6

The APA style manual does not provide specific guidelines for linear mixed models. Additionally, a review of studies using linear mixed models reported that the psychological papers surveyed differed 'substantially' in how they reported on these models (Barr, Levy, Scheepers and Tily, 2013). It depends greatly on your study, in other words. Normatively ...


5

General reporting recommendations such as that of APA Manual apply. One should report exact p-value and an effect size along with its confidence interval. In the case of likelihood ratio test one should report the test's p-value and how much more likely the data is under model A than under model B. Example: The data is 7.3, 95% CI [6.8,8.1] times more ...


5

Nature Neuroscience offers such a possibility. http://www.nature.com/news/nature-journals-offer-double-blind-review-1.16931 See also Does anyone know of any clinical psychology journals that use a double-blind review process?


4

The distinction between experiment and quasi-experiment is often made in undergraduate psychology courses. In general, the term quasi-experiment is used to identify studies that fall short of a controlled experiment in some respect: e.g., pre-existing groups; allocation of participants to groups in a non-random way. In some cases, repeated measures ...


3

The DSM-5 is the current version of the diagnostic manual of the APA. It's hard to say there is any such thing as a "strict neuro-psychiatric" definition; these definitions are by their nature not strict at all, but the DSM is probably the closest thing to some level of unified understanding in the field. That doesn't mean everyone agrees with it - ...


3

This question may be better directed to academia.se. In the first instance, you should check the editorial requirements of the journal you are targeting. Most journals prescribe that it is mandatory to spell out acronyms with first usage. It is possible that some very specific technical journals will allow common terminology through without being specific. ...


3

As an update, this paper may be helpful, though it comes from the medical field. References Monsalves, M.J., Bangdiwala, A.S., Thabane, A. et al. LEVEL (Logical Explanations & Visualizations of Estimates in Linear mixed models): recommendations for reporting multilevel data and analyses. BMC Med Res Methodol 20, 3 (2020).


2

There are some informative examples in Baayen, Davidson and Bates (2008), though some of their advice is outdated, having been supplanted by Barr et al. (2013) cited in the answer above. I found it useful to read these two papers together, though. I'd like to add my voice to @Christian in stressing that one common gap in reporting such models is which random ...


2

The likelihood ratio test is distributed as χ²with degrees of freedom = the change in degrees of freedom between the two models. So, to give an example dropping one parameter from a model, you would report it like this: χ² (1) = 3.4, p = 0.065


1

Apart from the DSM-5, the World Health Organisation maintains the International Classification of Diseases, currently on it's 11th revision (ICD-11). It contains far more than just psychological disorders, but these are included.


1

Very interesting question! I would mention https://www.semanticscholar.org/, they do something similar to scite. They classify citations into e.g. "Cites Results" or "Cites Background", they describe their method in this paper.


1

This is not a complete answer, but more based on surface observations. At time of posting, Journal of Neuroscience Methods has an impact factor of 2.0. This is quite a respectable impact factor. The scimagojr puts in the second quartile of "neuroscience (miscellaneous)" journals http://www.scimagojr.com/journalsearch.php?q=16765&tip=sid&clean=0 It ...


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