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One finding from the Reproducibility Project was the following: Van Bavel et al wrote that Inbar (2) notes that the reproducibility rate of social psychology (28%) is lower than cognitive psychology (53%). In general, one might expect that subdisciplines with the following features to have greater reproducibility issues: particularly interested in ...


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Check out Psychological Science articles with the "Open Data Badge". There's also the Journal of Open Psychology Data.


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The whole point of these lies is to prevent participants from changing their answers because they want to please the researchers or convey their personal beliefs about a topic. It is typical to inform participants about the true purpose at the end of the study if this is possible. Other times, studies use purposefully vague language in describing the ...


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As far as I know, short answer is no - there is no gold standard for EEG files. But EEG is a time series (amplitude) from several channels. So the most common way to represent it is columns as electrodes and rows as points of time. I think almost all software is possible to read such structure as txt file. But EEG is not only time series. Usually it is ...


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See this previous question about journals that specialise in publishing psychological datasets. See the reproducible-research tag for some more specific examples. PlosOne Psychology has recently increased its requirements to supply raw data. So recent psychological research in the journal is more likely to have data attached to the manuscript. I did a ...


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High standards are being proposed, but not taken up very quickly. Psychology is currently undergoing a transition in methods between the traditional approach of hypothesizing after results are known (e.g., Bem, 1980) and new statistical and design methods that have fewer false positives, such as focusing on effect sizes and confidence intervals over ...


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No provocative experiment needed. Some of the major taxonomies within personality psychology have well-validated measures for honesty, and have been used in massive samples that could already address this question. I would start by doing a search on Google Scholar for those measures and the types of success you mention. E.g., https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


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The relevant concepts are set size and span. The set size is usually the amount of items to be remembered in a memory task, but technically only refers to the amount of information that must be held in (working) memory to complete the memory task at hand, while the span is the amount actually remembered. With this in mind, your topic can be stated as being ...


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The field you're talking about is probably computational neuroscience. In general, the advice I would give is that the department you are in doesn't much matter. There are people who study neuroscience that are in engineering, comp. sci, psychology, whatever. I know University of Chicago has an entire program in Computational Neuroscience. Probably the best ...


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As a matter of anecdote, I've used some of this data for teaching purposes, and I've heard of others doing the same. As Bryan notes, there is a list of journal articles that have used the data: https://openpsychometrics.org/_rawdata/cited/ This includes many well-regarded journals in personality and individual differences research. One main limitation is ...


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As far as I know, this effect cannot be eliminated by any practical means, other than stratifying the subjects into groups according to type of drug, dosage, duration of use etc. and use statistical testing to look for any differences between the groups with, e.g., linear mixed modeling. However, a cursory search on Google Scholar yields multiple studies ...


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Two major terms: "Spatial Representation": of pitch height (lower/higher): https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0010027705000260 emotions (down/up): https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02699930500347794 "Spatial Analogy": https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5256459/ Some papers argue that even time has strong spatial ...


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Short answer Many individual papers report non-reproducible findings. I would advise you to look for review papers and meta-analysis studies to get the bigger picture. If not available, you can consider to set up a literature study yourself. Background Nature puts it down neatly (emphasis mine): Science moves forward by corroboration – when ...


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You talk about the challenge of the variability in EEG data formats --- While I am (unfortunately) not aware of a standard EEG data format, there are attempts to standardize the way that EEG data could be shared: The Brain Imaging Data Structure (BIDS) tries to clarifying the structure of directories and meta data necessary when sharing neuro-imaging data. ...


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I have started to see a fair bit of discussion about reproducible meta-analysis. Tim Churches seems to have a github repository with a few examples of meta-analyses in R. See in particular the public health example: RMarkdown source Formatted Markdown output


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Short answer There is no official database I can find that collects the different effects proposed in psychology and track how they replicate. However, reputable psychology papers are published in professional journals and are re-examined all the time with meta-analyses and further research, also published in professional journals. Professional ...


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The basis of your question ..particle physics doesn't suffer nearly as much from the reproducibility crisis because it has much higher standards than the social sciences You said this in response to innisfree (2019) The 'replication crisis' is that many effects in social sciences (and, although to a lesser extent, other scientific fields) couldn't be ...


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In addition to the previous answer, there's also a document called The Belmont Report which describes the ethical principles and guidelines for conducting research involving human subjects. Oftentimes, it is listed out in the informed consent form that deception will be used in the study, and it is also required to give out an adequate debrief session, ...


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'psychology' is too big for this in general. But lots of people do care a lot about replication and there have been some nice many-labs efforts to asses the state of replicability across the field. Klein, et al. (2014). was one attempt. This study is taking the usual logic of inference about a population (in this case 'effects') from a small sample, so it ...


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You can simply use a questionnaire based measurement scale. I recommend the PANAS scale by Watson, Clark, and Tellegen (1988), which has extensive support in literature. It is a twenty-item questionnaire, utilising 5-point likert scales, that consolidates into two scales: positive, and negative affect. In recent research, two broad, general factors--...


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(This answer your question only partially). Honesty and success are made of many things. Quite a bunch of studies found interesting correlations between honesty and success at the collective/cultural level. (They measure the success in term of wealth, trust, quality of the institution, rights, etc.). Just a sample to give an idea: ● Edward C. Banfield (...


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To add to the existing answer, honesty-humility is a major factor in the HEXACO framework of personality. There is a comprehensive list of papers using the HEXACO framework here organised under a wide range of headings: http://hexaco.org/references My sense of the literature is that honesty-humility in the HEXACO framework is related more to ethical ...


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As far as my knowledge goes, I don't think these two types of reasoning in cogsci are any different to other forms of inductive or deductive reasoning: one is a bottom-up approach and the other a top-down process. Deductive reasoning starts at the general and moves towards the specific, going from theory to hypothesis, observation to a confirmation. This ...


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