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7

This question is very similar to others on this forum, and I think almost everything in the question is answered there. Does something exist separate from the physical body? I don't think you will find the answer to that question in cognitive science, but rather in philosophy. Taken from one of the answers: Your thought experiment hinges on the debate ...


6

Self-reported number of selfies has been found to correlate positively with some measures of narcissism in US men (Fox and Rooney, 2015). Fox, J., & Rooney, M. C. (2015). The Dark Triad and trait self-objectification as predictors of men’s use and self-presentation behaviors on social networking sites. Personality & Individual Differences, 76, ...


5

The question you link to has an answer which says: "narcissism in US men" which is quite a different category than what you ask here. Selfie-ism or Selfitis is not a disorder, or by default narcissistic. Why do [female] teenagers take so many selfies? Statista, on their webpage "Selfies Are All About Appearance", reports on a Georgia Institute of ...


5

Short answer Self-pity may not have any evolutionary benefit, but may instead be part of the social capabilities allowing to feel empathy. Empathy in turn is a crucial component in social interactions. The development of strong social skills in early Hominids is believed to have paved the way for evolution of Homo sapiens, arguably the most successful ...


4

This may not totally match your description (the person's worldview, the evilness of the viewed objects), but it's quite analogous to the table of style of attachment, so I put it here. I do notice that the major topic in the attachment theory is about relationship, while the topics in your description seem to be about moral in general, but I suspect that ...


4

Giving a dollar to homeless people on the street serves no aid to the donor, since the only difference is who has that dollar, and clearly to have the dollar is better than not. This action is therefore entirely altruistic.


4

One way to think about this is called "self-distancing" (e.g., Kross & Ayduk, 2011), which has primarily been studied in terms of emotion regulation. Self-distancing is when you view your experiences from a third-person perspective. This is generally considered to be an adaptive form of self-reflection (as opposed to rumination, which is generally ...


3

This question is quite broad, firstly, because these tests measure different (though interrelated) cognitive faculties and at different developmental stages and secondly because there is a lot to say for each sensory impairment. However, it touches on quite interesting topics for which there have been many studies and I think a summary of the findings can be ...


3

Short answer: ... on the balance, most people tend to view themselves positively. Longer answer: Not much is clear about self-image. One thing that is clear is that self-image is not one thing. In the research literature, it can refer to a conglomerate of fairly independent / mildly correlated constructs, such as body image, self-schema, self-...


2

The University of Zurich has a pdf file of an article which was directly from the University of Rochester School of Arts and Sciences. The article has an outline of many criticisms of SDT from behaviourists such as Eisenberger, Cameron and Pierce, which were later discounted as invalid. References to all relevant articles are within the pdf file.


2

I suppose this needs a more in-depth answer, but a quick search found one twin study (Bartels et al. 2012), which not only correlated IQ with Big5, but also tried to determine how much of that has a shared genetic basis: Significant positive phenotypic correlations with IQ were seen for agreeableness (r = 0.21) and openness to experience (r = 0.32). A ...


2

Re-reading the whole quote and not just the first 3 sentences there does seem to be some ramblings which need citations to back his claims. The crux of your question: I am puzzled [with] what he means by [the] word reveal above? why would you not want to reveal (whatever he means) yourself? The first 3 sentences loosely refer to the concept of the ...


2

So basically the question eventually became about the influences of on-line activities on changing (improving in this case) one's behavior if not downright one's personality in real life. There is a body of evidence that this is not uncommon, especially with children, adolescents and young adults. It's not an incredibly well research topic, so I'll mention ...


2

I encourage you to read what evolutionary psychology has to say about what you're talking about. This science is maybe the origin of your "dark" vision but it is due to a common oversimplification. As my explanation could be no way better than Steven Pinker's one about this issue, I extract here this paragraphs that contain a clarification about your ...


2

TL;DR: In one study I found, major depression preceded onset of BDD in 22% of cases (Gunstad & Phillips, 2003). More Complete Answer Reading Phillips & Stout (2006) linked in the answer by @Fizz, they state that (emphasis added) Our findings additionally suggest that BDD is not simply a symptom of depression. If it were, BDD would be expected ...


2

TLDR version: it appears depression-as-a-risk-factor-for-BDD hasn't actually been studied, so the quoted UK NGO claims might stem from a blurring of risk factors and comorbidity. Let's start by recalling what risk factor actually means (it does not mean cause): Risk factors are characteristics at the biological, psychological, family, community, or ...


2

This broad article introduces theories of what unconscious thought is and how it relates to conscious thoughts: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unconscious_thought_theory . I recommend it. 1) All thinking is preceded by or relies on unconscious processes. Consciousness gives a narrow view of all cognition in the same sort of way that our eyes only see a ...


1

Intelligence as measured by g is most associated with Openness, at modest levels, about r = .10-.15, meaning that only 1% of the variance of each is explained by the other.


1

Short answer You are confusing belief or faith with a hypothesis. Background Instead of a methodological answer, this question might, perhaps arguably, be tackled better from a slightly more philosophical angle. Let's go through the relevant terminologies. Belief is An acceptance that something exists or is true, especially one without proof. A ...


1

What you have here is a hypothesis and it's almost impossible to answer this conclusively because you can't design a randomized study but only look at correlations. In addition, "narcissism" itself is far from a simple concept and used differently by different researchers. For instance some see is as synonymous with self-esteem and self-confidence, some ...


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