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The APA style manual does not provide specific guidelines for linear mixed models. Additionally, a review of studies using linear mixed models reported that the psychological papers surveyed differed 'substantially' in how they reported on these models (Barr, Levy, Scheepers and Tily, 2013). It depends greatly on your study, in other words. Normatively ...


4

You should get the APA Style Manual (currently in the 6th edition). Chapter 5 describes the effective use of graphic elements in text. It provides readers with guidance on which graphic element is best suited to the data being delivered as well as detailed instruction on table and figure preparation. It has lots of examples of how to report individual ...


2

I wrote the following function that takes the fit object returned by factanal and new data that you provide (e.g., a data frame or matrix with identical variable names), along with the original data. score_new_data <- function(fit, new_data, original_data) { means <- sapply(original_data[,row.names(fit$correlation)], mean) sds <- sapply(...


2

You write: When controlling for age, gender and anxiety, participants high in sense of humour will have higher life satisfaction. This is standard regression. Predictors that are control variables are the same as any other predictors, it's just that their inclusion in the model is mostly there to facilitate a desired interpretation of a focal predictor. ...


2

There are some informative examples in Baayen, Davidson and Bates (2008), though some of their advice is outdated, having been supplanted by Barr et al. (2013) cited in the answer above. I found it useful to read these two papers together, though. I'd like to add my voice to @Christian in stressing that one common gap in reporting such models is which ...


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