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Generally speaking, yes; it's relatively more common for psychosis to be comorbid with or present after diagnosed Autism. For a good overview of this topic read Autism and Schizophrenia (Yael Dvir, MD and Jean A. Frazier, MD). COS (Child Onset Schizophrenia)—the onset of psychosis before age 13 years—is considered a rare and severe form of schizophrenia....


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Can drugs cause a psychosis or only unlock it Drugs can cause acute psychosis, but are not associated with a precipitation of a chronic psychotic state. Animal studies have shown that various drugs (including LSD, ketamine and amphetamine) can induce acute psychosis in genetically non-disposed animals (Ham et al., 2017). However, in general, drugs do not ...


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Unfortunately hallucinations of visual type seldom occur with schizophrenia. When visual hallucinations occur in schizophrenia or more frequently (but still uncommon) in other disorders they are rather unlike a simulation of the current world - e.g. a closed door becoming open in the room. In addition patient in a hallucinatory state is very affectively ...


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Short answer Because some neuroses can involve psychotic episodes, it depends on the cause of the psychotic behaviour. Longer Answer When looking at the difference between neuroses and psychoses, although BPD, Bipolar Disorder and PTSD are generally neuroses, they can involve psychotic episodes in some cases. For example, with Bipolar Disorder (Mind, ...


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The short answer to your question Can a person with delusions completely acknowledge their delusions is yes. But it depends. There are quite a few psychological disorders that have symptoms of delusion or hallucination. Bentall et al. (2009) took a look at the structure of paranoid delusions. They concluded that emotion related and cognitive processes ...


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Definition of Neurosis Today, neurosis (plural: neuroses) is a class of functional mental disorders involving chronic distress but neither delusions nor hallucinations (Wikipedia). As well as other theories, neuroses play a central role in Freudian psychoanalysis (whereby all of Freud's theories are considered by many to be pseudoscientific. More can be ...


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Short answer Psychosis can result in a loss of a sense of reality. Neurosis leaves the person suffering in contact with the here and now. Further, neurosis is an old term and was used as an umbrella term. Now its use has declined and rather more specific diagnoses are used. Background - Psychosis is according to Medicine Net: [A] mental illness that ...


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Short answer Visual hallucinations in psychotic disorders like schizophrenia are typically not simple transformations of an inanimate lifeless object into another state. They are not a car turning upside down, or a door suddenly opening. Instead, they are often 'de novo' images or scenes, with religious and frightening content and just beyond grasp. ...


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There seem to be multiple studies generally pointing to a delay of clinical antipsychotic action of these drugs, typically between a week and two weeks (e.g.., Zedkova et al (2011) and Mousavi et al. (2013)). However, there is evidence that antipsychotics may start working after a day, or even within a few hours after starting the meds. See for an ...


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Research into the "how" is ongoing. From the most recent review I could find, the effect of cannabis on the dopamine system is not entirely elucidated, even on a quantitative level: The onset of effects of THC appears to be delayed relative to the onset of other psychotomimetic drugs, suggesting that the effects of THC may be downstream to its primary ...


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This question pertains to the perception of psychosis by psychiatrists and not to up-to-date interpretation of research data on psychosis classification. So I'll focus on how pure psychosis is roughly conceptualised by the average psychiatrist. First of all, some diagnosis such as bipolar disorder or schizo-affective disorder, while usually being considered ...


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