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Beta blockers (β1-Blockers) lower norepinephrine release (Berg, 2014), however it seems that the jury is still out on whether there is an effective and ethical way to prevent Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Donovan (2010) states that there isn't enough strong evidence on its efficacy. Another point it makes (on page 11) is that... Using any beta-...


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There is a large and diverse literature on this topic which paints a complex picture of the relationship between trauma and empathy. Some studies have found significant trauma symptoms to be related to less empathy. A study of Israeli children who had experienced the trauma of Arab missile attacks found that 66% of children with very negative attitudes ...


5

In order for something to be diagnosed as a disorder by a mental health professional, the client typically experiences distress and impairment in activities of daily functioning. If the time frame is under 3 to 6 months, please consider "Acute Stress Disorder" as a possibility. I agree that the DSM V is going to be a useful resource for diagnostics. ...


4

The DSM (Diagnostics and Statistics Manual) is used here in the UK as well as in the US. The 5th edition, which is the current edition, stipulates the criteria required to diagnose PTSD here is an info sheet on it. You could get a copy of DSM-5 in the library or buy it from Amazon. To answer your specific questions: Do the traumas have to be of a certain ...


4

I believe, and I do not know if good quality epidemiological evidence exists, that such situations may trigger abnormal illness representations among medical professionals. Factitious disorders, for instance, I believe could be some way to deflect depression in some individuals. Along with abnormal illness representations could also come abnormal moral ...


4

Rape and sexual assault definitely does not only affect the assaulted, but also the friends and family as they can feel helpless, not knowing what is best to do to help and support the assaulted. As I mentioned in the comments, support groups such as RAINN (US) Call 800 656 4673 or 800 656 HOPE https://www.rainn.org and Survivors Trust (UK) Call 0808 801 ...


4

With "normal" risk taking related to "thrill seekers" what you could be talking about can be Sensation Seeking (Zuckerman, 2007) Risky behavior can be an expression of a normal, genetically influenced personality trait, sensation seeking. Its expression in risky behaviors such as extreme and risky sports, vocations, substance abuse, unsafe sex, and crime,...


4

An answer I provided before on the possibility of recalling forgotten memories briefly talks about False Memory Syndrome and PTSD. As stated in the answer, Memory is not fixed as it is very plastic and as pointed out in the article you referenced (Hyman, et al., 1995), people are susceptible to creating false memories. To answer your question on ...


3

First, your question pertains to two possible populations: "less long-lasting" PTSD is diagnosed as acute stress disorder (ASD); PTSD cannot be diagnosed until at least one month after exposure to the inciting trauma, and ASD sometimes resolves without progression to PTSD. "less intense" PTSD is usually diagnosed as an adjustment ...


3

Why might sleeping on the floor alleviate PTSD symptoms? Question: Does sleeping on the floor have similar neurotransmitter effects, as sleeping under a weighted blanket might? Psychiatrically, would it be expected that a person having PTSD would find similar results sleeping under a weighted blanket as they do when they sleep on the floor? There is also a ...


3

I find this question very interesting, for this reason i did some digging. Short answer Yes, there're many studies about neurobiological implication of "repressed memories" and they underline how informations do not disappear. Through the mechanisms of complex neural processes, it is obvious that this information is exposed to various kinds of cellular and ...


2

I can offer a case study - Elisabeth Kubler-Ross, creator of the infamous "Kubler-Ross Model" or "five stages of grief" (Denial, Anger, Bargaining, Depression, Acceptance). Her entire career as a psychiatrist was spent working with terminally ill patients and their grieving families. She strongly believed in a life after death and outer-body experiences, and ...


2

It is reported that mild traumatic brain injury does not produce Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder however, according to this report in the American Journal of Psychiatry, severe TBI could possibly lead to PTSD in approximately 27% of cases. In this study of 96 patients (77 men and 19 women), after 6 months following hospital discharge for severe traumatic ...


2

TLDR The DSM-5 recognises the epidemiology of anxiety within PTSD, and the reason for the lack of genetic correlation is the fact that in PTSD, the anxiety is exogenous (environmental) rather than endogenous (biological via genes or other means). The debate The DSM-5, is the current version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders ...


2

One can't be certain what that kind of allusion refers to, but there has been a level of controversy stemming from the changes to the trauma criterion in DSM-IV (it was changed again in DSM-5). The change in DSM-IV--which does correspond with the time frame you mention--was seriously lambasted in some corners, e.g.: Criterion A1, certifies three groups of ...


1

It sounds like you're talking about what psychologists and neuroscientists commonly call episodic future thinking or mental simulation. In this cognitive state, we simulate possible future scenarios, often pertaining to social interactions we might have, or survival situations. This allows us to pseudo-test hypotheses regarding the possible outcomes for an ...


1

My understanding is that the internalizing/externalizing dichotomy refers to the way symptoms are expressed, not the source/cause of the disorder. Internalizing disorders are those that mostly have an internal impact and tend to lead sufferers to withdraw or hide their affliction. Externalizing disorders tend to impact others more directly with outward-...


1

The meta-analysis on anxiety referred to by Church, D. et al. (2018) was performed by Sebastian & Nelms, (2017) was published in a questionable journal. This critique by Ferrara found that four studies suffered from two fatal flaws: they had a small number of participants, and EFT was compared to waitlist controls that did nothing. These studies ...


1

Noise sensitivity aggregates in families and the estimate of heritability is 36% (Shepherd et al., 2015). A popular scientific source states that misophonia is not caused by a traumatic event, but might as well be caused by (seemingly) harmless sounds in the past that become associated with stress responses. Both PTSD and misophonia are classified as ...


1

Actually, epidemiological studies are not as clear-cut, showing some overlap/comorbidity Spinhoven et al. (2014): Prevalence of 5-year recency PTSD among anxiety and depressive disorders was 9.2%, and comorbidity, in particular with major depression, was high (84.4%). Comorbidity was associated with female gender, all types of childhood trauma, ...


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I believe that the concept of 'subthreashold symptoms' refers to a situation where a client clearly presents with symptoms of a given condition but, crucially, they present with too few symptoms to meet the diagnostic criteria. This link, which hopefully also satisfies Seanny123's request for a document, states: Although DSM-IV acknowledged the clinical ...


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