural memory. In textbooks, memory is often broken down into a hierarchy of types. Note that this taxonomy is primarily a guide to language use - ie, how types of memory are labelled or referred to, not how memory is actually organised in the brain. In standard hierarchies, recalling a mathematical formula would fall under semantic ...


4

Just a few words on mnemonics before answering your question. I have been practicing for two years. First because I was impressed how easy it was to remember items using these techniques. My personal best time for learning the order of 52 cards is 1min 40s, which is not really good compared to real competitors, but the point is that practicing 30min a day ...


3

if my brain forms a new connection (register a new information) it can't really know "where does the new element stand in the system of things" There is a lot of contention on the specifics, what we have are theories of Memory and Information processing in the brain, and as such nothing I am going to mention is settled. In a nutshell, there are 2 main ...


3

No, it just makes the intervals suboptimal. Either bury the card if the opposite side came recently or change the card to the direction it will usually appear. (Sometimes it will be the description first.) The forgetting curve, memorizing right at the periphery, will still go back up: There is also the study done by Glenberg Smith & Green about this... ...


2

This seems difficult for a number of reasons. First, are you interested in testing the retrieval of pre-existing semantic memories or the ability to form new semantic memories? It is entirely possible that exposure to nature increases one without the other, so be sure you're testing the one you're interested in (or both, carefully). Second, semantic ...


2

I think that you focus this question in the wrong way. There is no place in the brain where the "instructions" are stored. The brain don't need "know" how it works to work. The way in that the brain works is an emergence from the structure and the biological dynamics. All of this is based in all the layers of biological computation (genetic/molecular/...


2

This type of knowledge is known as "semantic memory"; a type of "declarative memory". We don't yet know where semantic memory is stored in the brain, although there is evidence that hippocampal and/or parahippocampal structures are required to store semantic memory. The fine details of exactly what a "memory" is in terms of neurobiology, where and how it is ...


2

It depends whether the answers are well known facts. If I know well my name, the color of my hair and whether I can ride a bike then semantic memory is used to answer these questions. If I have a doubt whether I can ride a bike, then I may use other types of memory like episodic or even procedural to come up with an answer. Also, I may use episodic memory ...


2

The answer is episodic. Episodic memory is responsible for storing information about events (or episodes) we have experienced; whereas semantic is for storing information about the world, such as the meaning of words. While semantic memory would be required to understand and thus encode the words in the first place, remembering the list of words would ...


2

You are right, procedural memory is defined as implicit. Semantic memory on the other hand is part of explicit memory. It includes declarative knowlegde (knowledge of facts or ideas) that can be made conscious. As far as I know there is no particular relationship between the two but they will definitely interact during cognitive processes. For example, ...


1

What you are describing may be the tip of the tongue (TOT) phenomenon. There are two major explanations for this: the direct-access view and the inferential view. The direct-access view: the memory strength is just not strong enough to recall the item, but strong enough to trigger the recall The inferential view: It claims that TOTs aren't completely ...


1

One hypothesis about the molecular basis of memory is CaMKII Nature Reviews Neuroscience 13, 169-182 (March 2012) | doi:10.1038/nrn3192 Mechanisms of CaMKII action in long-term potentiation http://www.silvalab.com/LMcourse/Lisman2012.pdf


1

I agree there is some murkiness, as learning a list of words doesn't seem to resemble what we normally think of as an 'event'. I think the answer is episodic when there is a single learning episode, and the memory test asks something like "what were the words you learnt in this list in this experiment" (even if the qualification "in this experiment") is ...


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