20

Yes and No By the standards of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorder (or DSM-IV in its current form), perhaps the most prominent all-in-one manual to assist physicians in accurately defining a patient's disorder, has specific criteria for a disorder, including: is associated with present distress (e.g., a painful symptom) or disability (...


9

Short Answer Science is hard, brains are complicated, and the premises of your question that there is not work being done or advancements in this area is false. Longer Answer There is no known specific cause of bipolar disorder (as for many other psychological disorders). There is no simple statement like "bipolar disorder happens when you are low on XYZ ...


8

I am not a professional, but it is my understanding that it is common for major depression to not show up in adults until the age of 30 to 60 years old; see for example, Table 2 of Lifetime Prevalence and Age-of-Onset Distributions of DSM-IV Disorders in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication, Mood Disorders - Major Depressive Disorder. Overall, the ...


8

In this paper, the authors note that bipolar disorder and schizophrenia share many abnormal resting state network connections. But some connections are specific to bipolar disorder and others are specific to schizophrenia. I think to really describe the two illnesses, one must look at specific biological data. Fuzzy terms like "mood disorder" and "thought ...


8

Haldol (haloperidol) is mainly known for its antipsychotic properties to treat schizophrenia. It's an aged antipsychotic with a lot of side effects. Because of this, haloperidol is nowadays mostly replaced by the atypical antipsychotics, such as clozapine as first-line treatment. Haloperidol's primary mechanism of action is believed to be related to its ...


7

I think it can go both ways. According to Tesser's Self Evaluation Maintenance Theory, any two people in a relationship make themselves feel better by comparing themselves to each other. The key idea is that if you are closer to a person then you will tend to feel more jealous. For example, suppose your best friend got a really fancy car. You will naturally ...


7

The Dark Triad traits you speak of are subclinical personality traits, therefore they cannot be diagnosed. Everyone carries some of the characteristics of these traits. People high on these traits are also not considered to be defective, even better they may in some environments be considered to be an advantage (e.g., business areas). You may want to read ...


7

The wikipedia article you linked to regarding the term Gaslighting has references to clinical and research literature. Dorpat, (1996) talks about the incidences of Gaslighting conducted by therapists. In treatment, the psychotherapist is in a position of power. Often, this power is unintentionally abused. While trying to embody a compassionate concern ...


6

A Love Circuit? The idea that there is a "love circuit" has little evidence (for or against it). But in general studies that look at "love" (however defined) reveal broad activation across multiple intrinsic neural networks that are involved in many different cognitive processes (in favor of a constructivist view of emotions). Consider the image from a ...


6

Most of your list fits for symptoms of lack of will to cooperate. Lack of will to cooperate is likely triggered by lack of sympathy, which again may be triggered by lack of trust. I say 'may' because there are several possible reasons that such situations may occur. Lack of will to cooperate may also be due to personality traits, especially due to low score ...


6

Yes, the psychedelic Renaissance/ third wave (as I've heard it being called) is steadily gaining momentum. I almost feel like mentioning How to Change Your Mind by Michael Pollan here is too obvious, but just to be safe, here's a few links and a cultural review. There is also an exhaustive summary on Trippingly.net!


5

People often fall under the spell of the "more is better" assumption when it comes to supplements, but, while B6 (pyridoxine) has many lifesaving applications (e.g., treating a specific type of seizure, or [protecting the system from acute neurotoxicity of chemotherapeutic agents, B6 can be downright toxic in high concentrations. Patients with abnormally ...


5

It seems to depend on the reason for denying their illness... Egosyntonic: ... a term referring to behaviors, values, feelings that are in harmony with or acceptable to the needs and goals of the ego, or consistent with one's ideal self-image. ... Many personality disorders are considered to be egosyntonic ... Anorexia ... is also considered ...


5

Solitary confinement serves no therapeutic purpose. Two uses of solitary confinement are generally acknowledged, namely as safety measure to protect the individual from themselves or to protect others from harm, or as a measure of discipline (that is, punishment). Deprived of normal human interaction, many segregated prisoners reportedly suffer from mental ...


5

DSM-5 is the go to book for psychiatric dignoses and I would strongly recommend you pick up a copy if you are studying Psychiatry. I am going to split my answer in 3 as you are talking about two different disgnoses and the 3rd part will be making a comparison between the two. Hypochondriasis The more recently approved Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of ...


5

In my recent graduate school psychology training, no therapy of this type was ever mentioned. In fact, conversion disorders are under some scrutiny because, in at least 33% of cases, an organic cause eventually is discerned. Medscape on conversion disorders In-patient treatment is uncommon these days, and most modern psychological treatment includes ...


5

This is purely all about terminology. Somatic means of the body; bodily; physical. whereas the psycho part of psychosomatic refers to the fact that the somatic problem (symptom or disorder) is created through psychological means (with no medical evidence of a physical problem e.g. broken bone and/or torn ligaments). Symptom refers to an observable ...


4

Your question presupposes that 'deep' (in the brainstem) is the same thing as difficult to extinguish. But the anatomical location doesn't tell us how difficult it is to unlearn a CTA. One reason CTAs are difficult to extinguish is because extinction relies upon exposure to the cue (taste, in this case). And not many animals (including humans) will ...


4

wiki's Psychopathology page should give you some insight into this issue. First, you must realize that a psychological illness is generally different than a biological illness. The difficulty when dealing with most (not all) conditions included in the APA's DSM (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of mental disorders) is that there is no truly objective way of ...


4

Grønbæk and Nielsen (2007) conducted a randomized, controlled study of the Minnesota model for treating alcohol dependence in Denmark. 148 alcohol dependent individuals participated. The study reported a significant difference in alcohol abstinence between control and treatment groups when data was aggregated over the one-year period. However, by the end of ...


4

The article you link to is fairly comprehensive, and probably already answers your questions. Dissociative Identity Disorder is no longer referred to as multiple personality disorder. This is a highly misunderstood disorder, and involves many possible symptoms besides the appearance of "alters". "The diagnosis itself remains controversial among mental ...


4

The short version is that in Europe and North America, at least, the answer is predominantly yes: your GP is supposed to refer you to a relevant mental practitioner on a case by case basis. This can be prompted either by voluntary disclosure (i.e., the patient brings up mental health issues themselves) or suggested based on comments made by the patients. GPs ...


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