6

The APA style manual does not provide specific guidelines for linear mixed models. Additionally, a review of studies using linear mixed models reported that the psychological papers surveyed differed 'substantially' in how they reported on these models (Barr, Levy, Scheepers and Tily, 2013). It depends greatly on your study, in other words. Normatively ...


5

General reporting recommendations such as that of APA Manual apply. One should report exact p-value and an effect size along with its confidence interval. In the case of likelihood ratio test one should report the test's p-value and how much more likely the data is under model A than under model B. Example: The data is 7.3, 95% CI [6.8,8.1] times more ...


5

Nature Neuroscience offers such a possibility. http://www.nature.com/news/nature-journals-offer-double-blind-review-1.16931 See also Does anyone know of any clinical psychology journals that use a double-blind review process?


4

The distinction between experiment and quasi-experiment is often made in undergraduate psychology courses. In general, the term quasi-experiment is used to identify studies that fall short of a controlled experiment in some respect: e.g., pre-existing groups; allocation of participants to groups in a non-random way. In some cases, repeated measures ...


2

There are some informative examples in Baayen, Davidson and Bates (2008), though some of their advice is outdated, having been supplanted by Barr et al. (2013) cited in the answer above. I found it useful to read these two papers together, though. I'd like to add my voice to @Christian in stressing that one common gap in reporting such models is which ...


1

There is this 2009 article on the APA website (The APA are the writers of the DSM) It states that There is widespread sentiment that it is not helpful to the field to have two separate classification systems for mental disorders. [However], Many important distinctions between the two systems remain. The article also mentioned that Geoffrey Reed (WHO ...


1

This is not a complete answer, but more based on surface observations. At time of posting, Journal of Neuroscience Methods has an impact factor of 2.0. This is quite a respectable impact factor. The scimagojr puts in the second quartile of "neuroscience (miscellaneous)" journals http://www.scimagojr.com/journalsearch.php?q=16765&tip=sid&clean=0 It ...


1

The likelihood ratio test is distributed as χ²with degrees of freedom = the change in degrees of freedom between the two models. So, to give an example dropping one parameter from a model, you would report it like this: χ² (1) = 3.4, p = 0.065


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