14

Short answer Freudian Psychology is considered by many to be pseudoscience, but as pointed out in another answer, there have recently been increasing numbers of comparisons between psychoanalysis and other depth psychology schools (e.g. a long-term study of CBT vs psychoanalysis for depression, where CBT is not much effective) with results which show that ...


14

As far as I know, dreams are meaningless information, strung into a story or series of events and interpretation are therefore highly subjective. The theory that I know best is that dreams are a result of memory consolidation during sleep. Of course, this is still controversial. Memory consolidation is explained (simple version) as follows: during ...


12

Freudian psychology (and it's derivatives) are indeed pseudoscience, by and large. That said, Freud was arguably the first to systematically theorize and study human behavior and cognition, and in so doing laid the foundation for the scientific study of psychology. It's generally useful for the purpose of such discussions to distinguish between Freudian ...


7

Yes, they are still in use, and they provide rather bad information. My former advisor once worked with a clinician who told him that the main reason they're any better than using the weather report as a projective stimulus is that the Rorschach tests have been in use as-is for decades. Hence we have a better understanding of how people normally react to ...


7

Jocasta complex syndrome is what you are referring to. In psychoanalytic analysis, the Jocasta complex is the incestuous sexual desire of a mother towards her son. SOURCE


6

In the context of the question I think it makes sense to limit the scope to earlier developments in psychoanalysis. Thompson (1957) gives an overview of what can be called psychoanalytic schools. She includes: Freudian psychoanalysis Individual psychology (Alfred Adler) Analytical psychology (Carl Gustav Jung) Object relations theory (Sándor Ferenczi, Otto ...


6

We could have scientific clinical study of the reports of dreams. Given that the dreams don't relate to specific real world events and often have very bizarre properties there's no reason to believe the report has much to do with what really happened. Therefore, from a clinicians standpoint they're useful in that you're in a relaxed state when they occur ...


5

The correct translation of Verneinung in English is denial. Roy Baumeister, Karen Dale, and Kristin Sommer (2002) have reviewed empirical evidence for (or against) seven of Freud's defense mechanisms and have found that "denial [has] been amply shown in studies". You can read about the findings in detail in the article itself, which is currently avialable ...


4

Hard question to answer. Some of his ideas appear to have found little in the way of experimental support, some of his ideas are at present untestable, some have been supported by experimental studies. The late psychometrician Paul Kline conducted a number of studies and found mixed results. I can recommend his book on Freudian theory and psychology. He ...


4

The professional term for hand-writing analysis seems to be "Graphology" and there is no clear evidence that it could be used to predict a person's behaviour or character. For a starting point see the wikipedia page, then there are this article in the New York Times from 1993 and this more recent article from BBC from 2005 for more casual explanations of the ...


4

Paco Mitchell at Depth Insights lists the following reference for “the unconscious can only wish”: For an informed critique of Freud’s comment and of psychoanalytic theory in general, see C. G. Jung, The Theory of Psychoanalysis (New York: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 1915). Full text is available at Archive.org. You may also want to search for ...


4

I believe you are referring to Erich Fromm's work on the "having" (not "happening") and "being" modes. See here


3

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. It started as a pure-conditioning school, but it later on took on evidence from studies in cognition. It's the school that holds the most science behind it. Some of its history can be found at its wikipedia page: Although the early behavioral approaches were successful in many of the neurotic disorders, they had little ...


2

Yes. The best reviews are done circumscribed to certain areas of focus, like disorder. For example, here is a study that examines the comparative efficacy of all "bona fide" treatments for trauma (e.g., prolonged exposure, EMDR, cognitive therapy, etc): http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18055080 There are also wider comparisons, but these are fraught with ...


2

Those courses you mention are a part of a much larger "personal development" market that really boomed in the 90s, and keeps going on ever since. There's a book called "Letting go: a pathway of surrender" and the part that really jumped at me is that the author lists dozens of different flavors of that "personal development" ...


2

There are several important aspects to your question. Firstly it would be good to know what you would understand by modern science. Psychoanalysis is clearly outside the range of physics, mathematics or computer science. If you look deeper into it - so is an awful lot, if not all, of positivistic psychologies (especially when applied to psychological ...


2

All this verbage, without a single answer. The archetypes are the forms with which we populate our psyches. They are only outlines. The context is filled in individually, and therefore differs individually. To use your example of "father." We can all agree upon the existence of "fatherness," the condition of being a father. Thus, the archetype "Father" ...


2

I finally found it, apparently it's called The Forest Test Hindrances and annoyances that take away our happiness, entrenched fears, values ​​that govern our choices and behavior. The forest test tries to clarify and interpret many of these issues based on the approach from which it was designed: relational psychoanalysis. According to this theory, our ...


1

If you are new to Psychoanalysis, you cannot go far wrong with starting by having a look at the 4-part YouTube Video Series put together by the Freud Museum of London along with their article which gives an outline on Freud's Theories (Are Freud's Theories All About Sex?) Reading Freud's Complete Works as suggested by @GogaVachnadze could be heavy going if ...


1

I believe you're looking for this: https://www.valas.fr/IMG/pdf/Freud_Complete_Works.pdf


1

Short answer The ego, the collective unconscious and the persona collectively help the person to self-actualise and reach individuation through the elements of the psyche being in harmony with each other. Long answer A lot of what I am providing in this answer has been put together using my knowledge of Jungian Psychology from my 3 year Psychotherapy ...


1

Freud's psychic apparatus is pure theoretical psychology, which isn't cognition's best friend. It's really hard to think how one could map the 3 construct to cognition (perhaps id is the easiest - primal brain, instinct). But even if you could, suggesting an inconsistency between 3 brain mega-systems to explain dreams is a bit of a stretch (albeit not ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible