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Harvill mentions an estimate by Lord (1959). Lord (1959) presents some data for the standard error of measurement for some moderately difficult cognitive measures. While there are many caveats (e.g., the estimate of the standard error is most accurate for scores around 50% and the estimates are based on tests that are neither particularly easy or ...


3

'Precision' in classical test theory Most accounts of classical test theory do not have a notion of precision as such, but occasionally, reliability may be called precision instead. The relationship is probably most concisely illustrated with the standard dartboards. This is also explained on the Wikipedia Item Response Theory page, but as you can see, in ...


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Short answer There is no official database I can find that collects the different effects proposed in psychology and track how they replicate. However, reputable psychology papers are published in professional journals and are re-examined all the time with meta-analyses and further research, also published in professional journals. Professional ...


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'psychology' is too big for this in general. But lots of people do care a lot about replication and there have been some nice many-labs efforts to asses the state of replicability across the field. Klein, et al. (2014). was one attempt. This study is taking the usual logic of inference about a population (in this case 'effects') from a small sample, so it ...


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To me the most natural solution is to just use item response theory (IRT). IRT has been around for a few decades, so it is well established, implemented in a variety of software packages and provides a sensible, extensible framework for this type of problem. Essentially, one assumes an underlying latent construct of interest, values of which should drive ...


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Although I don't know the answer, I think it would be important to explain what you exactly wish to do with the re-test? If you solely wish to know how reliable the score is, you could do the test on day 1 and the re-test on day 2? The longer the time, the higher the chance that a person's life is subject to change (e.g., the loss of relatives, or medical ...


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